Art

Art, Events, hudson yards

See inside Hudson Yards arts center The Shed

By Devin Gannon, Fri, April 5, 2019

View from Hudson Yards; Photo by Iwan Baan, courtesy of The Shed

A new cultural institution in New York City is finally open after more than a decade in the making. The Shed, which straddles the recently opened Hudson Yards neighborhood and the High Line on 30th Street, will commission and present original artwork across a variety of disciplines. Designed by Diller Scofidio + Renfro and Rockwell Group, the building features a 120-foot movable shell, allowing it to physically change on demand and adapt to different performances. Kicking things off today, April 5 is a five-night concert series, “Soundtrack of America,” which was directed by Steve McQueen, Quincy Jones, and Maureen Mahon, and explores the impact of African American music on modern culture.

See more here

Art, Brooklyn, Design

Design proposal by Mickalene Thomas

The city announced last November plans to commission a permanent statue in Brooklyn of Shirley Chisholm, a Bed-Stuy native who became the first black woman to serve in the House of Representatives. On Wednesday, the Department of Cultural Affairs unveiled five finalist design proposals and asked the public for feedback. An artist will be selected next month, with the monument, which will be placed outside of the Parkside entrance to Prospect Park, completed at the end of next year. The statue of Chisholm will be the first monument constructed under the city’s She Built NYC! initiative, which aims to increase the number of public monuments dedicated to NYC women. Currently, just five of the city’s 150 statues are of women.

See the designs

Art, hudson yards

You can rename Hudson Yards’ climbable ‘Vessel’

By Devin Gannon, Tue, March 26, 2019

Photo © James and Karla Murray for 6sqft

Officially open to the public for nearly two weeks, the centerpiece of New York City’s newest neighborhood needs a name. Known best as “Vessel,” the bronzed steel and concrete sculpture designed by Thomas Heatherwick was never given an official title. Earlier this year, developer Related Companies told 6sqft that “Vessel” was just a placeholder until the public experienced the installation. And with hundreds of selfies taken at the site since its opening on March 15, Related is now asking the public to rename the 150-foot honeycomb-like structure.

Have any ideas?

Featured Story

Architecture, Art, Features, hudson yards

The long-awaited Hudson Yards development opened on Friday and with it, the centerpiece of the 28-acre project: a 150-foot-tall climbable public art piece, known as “Vessel.” Designed by Thomas Heatherwick, the impressive bronzed steel-and-concrete structure offers visitors a one-mile vertical climbing experience through 154 interconnected flights of stairs and 2,500 individual steps. On Friday, 6sqft joined the first group of people to ever climb the honeycomb-shaped sculpture. Ahead, get up close to the intricately-designed Vessel and learn how to reserve tickets to climb it.

See inside the sculpture

Art, Events

stephen mallon, sea train, artificial reef, events, photography

Air Break, 2008. Photo by Stephen Mallon.

By now you may have seen Stephen Mallon’s mind-bending photo series showing thousands of decommissioned NYC subway cars being tossed into the Atlantic Ocean. The MTA initiative was undertaken more than 10 years ago with the goal of creating artificial reefs that would support sea life along the eastern seabed. The amazing photo series, briefly on view at NYU’s Kimmel Galleries, documented the train cars being heaved into the briny deep from Delaware to South Carolina over three years. Now, a new exhibit, “Sea Train: Subway Reef Photos by Stephen Mallon,” opening March 20th at the New York Transit Museum’s Grand Central Gallery, features 19 large-format photographs that capture the iconic subway cars, dropped like toy trains from hulking barges as they’re being deployed as sea-life-sustaining artificial reefs,

More amazing photos and their story, this way

Art, Lower East Side

Photo taken by 6sqft

When 6sqft visited designer, artist, and activist Sebastian Errazuriz in his Bronx studio last year, we noted that “nothing he does is cookie-cutter.” This outside-the-box thinking is now on view for all of NYC to see in his latest public artwork titled blu Marble, a 20-foot, LED structure in a vacant Lower East Side lot that depicts live NASA satellite footage of the Earth. Located at 159 Ludlow Street, blue Marble will be on view until 14th to “inspire awareness and mindfulness in our everyday lives.”

Find out more

Art, Bronx, Events

It's the bronx, ITB, Union Crossing, the bronx, festivals, round seven, events

The creators of The Bronx Night Market will soon be launching a grand festival dedicated to “celebrating Bronx hustle.” The It’s the Bronx (@itsthebronx) festival will take place on March 22-24 at the Union Crossing building in Port Morris, featuring up-and-coming musicians, visual artists, discussion panels, video screening, a gallery exhibit and street performances plus plenty to eat and drink.

Find out more

Featured Story

Art, Features, History, Museums

“Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney, half-length portrait, standing with statue of soldiers,” 1920, via, The Library of Congress

When the first Armory Show came to New York City in 1913, it marked the dawn of Modernism in America, displaying work by Van Gogh, Gauguin, Cezanne, Picasso, Matisse, and Duchamp for the very first time. Not only did female art patrons provide 80 percent of the funding for the show, but since that time, women have continued to be the central champions of American modern and contemporary art. It was Abby Aldrich Rockefeller who founded MoMA; Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney the Whitney; Hilla von Rebay the Guggenheim; Aileen Osborn Webb the Museum of Art and Design; and Marcia Tucker the New Museum. Read on to meet the modern women who founded virtually all of New York City’s most prestigious modern and contemporary art museums.

More Modern Women

Art, Long Island City

Hórama Rama by Pedro & Juana, winner of the 2019 Young Architects Program. Ana Paula Ruiz Galindo & Mecky Reuss. Mexico City, Mexico

Serving as the light at the end of winter’s tunnel, MoMA PS1 unveiled this week the winning design for its popular summer outdoor music series Warm Up. The installation “Hórama Rama” by Pedro & Juana (a Mexico City-based studio founded by Ana Paula Ruiz Galindo and Mecky Reuss) will bring an immersive “junglescape” with a cyclorama that sits on top of the concrete courtyard walls. “Hórama Rama” will feature a 40-foot-tall, 90-foot-wide structure that floats over the courtyard space, with hammocks and a functioning, two-story waterfall contributing to the wilderness vibe. The temporary exhibit accompanies the outdoor music series that runs from June to September.

See the winning design

Art, Tribeca

Rendering by Anish Kapoor.

Herzog & de Meuron’s striking “Jenga” condo tower at 56 Leonard Street in Tribeca is a conversation piece on its own, with its cantilevered rectangles of glass rising into the sky. The long-anticipated flourish that will anchor the skyscraper–artist Anish Kapoor’s reflective bean-shaped sculpture–is finally on the way, as evidenced by an intricate set of circles and arrows that just arrived on the building’s sidewalk. The spray-painted outline will inform installation of the sculpture, which resembles a similar public art icon in Chicago, where Kapoor’s “Cloud Gate” sculpture apparently attracts millions of tourists every year and has become an Instagram staple.

What’s taking so long, the anticipation is killing us

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