Art

Art, Events

Ai Weiwei banner 2, outside trump tower; Photo Timothy Schenk, courtesy Public Art Fund, NY

Nearly a year ago, artist Ai Weiwei‘s project, “Good Fences Make Good Neighbors,” commissioned by the Public Art Fund, covered New York City with installations and banners in reference to the current international refugee crisis. Though the works are no longer on display, their message remains even more pressing. In commemoration of World Refugee Day on June 20, the Public Art Fund and eBay for Charity put Ai’s project back into public reach with the sale of limited-edition original portrait banners drawn from those made by the artist (h/t Surface). There are six banners in all, and sales benefit USA for the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), the International Rescue Committee (IRC), and the Fund’s mission to promote accessible art.

How much are they, and how do I get one?

Art, Greenwich Village, Landscape Architecture, Top Stories

LGBT, Pride NYC, nyc monuments

Rendering by Anthony Goicolea via Gov. Cuomo’s office

A monument to the LGBTQ community is taking shape in Hudson River Park along the Greenwich Village waterfront. Last year, Gov. Andrew Cuomo chose Brooklyn-based artist Anthony Goicolea to design the monument, aimed at honoring both the LGBT rights movement and the victims of the 2016 Orlando Pulse nightclub shooting. Although the Hudson River Park Trust told 6sqft an opening date of the installation isn’t known yet, Urban Omnibus reported the monument is expected to be completed this month, coinciding with Pride Month.

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Art, Events

Image: Andy Warhol’s “Campbell’s Soup Cans” at MoMA, via Brando/Flickr

“To humanize Warhol and get people to actually look at what he made is not as easy as it might sound.” Donna De Salvo, deputy director and senior curator at the Whitney Museum of American Art had this to say to the New York Times among other newly-released details on what to expect in “Andy Warhol — From A to B and Back Again,” opening on November 12th. The show will be the first Warhol retrospective offered by a United States museum since 1989. De Salvo is referring to the myth of Warhol, in his lifetime and even more so after it.

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Art, Events

MOMA PS1 Yayoi Kusama Rockaway

Yayoi Kusama at the 1966 Venice Biennale; via MOMA PS1

Yahoo! Yayoi is coming back to New York. From July 1 through September 3, MoMA PS1 will present “Rockaway!” featuring “Narcissus Garden,” a site-specific installation made up of 1,500 mirrored stainless steel spheres by the uber-talented, polka dot-obsessed Japanese artist, Yayoi Kusama. This is MOMA’s third iteration of Rockaway!, a free public art festival dedicated to the ongoing recovery efforts after Hurricane Sandy.

The exhibit will be on view at the Gateway National Recreation Area, a former train garage at Fort Tilden, which once was an active U.S. military base. Kusama’s mirrored metal spheres reflect the industrial surroundings of the abandoned building and highlight Fort Tilden’s history. According to MoMA, the metal directs attention to the damage inflicted by Sandy in 2012 on the surrounding area.

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Art, Brooklyn, East Village

stacked rhinos sculpture

Photo via Goodbye Rhinos project

The iconic stacked rhino sculpture is switching boroughs. Designed by artists, Gillie and Marc Schattner, The Last Three is a 17-foot-tall, bronze sculpture depicting the last three Northern White Rhinos Najin, Fatu and Sudan, and represents a protest of rhino horn sales. The artists announced on Tuesday that the sculpture will move from its current home at Astor Place and be permanently installed at Forest City New York’s MetroTech Center in Downtown Brooklyn. The first public viewing will start Wednesday at 6 pm.

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Art, Transportation

pridetrain, pride month, nyc pride

The normally drab service posters found across the city’s subway stations got a burst of color this month. Instead of detailing changes to late-night train service, these rainbow-adorned signs remind commuters that no “bigotry, hatred or prejudice” is allowed at any time, as Pride Month, a celebration of LGBTQ love, kicks off. Originally created by School of Visual Arts faculty member Thomas Shim and alumni Ezequiel Consoli and Jack Welles (Kyle Harrison was added to the core team this year), the posters will remain fastened to the station walls throughout the month of June.

More details here

Featured Story

Architecture, Art, Features, History, Landscape Architecture, NYC Guides, Top Stories

hidden attractions nyc, underground nyc, nyc attractions

While visiting the major, most popular attractions of New York City can be fun, it can also be stressful, overwhelming and full of selfie-taking tourists. However, the great thing about the Big Apple is that plenty of other attractions exist that are far less known or even hidden in plain sight. To go beyond the tourist-filled sites and tour the city like you’re seeing it for the very first time, check out 6sqft’s list ahead of the 20 best underground, secret spots in New York City.

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Art, Events

Sing for Hope Pianos via Sing for Hope

Starting this week, 51 beautifully painted pianos will pop up across New York City, available to anyone interested in striking a few keys. As part of its seventh annual event, Sing for Hope is setting up the pianos in parks, public spaces and other high-traffic outside locations in the city from June 4 to June 24. Following this summer stint, the pianos will get permanent homes in 50 public schools. The brightly colored and funkily patterned pianos were painted by artists from around the world, with each instrument featuring its own theme.

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Featured Story

Art, Bronx, Features, Landscape Architecture

Photos courtesy of William Christ

Opened in 1863, and long known as the final resting place of some of history’s most notable figures— Irving Berlin, Miles Davis, Duke Ellington, Robert Moses, F.W. Woolworth, and Herman Melville, to name a few–the Bronx’s Woodlawn Cemetery and Conservatory is also home to many treasures of the living variety. When one of Woodlawn’s trees (of which there are a whopping 140 different species!) meets its ultimate fate, the cemetery doesn’t merely bury it but rather celebrates its life by carving it into an animal that can be found on the grounds.

Find out the meaning behind this tradition

Art, Museums

Photo via The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Following two years of renovations, the Metropolitan Museum of Art reopened its impressive music collection, which includes roughly 5,000 instruments dating from about 300 B.C. to the present, grouping them by period and type, rather than culture by which they were created. The redesign of the exhibit, called The Art of Music, places “Fanfare” as the first gallery. Drawing visitors into the instrument gallery, Fanfare features 74 brass instruments “spanning two millennia and five continents.” It includes sacred conches, animal horns, a vuvuzela and more. And now, for the first time, the instruments can be heard through dynamic kiosks at the museum, or online.

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