Bring Tomorrow’s Weather Indoors With Tempescope

Posted On Wed, March 2, 2016 By

Posted On Wed, March 2, 2016 By In Design, Products, Technology

Weather in New York is anything but predictable these days, with 60-degree days followed up by below-freezing winds. But while fluctuating temps have been irksome, we’ve found a fun little gadget that makes unpredictable weather a serene and beautiful thing. Meet Tempescope, an ambient physical display devised by Ken Kawamoto that physically visualizes impeding weather conditions like rain, clouds and lightning. The minimal device is designed to receive weather forecasts from the Internet and reproduce the next day’s sky inside your home.

In addition to being the inventor of the Tempescope, Tokyo-based Ken Kawamoto is a software engineer and maker. He created the gadget’s first prototype a few years ago as a weekend project using $1 shampoo bottles. According to his site, his aim was to “always have the sunshine (and occasional tropical thunderstorms) of the Okinawa isles in the living room.”

Ken Kawamoto, weather device, Tempescope, Visualize Tomorrow's Weather With Tempescope, DIY, weather forecast, OpenTempescope, LED light

Tempescope can be placed on a shelf or bedside table or be used as a doorstopper. It features a built-in LED light that illuminates the crazy weather conditions happening within.

Ken Kawamoto, weather device, Tempescope, Visualize Tomorrow's Weather With Tempescope, DIY, weather forecast, OpenTempescope, LED light

Golden sunshine, heavy clouds, light rain and storms are all part of this gadget’s range. The sleek tower can also be set to give you forecasts from other locations as well.

Ken Kawamoto, weather device, Tempescope, Visualize Tomorrow's Weather With Tempescope, DIY, weather forecast, OpenTempescope, LED light

For the moment, the device isn’t for sale, but Kawamoto and his team are in talks with potential manufacturers and distributors.

In the meantime, if you’re up for a cool DIY weekend project, you can build a Tempescope yourself! Kawamoto created an Open Source version (OpenTempescope) that can be easily built by anyone with basic tools.

Learn more about Tempescope here.

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