sustainable architecture

Architecture, Green Design, Upstate

Earth-Sheltered Home Uses Surroundings to Save on Energy

By Alyssa Alimurung, Wed, October 1, 2014

John Grzibowski, earth sheltered home, earth shelter, Newburgh new york, Newburgh, upstate new york, sustainable design, sustainable architecture, sustainable construction

We’ve featured plenty of beautiful sustainable homes here on 6sqft, many of which include some pretty hi-tech gadgets from geothermal wells to highly reflective roofing materials. But John Grzibowski decided to just use what’s available in nature. He built an Earth-sheltered home in Newburgh, New York that strategically uses the surrounding landscape to insulate itself. The adobe was even built using locally-sourced materials. Why go out and buy expensive technology when we can just use the gifts that Mother Nature gives us?

READ MORE HERE…

Architecture, Green Design

Paolo Venturella, Flex Tower, NYC architecture ideas, photovoltaic panels

It’s 2040 in New York City, and the metropolis’ population has doubled over, thereby drastically increasing energy consumption. How do architects alter their designs to deal with this new landscape? Italian architect Paolo Venturella thinks he’s come up with the answer to this (currently hypothetical) conundrum.

The Flex Tower concept combines the need for housing with a sustainable energy system that uses a new typology for photovoltaic panels. At ground level the structure is in keeping with the traditional street grid, but as it rises it rotates toward the sun to position the panels correctly.

More about the curving creation this way

Architecture, Green Design, Interiors, Upstate

Aluminum-Clad houses, contemporary country homes, Grzywinski + Pons, Dutchess House No. 1, Millerton New York homes, sustainable architecture

There are no cedar shakes or white picket fences at this country abode in Millerton, New York. At Dutchess House No. 1, the architectural firm Grzywinski + Pons met their client’s needs for an upstate retreat with a strikingly modern yet traditionally functional design, incorporating sustainable elements, rustic details, and clever security features.

The most unexpected element of the home is its aluminum-clad façade, playfully sculpted to resemble the surface of bricks. Contrasting the shimmery panels are Ipe wood screens and bright yellow doors, both of which connect to the surrounding landscape.

There are a lot more surprises in this home that you won’t want to miss

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