LPC

Art, Financial District

Photo by Ahmer Kalam on Unsplash

The New York City Public Design Commission (PDC) voted Monday to extend the iconic “Fearless Girl” sculpture’s permit to remain at her current spot across from the New York Stock Exchange, but with the caveat that plans for a permanent location must be presented in six months, the New York Times reports. The city’s vote extends the permit for 11 months, but asset management firm State Street Global Advisors, the statue’s owner, and Kristen Visbal, the artist who created the statue, must meet with the city again in six months to determine where its permanent home will be.

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Art, Financial District

Photo by Ahmer Kalam on Unsplash

New York City’s Landmarks Preservation Commission agreed in a unanimous vote on Tuesday to keep the popular “Fearless Girl” statue in its home on Broad Street across from the New York Stock Exchange for three more years.  As 6sqft previously reported, the statue’s permit with the Landmarks Preservation Commission (LPC) expired on November 29. State Street Global Advisors, the statue’s owners, submitted a request for a ten-year permit last year, which will ultimately be addressed at a hearing before the Public Design Commission, which oversees the city’s art collection. The LPC vote was based solely on the statue’s placement in a historically significant location.

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Landmarks Preservation Commission, Upper East Side

Renderings and photos by Madd Equities LLC, via LPC

In a public hearing on Tuesday, the Landmarks Preservation Commission reviewed and approved an application to open a Trader Joe’s in the city-owned space underneath the Queensboro Bridge on Manhattan’s Upper East Side. The cavernous space, known as Bridgemarket, is regarded for its 5,000-square-foot Guastavino-tiled arcade as well as its unique location. Former tenant Food Emporium moved out in 2015. The bridge and the space beneath it were designated a city landmark in 1974. The LPC applauded the proposal’s “sensitive approach” to the space.

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Chelsea, History, Landmarks Preservation Commission, Staten Island, Upper West Side , West Village 

Top, left to right: GAA Firehouse, James Baldwin Residence, LGBT Community Center; Bottom, left to right: Audre Lorde Residence, Women’s Liberation Center, Caffe Cino; All photos courtesy of NYC LGBT Historic Sites Project

The city’s Landmarks Preservation Commission voted on Tuesday to calendar six individual sites related to the history of the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) community in New York City. The proposed landmarks highlight both groups and individuals who have advanced the LGBT rights movement by providing structure for community and political support, as well as raising public awareness. The commission’s decision to calendar the sites comes ahead of next month’s 50th anniversary of the Stonewall uprising and NYC’s annual Pride celebration. LPC Chair Sarah Carroll said on Tuesday a public hearing to discuss the sites will be held June 4.

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Bay Ridge, Landmarks Preservation Commission

LPC, Bay ridge, historic districts,landmarks, Landmarks Preservation Commission

Image courtesy of Landmarks Preservation Commission

Bay Ridge residents and elected officials voiced their support for the neighborhood’s first historic district during a Landmarks Preservation Commission hearing Tuesday. The commission voted in March to calendar the proposed Brooklyn district, known as the Bay Ridge Parkway Doctors’ Row Historic District. Comprised of 54 architecturally consistent row houses along Bay Ridge Parkway between 4th and 5th Avenues, the district includes a row of limestone-fronted houses–referred to as Doctors’ Row based on both its historic and current residential demographics. This block reflects the neighborhood’s growth from a suburban resort community to an urban neighborhood ahead of the opening of the 4th Avenue Subway line in the early 20th century.

Making the case for historic Bay Ridge, this way

History, Landmarks Preservation Commission, Nomad

Tin Pan alley, lpc, historic district, Nomad

Via LPC

The Landmarks Preservation Committee heard mixed testimonies yesterday during a public hearing over the designation of five buildings on West 28th Street between Fifth and Sixth Avenues known as Tin Pan Alley. The buildings in question—ranging from 47-55 West 28th Street—are notable for the significant concentration of sheet music publishers they housed during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. As music publishers continued to flock to the block, the nickname “Tin Pan Alley” was coined in 1903 to describe the sound of piano music that could be heard from every corner. Though most everyone in attendance agreed on the historical significance of these buildings, some pointed to the racist tunes that were also written there as a reason to block the landmark designation—with even the buildings’ owner, controversial developer Yair Levy, arguing against it.

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Bay Ridge, Landmarks Preservation Commission

LPC, Bay ridge, historic districts,landmarks, Landmarks Preservation Commission

Image courtesy of Landmarks Preservation Commission.

The Landmarks Preservation Commission voted today to calendar the Bay Ridge Parkway Doctors’ Row Historic District in the first formal step toward designation. The proposed district is comprised of 54 architecturally consistent row houses along Bay Ridge Parkway between 4th and 5th Avenues in Brooklyn’s Bay Ridge neighborhood. The row of limestone-fronted houses–referred to as Doctors’ Row based on both its historic and current residential demographics–is a distinguished example of the neighborhood’s growth from a suburban resort community to an urban neighborhood ahead of the 4th Avenue Subway line in the early 20th century.

More about the neighborhood, this way

History, Landmarks Preservation Commission, Nomad

Tin Pan alley, lpc, historic district, Nomad

Via LPC

The Landmarks Preservation Commission voted on Tuesday in favor of calendaring five buildings on West 28th Street in Manhattan’s “Tin Pan Alley,” in the neighborhood now called Nomad. The buildings at 47-55 West 28th Street were an integral part of the area known for having New York City’s most significant concentration of sheet music publishers at the turn of the 20th century, and as the birthplace of iconic American songs like “God Bless America.” It’s also where popular music icons like Irving Berlin and George Gershwin wrote songs. Calendaring is the first formal step in the historic status designation process.

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Historic Homes, Inwood, Landmarks Preservation Commission

Landmarks designates new Inwood historic district

By Michelle Cohen, Tue, December 11, 2018

lpc, historic districts, inwood

Image courtesy of NYC Landmarks Preservation Commission via Flickr.

The city’s Landmarks Preservation Commission voted today to designate the Park Terrace West-West 217th Street Historic District in the Inwood section of Manhattan. The historic district features an enclave of picturesque early 20th-century houses with landscaped topography that stand out among the neighborhood’s apartment buildings.

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Carroll Gardens, Historic Homes, Landmarks Preservation Commission

236 President Street, 238 President Street, LPC

(on right) 236 and (on left) 238 President Street via LPC

The city’s Landmarks Preservation Commission on Tuesday designated the Hans S. Christian Memorial Kindergarten at 236 President Street and the adjacent apartment building at 238 President Street as individual landmarks. The two Carroll Gardens buildings are associated with Elmira Christian, an advocate for early childhood education. “These two properties are distinguished by their architecture and share a great history of education and social reform in Brooklyn,” LPC Vice Chair Frederick Bland said in a statement.

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