Lenox Terrace

Harlem, Policy

lenox terrace, rezoning, harlem

Rendering credit: Davis Brody Bond

The City Council’s Zoning Committee voted unanimously to reject a proposed redevelopment of Harlem’s Lenox Terrace housing complex on Wednesday. The site’s owner, the Olnick Organization, has been seeking approval for a mixed-use development with five 28-story towers to be constructed at the complex. This week’s decision is expected to be a sign of what’s to come when the project comes to a vote before the full City Council next month. But Olnick has already signaled that they have a scaled-down backup plan for the site that won’t require a rezoning.

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Harlem, Policy

Rendering courtesy of the Olnick Organization

Amidst pushback from locals and activists, the Olnick Organization has released a Plan B proposal for its Lenox Terrace expansion, reports the Post. Last week, the City Planning Commission approved an application from the complex’s owner to rezone part of the neighborhood and allow five 28-story towers with a mix of market-rate and affordable units to be built at the site. The alternate plan unveiled on Tuesday presents a scaled-down version that wouldn’t require a zoning change but also wouldn’t include any of the affordable units or public amenities in the original plan.

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Harlem, Policy

lenox terrace, rezoning, harlem

Photo: Lenox Terrace Aerial; Credit: Davis Brody Bond

A plan to bring a mixed-use development with five buildings and 1,600 apartments to Central Harlem got a much-needed approval on Monday. The City Planning Commission voted in favor of an application from the Olnick Organization to rezone part of the neighborhood, clearing the way for five 28-story luxury towers to be constructed at the existing Lenox Terrace complex.

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Harlem, Policy

lenox terrace, rezoning, harlem

Aerial view of the project; Credit: Davis Brody Bond

A developer’s plan to rezone a neighborhood in Central Harlem to make way for a mixed-use development hit another roadblock this week. Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer on Monday rejected a rezoning application filed by the Olnick Organization to construct five 28-story luxury towers and one mid-rise building located at the existing Lenox Terrace complex. In her recommendation, Brewer said the project lacks the “public and private investments necessary to make it a prudent exercise of planning for future growth.”

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Harlem, Policy

lenox terrace, rezoning, harlem

Aerial view of the developer’s planned updates. Credit: Davis Brody Bond

Manhattan Community Board 10 voted Wednesday night against a developer’s plan that would substantially rezone the Lenox Terrace neighborhood in Central Harlem and pave the way for construction of five new 28-story luxury towers and big-box retail stores. The rezoning application, filed by the Olnick Organization, asked the city to rezone Lenox Terrace from its current residential status to the C6-2 designation found in “the central business district and regional commercial centers,” according to the city’s zoning resolution. The community board’s vote sided with the Lenox Terrace Association of Concerned Tenants (LT-ACT), which opposes the rezoning and has demanded the developer withdraw the application.

More on the resolution this way

Bronx, Brooklyn, CityRealty, Manhattan, New Jersey, Queens, Rentals

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By Ondel Hylton, Sat, February 17, 2018

Images (Clockwise): 175 KENT APARTMENTS, LENOX TERRACE, RIVERBANK and 1629 PACIFIC ST.

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Bronx, Brooklyn, CityRealty, Manhattan, New Jersey, Queens, Rentals

FREE RENT: This week’s roundup of NYC rental news

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Images (L to R): 606W57, The Delmar, Aurora and 88 Leonard Street

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Archtober2020