Essex Market

City Living

Arthur Avenue Retail Market, Arthur Avenue Bronx, Belmont Bronx, Bronx Little Italy

Photo of the Arthur Avenue Retail Market by Leonard J. DeFrancisci via Wikimedia Commons 

The New York City Economic Development Corporation (NYCEDC) last week unveiled a new brand strategy for the city’s network of six public markets, which includes a multilingual ad campaign, a dynamic new website and social media presence, direct mail campaigns and more, all of which are designed to consolidate a network of historic markets under one city-wide brand. It’s all part of the organization’s comprehensive initiative to promote NYC’s public markets–including Essex Market, the Bronx’s Arthur Avenue Market, and Williamsburg’s historic Moore Street Market–as “world class destinations for both local residents and tourists.”

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affordable housing, hudson yards, Lower East Side, Major Developments

Is Essex Crossing the ‘anti-Hudson Yards’?

By Michelle Cohen, Thu, November 7, 2019

Rendering of Essex Crossing via Moso Studio

The New York Times recently suggested that the boxy, ordinary-looking Essex Crossing, with its Trader Joe’s, Target, movieplex, historic Essex Street Market and subsidized affordable housing was the “anti-Hudson Yards,” a convincing foil to the buzzy midtown tourist magnet. The obvious contrast between the glittering far-west-side megaproject that in the right light resembles Dubai on the Hudson and the six-acre $1.9 billion development abutting the Williamsburg Bridge speaks to each one’s intended audience, of course. But a diversity of options for both locals and visitors and a broad offering of affordable housing could make Essex Crossing more than just Liverpool on the Lower East Side.

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Lower East Side, Restaurants

See inside the newly-opened Essex Street Market

By Michelle Cohen, Tue, May 14, 2019

Essex Street Market, Lower East Side

The latest version of the Lower East Side’s beloved Essex Street Market, its name streamlined to simply Essex Market, opened Monday in its new home inside the Essex Crossing development at 88 Essex Street. It’s triple the size of the original market, from which 21 vendors (yes, Shopsin’s remains) have moved in, along with 18 new stalls and two full-service restaurants. The old market officially closed its doors on May 5, making this the first new public market to open in the city since 1955.

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