diversity

Bronx, Brooklyn, City Living, Queens

queens, diversity, immigrants

Elmhurst’s Chinatown. Image: Wiki Commons.

Recent economic snapshots issued by the state comptroller show that New York City has continued to experience record economic expansion in the past three years. This growth has been led by notable gains in the economies of Queens, Brooklyn and the Bronx (Staten Island’s report is expected later this year), which since the 1990s have seen an economic boost from a large increase in their immigrant populations, Crain’s reports. The revitalization of these immigrant-rich areas has led to an uptick in the number of businesses as well as sales and job growth. Unemployment is at its lowest rate since 1990. Queens, the borough that is home the city’s most diverse population and becoming more so, is clearly one to watch.

More jobs, great food

City Living

Photo via WNYC/Flickr

A new data analysis effort from the Washington Post titled “The top 10 places people are moving, and how their choices differ by race” offers some interesting insights into where people are ending up when they come from…elsewhere. Though it’s not the article’s intent, the first thing we notice is that New York City is number one in attracting sheer masses, huddled and otherwise. And the biggest comparable block of hopeful humanity is coming “from abroad.” The attraction factor gets more complex, though, when we adjust for size, looking at the percentage of the overall population the newcomers comprise. In that case, metro areas like Colorado Springs and San Jose move to the top. And what about race? Even more complicated.

Read on

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