Studio Marchetti’s Dutchess County home is a series of pavilions sliding past each other

Posted On Sun, November 20, 2016 By

Posted On Sun, November 20, 2016 By In Design, Interiors, Upstate

Living outside of the city comes with its sacrifices, but breathtaking scenery is not one of them, not to mention ample space and modern architecture. This beautiful home is situated on a hill in Dutchess County and was designed for a young family by the New York architecture firm Studio Marchetti. The structure is made up of a series of pavilions that slide past each other in order to highlight the beautiful views and includes a pool and pergola to further integrate nature into the living space.

studio marchetti, dutchess

Enter the home through a garage with two entrances, serving as a garden wall of sorts.

studio marchetti, dutchess

The property is made up of cedar-clad volumes resting on a limestone base.

studio marchetti, dutchess

The west terrace has bluestone steps that lead up from the grass. Off to the right are the pool and pergola.

studio marchetti, dutchess

studio marchetti, dutchess

studio marchetti, dutchess

The highlight of the home’s interior are the massive windowed walls that extend two stories upwards. The shared living space is open to both levels, and the upper lofted levels border the central space ensuring massive amounts of light throughout the home.

studio marchetti, dutchess

studio marchetti, dutchess

The kitchen features hardwood floors and graphic tile walls, and the oversized island and cabinetry compliment the home’s open layout. The refrigerator and wall ovens mimic the exterior’s cedar cladding.

studio marchetti, dutchess

The textures and layout of the master bedroom mimic the look at feel of the home’s exterior, featuring a symmetrical floor plan with bathrooms located on each side of the bed.

studio marchetti, dutchess

studio marchetti, dutchess

See more work from Studio Marchetti here.

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Images courtesy of Studio Marchetti

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  • Tim Keating

    One must assume that the entire outside of this building is clad with Western redcedar. Given the orangish tone, it would be even worse if it’s cumaru, but we haven’t seen a lot of that used for siding. Too bad about the cedar. Demand for clear WRC is driving the logging of the last really-old WRC trees in British Columbia (we logged all of them in the lower 48, except for a few left in national parks). When are we going to end this crazy destruction? There are such great alternatives, but folks only know the old, go-to materials, which, of course, were coming from what people thought were unending ancient forests. Now, we know better and should, then… know better. Check out earthbilt.com for truly sustainable alternatives.

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