Greenwich Village

Art, Greenwich Village, Landscape Architecture

Photo by Tia Richards for 6sqft

New York’s first public monument to the LGBTQ community opened Sunday in the Greenwich Village, a historically significant neighborhood for the gay rights movement. Located in Hudson River Park and designed by local artist Anthony Goicolea, the monument honors the victims of the 2016 Pulse nightclub shooting, as well as all victims of hate and violence.

“This memorial saddens us, when we think about the Orlando 49 senseless deaths, but it also enlightens us, and it also inspires us,” Cuomo said on Sunday. “It inspires New Yorkers to do what New Yorkers have always done – what Anthony was referring to: to push forward, to keep going forward on that journey until we reach the destination that the Statue of Liberty promised in the first place.”

Find out more

Art, Greenwich Village, Landscape Architecture

LGBT, Pride NYC, nyc monuments

Rendering by Anthony Goicolea via Gov. Cuomo’s office

A monument to the LGBTQ community is taking shape in Hudson River Park along the Greenwich Village waterfront. Last year, Gov. Andrew Cuomo chose Brooklyn-based artist Anthony Goicolea to design the monument, aimed at honoring both the LGBT rights movement and the victims of the 2016 Orlando Pulse nightclub shooting. Although the Hudson River Park Trust told 6sqft an opening date of the installation isn’t known yet, Urban Omnibus reported the monument is expected to be completed this month, coinciding with Pride Month.

More here

Greenwich Village, History

Stonewall Inn, LGBTQ, historic monuments

Via Wikimedia

Did you participate in the Stonewall Inn Riots of 1969 and the period of LGBTQ activism in New York City between 1968 and 1971? Do you know someone who did? If so, consider contributing pride memorabilia from that moment in history to the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual & Transgender Community Center, which is compiling a collection to preserve the history of Stonewall. The project, Stonewall Forever, launched last year after Google granted the LGBT Center $1 million to preserve oral histories and experiences of those present during the riots.

Find out more

Featured Story

Features, Greenwich Village, People, West Village , Where I Work

6sqft’s series “Where I Work” takes us into the studios, offices, and off-beat workspaces of New Yorkers across the city. In this installment, we’re touring the oldest pharmacy in the United States, C.O. Bigelow Apothecaries in Greenwich Village, and talking with owner Ian Ginsberg. Want to see your business featured here? Get in touch!

C.O. Bigelow Apothecaries was established in 1838. It is the oldest apothecary in America. It was originally called the Village Apothecary Shop and was opened by the Vermont physician, Galen Hunter. It was renamed C.O. Bigelow Apothecary when it was purchased by an employee, Clarence Otis Bigelow in 1880. The apothecary is in fact so old that it once sold leeches and opium as remedies. According to legend, the chemists at Bigelow even created a salve for Thomas Edison to treat his burned fingers when he was first developing the light bulb.

In 1922, the apothecary was sold to the pharmacist, Mr. Bluestone, employed by Bigelow, thereby continuing the unique legacy of passing ownership from employer to employee. Bluestone sold the pharmacy to yet another pharmacist employee, William B. Ginsberg in 1939. And since 1939, three generations of Ginsberg’s have owned and operated the shop, passing down from father to son to most recently grandson, Ian Ginsberg, who 6sqft spoke with at this historic pharmacy in Greenwich Village at 414 Sixth Avenue.

See inside

Celebrities, Greenwich Village, Interiors, Recent Sales

It was only four years ago that Rolling Stones guitarist Keith Richards and his wife, model Patti Hansen, bought the penthouse at celeb-filled 1 Fifth Avenue for $10.5 million. Two years later, after an overhaul by architect Joe Serrins, the rock legend listed the Greenwich Village spread for $12.23 million. But as it goes, “You Can’t Always Get What You Want,” and in October 2017 he dropped the price to $12 million even and brought it celebrity stager Cheryl Eisen. The price continued to decline, dropping to $11 million this past November, and most recently $9.95 million. Now, the Observer reports that it’s gone into contract, meaning he more than likely took a loss.

Check out the penthouse

Celebrities, Greenwich Village, Recent Sales

Jessica Lange is movin’ on up. According to city property records first spotted by The Real Deal, the Academy-award winning actress bought the two-bedroom co-op directly above her current home in 1 Fifth Avenue. Lange paid $3.3 million, more than $500,000 under the asking price, for the sun-filled unit, which is much in need of updating. But this won’t be a problem if the speculation that she’s looking to combine the two apartments is true.

Read more

Celebrities, Cool Listings, Greenwich Village

11 5th Avenue, The Brevoort, Buddy Holly apartment, Buddy Holly Greenwich Village

Before his untimely death in 1959–the “day the music died”–Buddy Holly briefly lived at the then-brand-new Brevoort apartment building in Greenwich Village. His band the Crickets had moved to NYC in 1958 to be a part of the music scene, so Holly and new wife Maria Elena Santiago rented a corner two-bedroom apartment with a wrap-around terrace for just $1,000 a month. This unit, where he made his final recordings of “Crying,” “Waiting, Hoping,” and “Peggy Sue Got Married,” has just hit the market for $1,595,000 (h/t Curbed).

See his former home

Celebrities, Cool Listings, Greenwich Village

59 West 12th Street, Marisa Tomei, Celebrities, Cool listings, Greenwich Village, co-ops

Image of Marisa Tomei via Wikimedia Commons.

Oscar-winner Marisa Tomei has put her longtime home in the Emery Roth-designed Bing & Bing co-op at 59 West 12th Street up for sale. The actress carved out the custom home for herself by combining her original unit with a neighbor’s for 2,265 square feet of living space, then bestowed it with a top-to-toe designer-assisted renovation (h/t Curbed). The high-floor Greenwich Village home has two terraces and open downtown Manhattan views.

Get a closer look

Featured Story

East Village, Features, Greenwich Village, GVSHP, History, People

Elizabeth Blackwell’s NYC: The historic sites where America’s first female doctor made her mark

By Andrew Berman of the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation, Thu, May 17, 2018

An 1870 newspaper illustration of Elizabeth Blackwell giving an anatomy lecture alongside a corpse at the Woman’s Medical College of New York Infirmary. Courtesy of the U.S. Library of Congress.

One of the most radical and influential women of the 19th century changed the course of public health history while living and working in Greenwich Village and the East Village. Elizabeth Blackwell, America’s first female doctor, established cutting-edge care facilities and practices throughout these neighborhoods, the imprint of which can still be felt to this day in surviving institutions and buildings. In fact, one recently received a historic plaque to mark this ground-breaking but often overlooked piece of our history.

Take a tour of Elizabeth Blackwell’s NYC

Celebrities, Greenwich Village, Recent Sales

Though she’s spent most of her career in LaLa Land filming “Gilmore Girls” and “Parenthood,” actress Lauren Graham has also kept a NYC crash pad for years. Unsurprisingly, the laid-back Graham chose to set up Downtown, buying a one-bedroom co-op at 24 Fifth Avenue, just two blocks north of Washington Square Park, for $570,000 in 2014. She’s now unloaded the lovely little place for $825,000, according to city records.

See the whole place

SIGN UP FOR OUR NEWSLETTERS

Thank you, your sign-up request was successful!
This email address is already subscribed, thank you!
Please provide a valid email address.
Please complete the CAPTCHA.
Oops. Something went wrong. Please try again later.