Greenwich Village

Greenwich Village, Manhattan, Policy

Streetview of 144 Bleecker Street © 2023 Google

New York’s second legal recreational cannabis shop is set to open in Greenwich Village next week, Gov. Kathy Hochul announced Thursday. Smacked LLC, located inside a nearly 200-year-old building at 144 Bleecker Street, will open its doors to the public on January 24 at 10 a.m. The store is the first in the state to be opened by an entrepreneur with a cannabis conviction, as part of a program to ensure equity in licensing. Owned and operated by Roland Conner, Smacked LLC will operate as a soft “popup” through February 20 and re-open as a long-term business at a later date.

Find out more

Greenwich Village, Historic Homes, Recent Sales

Photos courtesy of Brown Harris Stevens unless otherwise noted

The Greenwich Village townhouse of late civil rights attorney William Kunstler sold last month for $6,500,000, according to CityRealty. Kunstler, who famously defended the Chicago Seven, Malcolm X, Adam Clayton Powell, Jr., and others, and his wife, attorney Margaret Ratner Kunstler, paid $225,000 for the townhouse in 1981, as the Wall Street Journal reported. Located at 13 Gay Street, the four-story brick Greek Revival townhouse was built in 1844 and retains the same 19th-century charm of its neighbors.

Get the details

Cool Listings, Design, Greenwich Village

Photo credit: MW Studios for Sotheby’s International Realty

Vogue editor-at-large Hamish Bowles has long been celebrated for his distinctive and eclectic taste. The design editor purchased this pre-war Greenwich Village duplex for $1.5 million in a 2008 estate sale and proceeded to infuse every corner of it with lush textiles and colors, antique furnishings, vintage books, and couture menswear. The longtime Vogue fixture relocated back to his native London when he took a job as editor-in-chief of The World of Interiors magazine in 2021. Now, his charming two-bedroom co-op at 45 East 9th Street is for sale, asking $2,900,000. Bowles tells the New York Times, “During the pandemic it became a salvation–and a marvelous place for me to call home.”

A stylish eyeful, this way

Cool Listings, Greenwich Village, West Village 

Photo credit: Brown Harris Stevens

This clean, bright, and utterly charming prewar one-bedroom home is located in the landmarked 1893 Amos Street Condominium at 225 West 10th Street in the heart of Greenwich Village. Located at the back of the building’s main floor, above street level, the apartment, asking $1,085,000, features high ceilings, crown moldings, and hardwood floors throughout–and a lovely private patio garden, perfect for informal gatherings any day of the week.

Get a closer look

Greenwich Village, History, Landmarks Preservation Commission

Julius’ Bar. Map data © 2020 Google

New York City’s oldest gay bar is the city’s newest landmark. The Landmarks Preservation Commission on Tuesday voted unanimously to designate Julius’ Bar as an individual landmark, citing the significant role the historic Greenwich Village establishment played in advancing rights for LGBTQ+ New Yorkers. The bar was the site of the 1966 “Sip-In,” a protest by members of the Mattachine Society against a New York state law that prohibited bars from serving “suspected gay men or lesbians.”

Details here

Cool Listings, Greenwich Village

All photos courtesy of Coldwell Banker Warburg

Looking for a New York City one-bedroom with a flexible floor plan, private outdoor space, and a charming location? It will cost you $1,875,000. Located at 11 Fifth Avenue in the “Gold Coast” of Greenwich Village, this available co-op is decently sized at roughly 1,000 square feet. There’s a home office that could easily become a second bedroom and a terrace that stretches the entire living area.

Take a look around

Greenwich Village, Historic Homes, Landmarks Preservation Commission

Photo by Spencer Means on Flickr

A 200-year-old landmarked property in Greenwich Village once home to author Ruth McKenney could soon be demolished. The city’s Department of Buildings last week ordered the immediate demolition of the rowhouse at 14 Gay Street after learning unpermitted work on the building has left it at risk of collapsing. According to The Village Sun, adjacent 16 Gay Street, also constructed in 1827, has also been compromised.

Get the details

Cool Listings, Greenwich Village

All photos courtesy of Russ Ross for The Corcoran Group

New Yorkers know how to make the most out of scarce square footage with space-saving storage, built-ins, and decor tricks. This available Greenwich Village takes small-space design to the next level with a sliding wall that expands the living room by several feet and a Murphy bed that easily transforms the home office into a second bedroom. Located on the 21st floor of the full-service co-op building at 101 West 12th Street, the clever apartment, listed for $3,250,000, even has private outdoor space, too.

See the clever design

Architecture, Design, Events, Greenwich Village

Image courtesy of Sam Lahoz

The annual competition that pits New York City-based architectural firms against each other to carve the best pumpkin is returning on Friday, just in time for Halloween. Known as Pumpkitecture, the event will give onlookers the opportunity to see architects hone their skills in real-time and compete for the big prize, the Pritzkerpumpkin. Pumpkitecture will take place at the Center for Architecture at 536 LaGuardia Place in Greenwich Village on October 28 from 6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.

Get ready to go gourd to gourd

Featured Story

Features, Greenwich Village, History, holidays

Village Halloween Parade

Photo via John St John / Flickr

The Village Halloween Parade may not be as completely outrageous as it once was, but this annual holiday extravaganza is quintessential Greenwich Village. Though many parade attendees are there to show off their costumes and check out those of others, there’s a large number of guests who revel in the nostalgia of a New York tradition that’s marched downtown since 1973. But there’s a lot more history to the parade than most people may know. For instance, it didn’t always go up 6th Avenue, and there’s an entire art form behind those supersized puppets.

All the history right here

SIGN UP FOR OUR NEWSLETTERS

Thank you, your sign-up request was successful!
This email address is already subscribed, thank you!
Please provide a valid email address.
Please complete the CAPTCHA.
Oops. Something went wrong. Please try again later.