Greenwich Village

Architecture, condos, Greenwich Village, New Developments

ODA Architecture, 101 West 14th Street

Renderings via ODA Architecture

ODA Architecture has made its mark all over the city, and it’s easy to tell when a project bears their name thanks to the firm’s signature boxy aesthetic, often filled with cantilevers and stacked volumes. Their latest project–a boutique condo at 101 West 14th Street–is no exception. The mixed-use development on the corner of Sixth Avenue features 44 residential units, half of which will be duplexes, as well as retail space at street level.

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Events, Greenwich Village

Photo by Steven Pisano via Flickr cc

Though the Village Halloween Parade was just a small neighborhood gathering in 1973, it has taken place and grown every year since then except after Hurricane Sandy in 2012. This year, however, the beloved event is being cancelled for the second time ever due to COVID-19. Jeanne Fleming, who has been the director of the parade since 1985, broke the news yesterday to the Post, but promised New Yorkers a special “trick” in its place, though she’s remaining mum on those details for now.

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Cool Listings, Greenwich Village, Historic Homes

Photos by Andrew Kiracofe for Sotheby’s International Realty

New York City has several hidden mews sprinkled across its mostly gridded landscape, including MacDougal Alley in Greenwich Village. Located just north of Washington Square Park, the gated half-block cul-de-sac was constructed as a stretch of carriage houses to serve the townhouses that lined ritzy Washington Square North. Today, these charming carriage houses remain, and many of them have been transformed into private residences, like this one at number 6 Macdougal Alley. For the first time in 25 years, the nearly 1,800-square-foot red brick home is up for rent, asking $10,000 a month.

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Cool Listings, Greenwich Village

All photos by Evan Joseph

This Greenwich Village co-op at 2 East 12th Street is the perfect year-round oasis. For those cold winter months, the interiors are super cozy, with two working fireplaces. But in the summer, the backyard is a true retreat. It’s two levels, along with a side patio and, most notably, a sunken Japanese-style cedar hot tub. You’ll also find a large Ipe wood deck with a built-in banquette, plenty of planters, and a cedar potting shed for all those gardening needs.

You’ve got to see this place

Featured Story

Features, Greenwich Village, Where I Work

The secret history of Julius’, the oldest gay bar in NYC

By James and Karla Murray, Tue, July 21, 2020

Owner Helen Buford with longtime bartender Daniel Onzo

On the corner of West 10th and Waverly Place sits Julius’ Bar, New York City’s oldest gay bar. Constructed in the middle of the 19th-century, the landmarked Greenwich Village building first opened as a grocery store and later became a bar. In addition to being one of the oldest continuously operating bars in the city, Julius’ is also known for its historic “Sip-In” on April 26, 1966, when members of the Mattachine Society–one of the country’s earliest LGBT rights organizations–protested the state law that prohibited bars from serving “suspected gay men or lesbians.” Not only did the demonstration lead to the courts ruling in 1967 that gay people had the legal right to assemble and be served alcohol, but it also became one of the most significant instances of gay rights activism before the Stonewall Riots in 1969.

Like many businesses forced to close because of the coronavirus pandemic, especially now that indoor dining is on hold indefinitely, Julius’ owner Helen Buford is struggling to pay the bills and launched a fundraising campaign this month to help save the bar. Ahead, go behind the scenes of Julius’ while it remains closed, learn about its unique history from longtime bartenders Daniel Onzo and Tracy O’ Neill, and hear more from Helen about the struggle to survive as a small business during COVID-19.

Go behind the scenes

Celebrities, Greenwich Village, Policy, Restaurants

Gene’s Restaurant. Map data © 2020 Google

In an Instagram post on Wednesday, longtime Greenwich Village resident Sarah Jessica Parker posted a heartfelt note to Citi Bike, hoping they can help save one of her favorite local restaurants. Gene’s Restaurant has been located on West 11th Street near 6th Avenue for 101 years. But because of a Citi Bike rack right outside their front doors, the Italian restaurant has been unable to set up outdoor dining and is struggling from the pandemic fallout. “I’m happy to help move the @citibike rack just a bit east to make room for some outdoor seating. Whatever it takes,” wrote SJP, who is a Citi Bike rider herself.

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Construction Update, Greenwich Village, Restaurants

Julius’ Bar. Map data © 2020 Google

On the corner of West 10th Street and Waverly Place, Julius’ Bar stands as the oldest gay bar in New York City. It’s also known for the “Sip-In” that took place here in 1966, which ultimately led to legal LGBT bars and was one of the most significant instances of LGBT activism prior to Stonewall. Julius’ was forced to close its doors in mid-March amidst the COVID crisis, and they’ve since been unable to reopen. Therefore, they’ve launched a GoFundMe campaign to raise $50,000 that will keep them and their employees afloat until indoor dining is permitted.

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Greenwich Village, Restaurants

stonewall, pride month, lgbt

Photo by Rhododendrites on Wikimedia

New York City’s iconic Stonewall Inn got a much-needed lifeline this week after receiving a $250,000 donation from the Gill Foundation. The Greenwich Village bar, considered the birthplace of the LGBTQ rights movement, has been closed since March because of the coronavirus pandemic and has struggled to keep up with bills, including its $40,000/month rent. But thanks to the donation, and more than $300,000 raised as part of an online fundraiser, the national historic landmark will able to survive a little longer.

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Cool Listings, Greenwich Village

61 west 9th street, greenwich village, cool listings

Photo courtesy of The Corcoran Group

Custom wooden shutters, a wood-burning fireplace, and original casement windows bring a European flair to this Greenwich Village rental. A two-bedroom corner unit in the Windsor Arms co-op building at 61 West 9th Street is asking $7,500/month and it comes fully-furnished with “designer-grade pieces,” according to the listing.

Take the tour

Featured Story

East Village, Features, Greenwich Village, GVSHP, History, holidays

Pubs, parades, and politicians: The Irish legacy of the East Village and Greenwich Village

By Andrew Berman of Village Preservation, Tue, March 10, 2020

Photo of White Horse Tavern (bottom left) courtesy of Wikimedia; Photo of the Merchant’s House Museum (bottom right) courtesy of Village Preservation on Flickr

For many, celebrating Irish American heritage in March brings one to Fifth Avenue for the annual St. Patrick’s Day Parade, or perhaps a visit to St. Patrick’s Cathedral. But for those willing to venture beyond Midtown, there’s a rich Irish American history to be found in Greenwich Village and the East Village. While both neighborhoods became better known for different kinds of communities in later years – Italians, Ukrainians, gay men and lesbians, artists, punks – Irish immigration in the mid-19th century profoundly shaped both neighborhoods. Irish Americans and Irish immigrants played a critical role in building immigrant and artistic traditions in Greenwich Village and the East Village. Here are some sites connected to that great heritage, from the city’s oldest intact Catholic Church to Irish institutions like McSorely’s Old Ale House.

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Archtober2020