Greenwich Village

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Features, Greenwich Village, GVSHP, History

Black history in Greenwich Village: 15 sites related to pioneering African-Americans

By Andrew Berman of the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation, Fri, February 16, 2018

Image via Wikimedia

Greenwich Village has been known throughout its existence for breaking new ground and embracing outsiders. One often-forgotten but important element of that trailblazing narrative is the extraordinary role the Village played in relation to African American history. The neighborhood was home to North America’s earliest free Black settlement in the 17th century, to some of America’s first black churches in the 19th century, and many pioneering African-American artists, civil rights leaders, and organizations in the 20th century. This Black History Month, here are just a few of the exceptional Greenwich Village sites connected to African-American history.

Learn about all 15 sites here

Cool Listings, Greenwich Village, Interiors

171 west 12th street, co-op, greenwich village, corcoran

In New York we don’t just fall madly in love with people–we fall just as hard for real estate. So here’s a charming two-bedroom apartment to love from the Greenwich Village cooperative 171 West 12th Street. The listing boasts plenty of pre-war elegance in the form of original casement windows with double-paned glass, a wood-burning fireplace surrounded by exposed brick, and built-in bookshelves. And exposures to the south, west, and north–plus access to a balcony–bring in plenty of light. It’s just been listed for $1.85 million.

Take a look

Celebrities, Cool Listings, Greenwich Village

DNCE singer Joe Jonas and fiancee Sophie Turner, star of “Game of Thrones,” were recently spotted having a look at a Greenwich Village home in the newly-minted Annabelle Selldorf-designed condos that notoriously replaced the former Bowlmor Lanes at 21 East 12th Street. The New York Post reports that the pair checked out a unit in the building’s C-line, where two-bedroom homes span 2,028 square feet, priced between $5 and $6 million.

Get a closer look

Cool Listings, Greenwich Village, Interiors

2 east 12th street, greenwich village, nest seekers, short term rental

For a short-term rental option, this one-bedroom apartment with some Parisian style in Greenwich Village is up for rent. What’s so French-feeling about the space? 12-foot ceilings, beautiful crown moldings, large arched framed windows and some classy decor and art. The $5,000/month pad is available for between one and six months, according to the listing. It’s on the second floor of the walk-up building at 2 East 12th Street, just east of Fifth Avenue.

Check it out inside

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Features, Greenwich Village, GVSHP, History

The Greenwich Village church that threw a presidential election

By Andrew Berman of the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation, Thu, January 11, 2018

The Thirteenth Street Presbyterian Church in 1902, courtesy of the New-York Historical Society, Robert L. Bracklow Photograph Collection

The stately church building at 141-145 West 13th Street in the West Village is the picture of serene elegance. Built in 1846-47 in the Greek Revival style, the classical balance and symmetry of the façade mask a history full of controversy, including the birth of a notorious slur in American politics, which arguably changed the outcome of a pivotal presidential election.

Find out about the scandalous story

Architecture, Greenwich Village, Landmarks Preservation Commission, Union Square

Back in November, the developer/owner of a pair of newly-landmarked buildings at 827-831 Broadway–noted for their cast-iron architecture and a rich cultural history that includes serving as home to artist Willem de Kooningsubmitted a proposal for a four-story prismatic glass addition and landscaped roof terrace that architects DXA Studio say was influenced by de Kooning’s work. Yesterday, the Landmarks Preservation Commission received the proposal with mixed reviews, feeling skeptical about whether or not cultural events should influence a building’s architecture. After hearing testimony from a slew of local residents and preservationists who feel the glass topper is too large, the LPC decided to take no action on the plan, instead sending the team back to the drawing board to better detail the restoration aspects and reconsider the addition as perhaps shorter and further setback.

More details and renderings ahead

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Features, Greenwich Village, GVSHP, History

Fire Patrol House #2: From Benjamin Franklin’s fire prevention ideas to Anderson Cooper’s stylish home

By Andrew Berman of the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation, Thu, January 4, 2018

84 West 3rd Street, Fire Patrol #2, NYC firehouses, Greenwich Village fire patrol, Anderson Cooper firehouse

Fire Patrol #2 in 2009, via Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation Image Archive

The former firehouse located at 84 West 3rd Street in Greenwich Village is often noted for being the renovated and restored home of TV personality and journalist Anderson Cooper. But it’s just as noteworthy for an unusual history connected to Benjamin Franklin and insurance underwriters, and for not being the kind of firehouse you think it is at all.

The whole history and current use

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Features, Greenwich Village, History, photography, The urban lens

Greenwich Village waterfront, Jack Dowling, GVSHP archive, NYC 1970s, NYC pier collapse

Abandoned buildings along the Christopher Street Pier. Ca. 1974. © Jack Dowling Collection for GVSHP.

6sqft’s series The Urban Lens invites photographers to share work exploring a theme or a place within New York City. In this installment, the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation shares a collection of archival images by Jack Dowling that documents the crumbling piers of Greenwich Village in the 1970s. Are you a photographer who’d like to see your work featured on The Urban Lens? Get in touch with us at [email protected].

The fetid smell of rotted wood and the Hudson River nearly rises from these photos of the sorry state of Greenwich Village’s collapsing piers in the 1970s. The contrast is stark between the neighborhood’s disinvested, abandonment, pictured here, and its current culture of high rents and pricey coffee shops. Among New York City’s main concerns when photographer Jack Dowling created, “Decay and Rebirth Along the Greenwich Village Waterfront in the 1970s,” were its murder rate and the looming threat of bankruptcy when these photos have taken; the city as a whole has changed drastically in the decades since.

The visible difference from the present is astounding

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East Village, Features, Greenwich Village, GVSHP, History, West Village 

What lies below: NYC’s forgotten and hidden graveyards

By Andrew Berman of the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation, Thu, December 21, 2017

Zoom of the 1852 Dripps map of Manhattan, showing the proximity of downtown cemeteries, via David Rumsey Map Collection

Most New Yorkers spend some time underground every day as part of their daily commute, but some spend eternity beneath our streets, and in a few cases occupy some pretty surprising real estate.

Manhattan cemeteries are tougher to get into than Minetta Tavern without a reservation on a Saturday night because as far back as 1823, New York forbade new burials south of Canal Street. In 1851 that prohibition was extended to new burials south of 86th Street, and the creation of new cemeteries anywhere on the island was banned. But thousands of people were buried in Manhattan before those restrictions went into effect. And while some gravesites remain carefully maintained and hallowed ground, such as the those at St. Mark’s in the Bowery Church on Stuyvesant Street, Trinity Church on Wall Street, and St Paul’s Church at Fulton and Broadway, others have been forgotten and overlaid with some pretty surprising new uses, including playgrounds, swimming pools, luxury condos, and even a hotel named for the current occupant of the White House.

Read more

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Features, Greenwich Village, GVSHP, History, Transportation

NYC’s first elevated train and the world’s first streetcar began in Greenwich Village

By Andrew Berman of the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation, Thu, December 14, 2017

A streetcar at Madison and 4th Avenue in 1890. Via MCNY.

Greenwich Village is known as the birthplace of many things – the modern gay rights movement, Off-Broadway theater, the New York School of artists and poets, the “new urbanism” pioneered by Jane Jacobs, among many other trailblazing firsts. Less closely associated with the Village, however, are radical and transformative innovations in transportation technology. But while little known, the Village was in fact home to the first elevated rail line, and the first streetcar.

The whole history right this way

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