Landmarks Preservation Commission

Landmarks Preservation Commission, Midtown

All renderings courtesy of Tishman Speyer

A popular New York City observation deck will soon offer a new point of view. The Landmarks Preservation Commission on Tuesday unanimously approved plans for several upgrades to the Top of the Rock at 30 Rockefeller Plaza, including a rotating ride, a rooftop beacon, and a new “skylift” viewing platform that takes visitors above the 70th floor and offers uninterrupted 360-degree views.

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Brooklyn, Crown Heights, Landmarks Preservation Commission

All renderings courtesy of Morris Adjmi Architects via the Landmarks Preservation Commission

A coalition of Crown Heights residents and preservationists last week filed a lawsuit against the Landmarks Preservation Commission for approving a major residential project on a historic Brooklyn property. Developed by Hope Street Capital and designed by Morris Adjmi Architects, 959 Sterling Place (aka 920 Park Place) consists of a seven-story complex with 158 apartments and community space that will replace a landmarked 19th-century building. On Friday, attorneys representing the coalition of opponents filed a lawsuit against the LPC and Hope Street Capital, claiming the commission violated the law by failing to hold a public hearing.

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Architecture, Design, Landmarks Preservation Commission, Upper West Side 

All renderings designed by Foster+ Partners, courtesy of the Landmarks Preservation Commission

A plan funded by one of the world’s wealthiest people and designed by one of the world’s most famous architects still can’t get approved in New York City. Billionaire Bill Ackman on Tuesday presented to the Landmarks Preservation Commission his plan to construct a new glass penthouse addition designed by Norman Foster on top of a 100-year-old Upper West Side co-op building where he owns an apartment. After hours-long public testimony, LPC Chair Sarah Carroll sent Ackman and his team back to the drawing board, calling for a scaled-down design.

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Architecture, Landmarks Preservation Commission, Murray Hill

Photo: George Comfort & Sons via Landmarks Preservation Commission

One of Manhattan’s grandest lobbies is officially a New York City landmark. The Landmarks Preservation Commission voted to designate the ornate, T-shaped first-floor lobby of 200 Madison Avenue on Tuesday. Designed by Warren & Wetmore in 1925–the firm behind Grand Central Terminal–the Murray Hill lobby features a 200-foot-long through-block arcade that boasts a beautiful vaulted ceiling, polished marble walls, and other stunning elements reflective of the era.

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Landmarks Preservation Commission, Midtown

All renderings courtesy of Tishman Speyer

One of the city’s most popular observation decks could be getting a facelift. Tishman Speyer Properties has proposed several enhancements to the Top of the Rock deck at landmarked 30 Rockefeller Plaza, including a rotating attraction that lets visitors recreate the iconic “Lunch atop a Skyscraper” photo, a kinetic globe, and a new viewing platform on the 70th floor. The proposal was recommended for approval by Manhattan Community Board 5 last week and will be heard by the Landmarks Preservation Commission on Tuesday.

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Landmarks Preservation Commission, Queens

Street view of proposed Cambria Heights 222nd Street Historic District; Map data © 2021 Google

The Landmarks Preservation Commission on Tuesday voted to calendar two historic districts in the Queens neighborhood of Cambria Heights. The proposed 222nd Street Historic District and the 227th Street Historic District contain a total of 96 intact Tudor Revival rowhouses that incorporate the whimsical Storybook style. One of several prosperous Black communities in southeastern Queens, Cambria Heights is home to many single-family homes, but the two blocks considered for landmark status stand out for their architectural integrity and cohesiveness, according to the commission.

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Landmarks Preservation Commission, Museums, Upper West Side 

View along West 76th Street looking northeast. Rendering by Alden Studios for Robert A.M. Stern Architects, courtesy of the New-York Historical Society and NYC Landmarks Preservation Commission.

The New-York Historical Society, the oldest museum in the city, recently unveiled to the Landmarks Preservation Commission plans to expand by more than 70,000 square feet with a five-story extension at the rear of its Upper West Side lot. The $140 million expansion will be designed by architect Robert A.M. Stern and include additional classrooms and gallery space, as well as a permanent home for the American L.G.B.T.Q.+ Museum, the city’s first museum dedicated to L.G.B.T.Q. history and culture, as the New York Times first reported.

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Landmarks Preservation Commission, Museums, Upper West Side 

Renderings courtesy of NYC Parks/ AMNH

The New York City Public Design Commission on Monday approved plans to remove and relocate the Theodore Roosevelt statue from the steps of the American Museum of Natural History, about a year after officials called for the controversial sculpture to be taken down. The city’s Parks Department and AMNH presented their proposal last week to the Landmarks Preservation Commission, but the agency was unable to reach a decision. On Monday, The PDC voted unanimously to remove and relocate the statue to a relevant cultural institution.

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Chinatown, History, Landmarks Preservation Commission

Photo by Ken Lund on Flickr

New York City gained its first landmark related to Chinese American history and culture on Tuesday. The Landmarks Preservation Commission voted to designate the Kimlau War Memorial, a tribute to Chinese American veterans located in Chinatown. Designed by architect Poy Gum Lee, the memorial honors Americans of Chinese descent who died during World War II and has served as a gathering place for veterans.

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Harlem, Landmarks Preservation Commission

Courtesy of the Landmarks Preservation Commission

The Landmarks Preservation Commission on Tuesday voted to designate the Dorrance Brooks Square Historic District, an architecturally intact area of Harlem associated with notable Black Americans. The district is anchored by Dorrance Brooks Square, a small park named for a member of the Harlem Hellfighters who died in active combat during World War I. When it was dedicated by the city in 1925, the square became the first in New York City to honor a Black serviceman. The historic district designated on Tuesday is the first in the city to be named after an African American, according to the LPC.

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