All posts by Jason Carpenter

Jason is a New York writer who has contributed to many design, renovation, and real estate publications including This Old House, Home, and Habitat magazine. He was a founding editor of The Franklin Report, a home design guide in New York, Chicago and Los Angeles. He’s also a ghost writer of numerous business and health books, as well as a producer of web documentaries and how-to videos. Jason’s work has appeared in a wide range of publications ranging from Consumer Reports to Maxim to Businessweek. Follow him on Twitter @carpyeditor.

Architecture, History, Midtown East

Citigroup center nyc

When it comes to skyscrapers, we put a lot of trust in architects. We have to trust that they know what they’re doing, and these seemingly impossible buildings are safe to be in and around. It’s even harder to trust what used to be known as the Citicorp or Citigroup Center, now 601 Lexington Avenue, whose bottom floors are like four stilts, holding 50 stories of building above them. It looks like a strong wind would blow the whole structure over. And when the building was constructed in 1977, before some emergency repairs, that was true.

The dangerous details after the break

Architecture, Getting Away, History

great gatsby mansions, gold coast mansions, long island mansions, leonnardo dicaprio, leonardo dicaprio great gatsby

F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby is an immortal novel about Long Island millionaires in the Roaring Twenties, inspired by actual parties Fitzgerald attended at the time. The Jazz Age mansions of Long Island’s “Gold Coast” certainly represent a bygone era, but you can still visit several of these Gatsby-esque architectural relics today.

Plan your architecture day trip here

Design, Manhattan, Queens

noahs ark, austin mergold architects, socrates sculpture park, giant noah's ark, nyc sculptures

The NYC parks system gives artists a public canvas for their sculpture and design work, and there are so many great artworks on display this summer. From abstract sculptures to innovative park design, here are just a few of the interesting sculptures and design exhibits you can see in New York City parks this last month of summer.

Find the best public sculptures here

Architecture, Brooklyn, Design, History, Manhattan

Banking made this town, and the bank buildings of the 19th and early 20th centuries continue to house some of New York’s most classic architecture and design. Greek, Roman, and even Byzantine Revival architectures were the style of choice for bank buildings, and those great stone pillars are still worth visiting today. Ahead are some of the most beautiful former bank buildings in New York City.

See these beautiful bank buildings here

Featured Story

Architecture, Features, History, Manhattan

architecture day trip nyc

New York has a long history of great architecture. From the very beginnings in the colonial period to today, there are more great buildings to see in New York than anywhere else on the planet. Thankfully, with this guide, you can see them all in one simple south-north trip across Manhattan. Many great buildings are too tall or difficult to see up close, so we’ve chosen an example of each style of New York architecture that can also be appreciated from the ground level, rather than forcing you to gawk straight up at a skyscraper. Check out our New York architecture day trip.

Get your itinerary here

Featured Story

Architecture, Features, History

Flashback: See The New York Skyline Change Over 150 Years

By Jason Carpenter, Sat, July 12, 2014

nyc skyline 1900s, nyc 1920, historic nyc, old nyc skyscrapers

The New York skyline is made up of twelve different decades of buildings, but when you look at them today, they all form a single beautiful picture. Over the last century and a half, that picture has changed dramatically. From the original skyscraper boom to the modern glass towers of today, the New York skyline has grown more and more impressive every year, and these pictures show the process step-by-step, as well as the impending future.

See our historic New York skyline photos here

Getting Away, Hamptons, Starchitecture

The original Furniture House was built in Yamanashi, Japan in 1995, but the design has evolved since then.

Shigeru Ban‘s star has risen, and his 2014 Pritzker Prize is attracting attention to all his designs, like the recently opened Cast Iron House. But did you know that one of his lesser known works lies just outside of New York City? If you’re looking for a reason to get out of town, and would like to see one of Ban’s homes up close, then all you have to do is take a drive to the Hamptons.

See our gallery of the building here

Featured Story

Architecture, Features, History, Manhattan

This photo from 1909 shows the Manhattan Bridge under construction.

As the Freedom Tower is being completed, New Yorkers are losing a once-in-a-lifetime photo opportunity: The chance to snap pictures of a landmark while it is still being built. It is incredible to imagine getting to see a half-built Empire State Building, or a mess of wires that will soon be the Manhattan Bridge, or an excavated hole in the ground where Rockefeller Center will soon be placed. With old photos, we can see what these buildings looked like before they were finished, and what New York looked like before its landmarks were in place.

See what the landmarks of New York looked like in-construction here

Design, Manhattan

high line benches

On an average workday in New York, over 3.9 million people crowd onto the tiny island of Manhattan. That’s a lot of behinds needing a seat, and the city provides plenty of those in the form of benches. But not all benches are created equal. There are gems hidden in every borough – beautiful, funky, unique slabs for you to sit on this summer.

See more fantastic benches here

Featured Story

Architecture, Features, History, Manhattan, Midtown East

A model home at the Usonian Exhibition Pavilion in NYC

Frank Lloyd Wright is one of architecture’s most important figures, and you can see his work in five countries and 37 of 50 states. But when it comes to New York City, there is only one major Wright construction to be found: The Guggenheim. There is also a pre-fab house in Staten Island and one in Blauvelt just north of the city, but what other work did he do in the five boroughs? It turns out that Wright designed two other major projects in NYC, but both have been demolished. Here’s a look at these lost works by the great architect.

See the historic Frank Lloyd Wright works here

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Archtober2020