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Architecture, Features, History

The Wild and Dark History of the Empire State Building

By Rebecca Paul, Fri, August 29, 2014

Known for its record-breaking height and sophisticated art deco style, the Empire State Building is one of New York City’s most recognized landmarks. While the building is often used in popular culture as light-natured fodder—such as the opening back drop to your favorite cookie-cutter rom-com or the romanic meeting spot for star-crossed lovers—the building’s past is far more ominous than many of us realize. From failed suicide attempts to accidental plane crashes, its history casts a vibrant line-up of plot-lines and characters spanning the past ninety years.

Read about the dark side of the empire state building

Architecture, Downtown Brooklyn, New Developments, Rentals, Urban Design

388 Schermerhorn Street, Dattner Architects, Brooklyn, skyscraper, Downtown Brooklyn

L to R: Williamsburg Savings Bank (One Hanson), The Brooklyner, 388 Bridge Street, Avalon Willoughby West, The Hub

Construction filings from the Department of Buildings have revealed that Douglas Steiner’s mixed use tower at 333 Schermerhorn Street, dubbed the Hub, will soar 30 feet higher than previously reported; making it the top contender for Brooklyn’s tallest building at 607-feet.

For more than 80 years, the title of Brooklyn’s tallest belonged to the 512-foot Williamsburg Savings Bank tower at 1 Hanson Place. With its beloved 4-sided clock tower and its majestic banking hall, the tower has stood in relative isolation since its construction in 1929. Bruce Ratner’s Atlantic Yards centerpiece building nicknamed “Miss Brooklyn,” was the first to challenge the tower’s dominance and was slated to soar more than 100-feet above the bank building’s dome. The proposal incited uproar from Brooklynites, leading to its eventual downsizing in 2006 to 511-feet, just one foot shorter than the neighboring bank building.

More about The Hub and Brooklyn’s tallest this way