80 South Street

Financial District, New Developments

80 south street tower, city planning commission, air rights

Diagram of 80 South Street proposal, via Oceanwide Holdings

After a long-planned but never executed plan to develop buildings at 80 South Street and 163 Front Street in the South Street Seaport, the site’s owner has officially filed demolition permits at both buildings, Curbed learned. As 6sqft previously covered, the Howard Hughes Corporation sold 80 South Street to China Oceanwide Holdings for $390 million last March. Although the developer hasn’t released construction plans yet, the building is expected to be 113 stories tall, reaching an impressive 1,436 feet (to give you an idea of just how tall this is, 432 Park is 1,396 feet tall, and One World Trade Center is 1,368 feet tall by roof height).

More details ahead

Featured Story

Architecture, Battery Park City, Carter Uncut, Features, Financial District, History, opinion, Urban Design

Skyline Wars: In Lower Manhattan, A New Downtown Is Emerging

By Carter B. Horsley, Mon, April 18, 2016

carters view downtown manhattan

Carter Uncut brings New York City’s latest development news under the critical eye of resident architecture critic Carter B. Horsley. This week Carter brings us his fourth installment of “Skyline Wars,” a series that examines the explosive and unprecedented supertall phenomenon that is transforming the city’s silhouette. In this post Carter looks at the evolution of the Lower Manhattan skyline.

Lower Manhattan at the start of the Great Depression was the world’s most famous and influential skyline when 70 Pine, 20 Exchange Place, 1 and 40 Wall Street, and the Woolworth and Singer buildings inspired the world with their romantic silhouettes in a relatively balanced reach for the sky centered around the tip of Lower Manhattan.

Midtown was not asleep at the switch and countered with the great Empire State, the spectacular Chrysler and 30 Rockefeller Plaza but they were scattered and could not topple the aggregate visual power and lure of Lower Manhattan and its proverbial “view from the 40th floor” as the hallowed precinct of corporate America until the end of World War II.

The convenience and elegance of Midtown, however, became increasingly irresistible to many.

More on the the history of Lower Manhattan and what’s in store

Architecture, Financial District, New Developments

80 south street tower, city planning commission, air rights

The sale of 80 South Street from Howard Hughes Corp. to China Oceanwide Holdings has been finalized, reports The Real Deal. The $390 million deal was first announced in August, but closing was contingent on Howard Hughes transferring an additional 303,113 square feet in air rights to the address after already securing 104,167 square feet. With this, 80 South Street’s development potential has grown to 817,784 square feet and a tower of 1,436 feet (to put this in perspective, 432 Park is 1,396 feet tall, while 1 WTC is 1,368 feet tall by roof height) with 113 floors could soon rise on the site which has sat in redevelopment limbo for over a decade.

more here

condos, New Developments, South Street Seaport

80 south street new york

Rendering created by CityRealty based on the reported height

There’s no slowing down the city’s supertall boom. Crain’s reports yet another 1,000-foot plus tall tower could soon be joining the New York City skyline, rising at the combined sites of 80 South Street and 163 Front Street. Chinese investment company China Oceanwide Holdings released a statement saying they would be purchasing the development parcels for $390 million through a U.S. subsidiary from current owner Howard Hughes Corporation. The new tower will sit just south of the South Street Seaport, and amid a grouping of other tall, but not quite as tall, towers.

FInd out more here

Featured Story

Architecture, Features, Major Developments, New Developments

Living In the Sky, tallest buildings in NYC, supertalls, NYC skyscrapers

We recently brought you parts one and two of our tallest residential skyscrapers series, which totaled 63 projects poised to scrape the sky. But this list doesn’t even take into consideration the development boom occurring in Jersey City, unreleased plans on the drawing board, and the numerous office and hotel projects also rising throughout the city. So here you have it, part three of the series to complete our look at NYC skyscrapers.

Check out the list here

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