Transportation

Brooklyn, Transportation

brooklyn heights promenade, bqe, brooklyn heights

Brooklyn Heights Promenade via Wikimedia

The Brooklyn Heights Promenade could close for six years while the city rehabilitates a 1.5 mile stretch of the crumbling Brooklyn-Queens Expressway (BQE), transportation officials announced Thursday. According to Politico, the city’s transportation department unveiled two plans for revamping the Brooklyn Heights and DUMBO section of the BQE, which supports the promenade. The options include a quicker, six-year plan to divert cars to an elevated highway next to the Promenade or replace the BQE lane by lane, which could take up to eight years.

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New Jersey, Transportation

Via Wikimedia

New Jersey Transit announced Thursday it will offer discount fares for three months as it reduces train service to and from New York Penn Station. In addition to its already diminished service, the agency plans to cancel 18 daily trains on five lines and suspend all train service on a short rail segment in Princeton. There will also be no weekend service on the Gladstone Branch of the Morris & Essex line. All fares will be cut by 10 percent from November through January, Bloomberg reported.

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maps, Transportation

Last month, Citi Bike rolled out 200 pedal-assist electric bikes in New York City. As one can imagine, demand is high for these e-bikes, which can reach speeds of 18 miles per hour and will most likely get riders to their destinations faster than the subway. A new map, aptly named “I Want to Ride an Electric Citi Bike,” displays which docking stations have electric bikes at any given time (h/t Maps Mania). Users can find stations near them on the map, add them to a watch list, and be alerted within 10 seconds of its availability.

Get riding

Featured Story

Features, real estate trends, Top Stories, Transportation, Upper East Side, yorkville

Second Avenue Subway, 96th Street, Yorkville subway

Photo via Flickr cc

For over a decade, a large swath of the Upper East Side was under construction, but for many residents, it felt more like being under attack. As the Q Line was being built—after a century-long wait—the neighborhood not only had to tolerate restricted traffic along Second Avenue above ground but also more dramatic interruptions. Indeed, at one point in the subway line’s construction, underground explosions even shattered the windows of several local businesses. But with the noise, traffic, and disarray of the Second Avenue Subway in the past, the surrounding neighborhood has already quickly bounced back. As per predictions, since the completion of the line, real estate values, volume of sales, and rental prices in Yorkville have experienced an upswing.

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Transportation

Via Dan Phiffer on Flickr

Signal problems caused subway train delays during morning rush hour every weekday during the month of August except one day, according to a report released last week by the Riders Alliance. Between 6 am and 10 am each weekday morning, except on Thursday, Aug. 23, the Metropolitan Transportation Authority issued a delayed train alert. Every line except the L train experienced signal and/or mechanical problems during one or more of the 23 morning rush hours last month, WNYC reported.

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Transportation

Delayed train? MTA is on it (within the next 5 to 10 years)

By Devin Gannon, Fri, September 14, 2018

Via rhythmicdiaspora on Flickr

In August, Twitter users shamed the Metropolitan Transportation Authority for vaguely announcing a tunnel closure on Twitter in the middle of Monday morning rush hour. And this month, the MTA is facing backlash after being too honest with its commuters. One straphanger tweeted at the agency, “The @MTA really needs to get its shit together. People got places to go.” In response, whoever was running the agency’s NYCT Subway Twitter promised they are working on “fixing things within the next 5-10 years with our Fast Forward Plan.” That post did not bode well.

Not so Fast Forward

Transportation

L train, nyc subway, mta

Via Wikimedia

Several bills were passed in New York City Council on Wednesday to help address the inconvenience and traffic chaos expected during the planned 15-month L train tunnel closure for repairs due to damage from Hurricane Sandy, slated to begin in April 2019. The legislation calls for information centers in both Brooklyn and Manhattan, complaint investigation resources, and the fast-tracking of a new electric bus fleet, Curbed reports.

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Financial District, Transportation

Artist Ann Hamilton in front of her mosaic as a 1 train pulls into the new WTC Cortlandt Street station, via MTA Flickr

Three days before the 17th anniversary of the September 11th attacks, the Cortlandt Street subway station that was destroyed that day will reopen as the last piece of the WTC site. The MTA announced today that the new 1 train station, now dubbed WTC Cortlandt, will be back in use tomorrow, Saturday, September 8th, at noon.

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Major Developments, Midtown West, More Top Stories, Transportation

Rendering via the Governor’s office

At a well-timed press event this morning, Governor Cuomo touted the state’s $100 billion building program, the largest in the nation, and said if elected for another term, he’d increase that commitment to $150 billion. Among the many airport redesigns and the subway emergency plan, perhaps no project is more dear to Cuomo’s heart than that of Penn Station. And after a tour of the Moynihan Train Hall, on budget and on track to open by the end of 2020, the Governor announced that the dire safety, security, and circulation situation at Penn Station cannot wait two more years.

While construction wraps up at the LIRR and Amtrak’s future home, the state will build a new LIRR facility in the existing Penn Station. The proposal will double access to the trains with new entrances and an enlarged concourse and will create a permanent public plaza at 33rd Street and 7th Avenue.

All the renderings and details ahead

Brooklyn, Transportation

G train Smith-Ninth

Via Wikimedia

Making weekend plans in Brooklyn this month will be a bit trickier than normal. The Metropolitan Transportation Authority is suspending service between Bed-Stuy’s Bedford-Nostrand station and Long Island City’s Court Square station every weekend in September for “track maintenance.” There will be free shuttle buses available for North Brooklyn-bound straphangers (h/t Brooklyn Paper).

OH G

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