Transportation

City Living, Transportation

Photo by Marc A. Hermann / MTA New York City Transit on Flickr

For the first time since the start of the pandemic, the New York City subway saw over 3.2 million riders in one day. Gov. Kathy Hochul and the Metropolitan Transportation Authority on Friday announced 3,236,904 customers rode the subway on October 14, passing the previous record made a week prior by 50,000 customers. The record set last week still remains far below pre-pandemic levels; average weekday ridership regularly exceeded 5.5 million trips before Covid.

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Policy, Queens, Transportation

Cuomo’s $2.1B LaGuardia AirTrain project is halted

By Michelle Cohen, Wed, October 13, 2021

Rendering courtesy of Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s Office

The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey announced Tuesday that it would be putting the brakes on any further development of the AirTrain, the proposed 1.5-mile elevated rail that would run between the airport and the eastern Queens neighborhood of Willets Point, with a connection to the subway and Long Island Rail Road. The project was a top priority for former Gov. Andrew Cuomo. His successor, Gov. Kathy Hochul, has called for a review of alternatives to the project in response to opposition by community groups and local officials who have criticized its environmental review process, its impact on the surrounding community, and a dearth of alternatives being discussed.

Is it the end of the line for AirTran?

Policy, Transportation

Photo: Transportation Alternatives

In the summer of 2020, Mayor Bill de Blasio announced the city would close 100 miles of streets to cars for use by pedestrians, a policy formed in response to the pandemic and the need for safe, socially distanced outdoor space. Over a year later, just over 24 miles of Open Streets are currently active, according to a report released this week by the advocacy group Transportation Alternatives (TA).

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Art, East Village, Transportation, Williamsburg

© Marcel Dzama, NYC Transit Bedford Avenue Station. Commissioned by MTA Arts & Design. Photo: MTA Arts & Design/ Kris Graves.

This week, the MTA unveiled two new mosaic series at the 1st Avenue and Bedford Avenue L train stations. In the East Village, artist Katherine Bradford created Queens of the Night, a fanciful tribute to the creatives and essential workers (depicted as superheroes) who ride the L train. And in Williamsburg, artist Marcel Dzama created No Less Than Everything Comes Together, a collection of theatric fairytale-like figures under the sun and moon.

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Policy, Transportation

The Brooklyn Bridge bike lane is finally open

By Devin Gannon, Wed, September 15, 2021

Photo by the New York City Department of Transportation on Flickr

A long-awaited two-way protected bike lane officially opened on the Brooklyn Bridge Tuesday. Advocated for years by cyclists, the new path replaces the innermost car lane of the Manhattan-bound side of the iconic bridge and leaves the existing elevated promenade for pedestrians only. Both foot and bike traffic on the bridge, nicknamed the “Times Square in the Sky,” skyrocketed in recent years, leading to dangerous, crowded conditions.

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Featured Story

Art, Features, Midtown, Transportation

Nick Cave, subway mosaic, 42nd Street Shuttle passage, NYC subway art

All photos © Dana Schulz for 6sqft

Artist Nick Cave is best known for his Soundsuits, wearable sculptures made of natural materials like dyed human hair and feathers that make noise when worn. For his latest endeavor, creating a public art piece for the passageway that connects the B, D, F, and M trains to the 42nd Street shuttle, Cave translated his Soundsuits into colorful, energetic mosaics of dancers in Soundsuits made of raffia and fur. According to the New York Times, the $1.8M project was commissioned by MTA Arts & Design as part of the larger $250 million undertaking to revamp the shuttle. In addition to more than 24 intricate mosaics, Cave’s piece, titled “Every One,” includes a series of 11 digital screens that play videos of people in actual Soundsuits dancing.

See the mosaics here

Staten Island, Transportation

Photo: NYC Ferry

Starting next week, commuters from Staten Island will have another way to get to Manhattan. Launching Monday, August 23, the newest NYC Ferry route takes riders up the Hudson River for the first time and stops in Midtown West, with a total travel time of about 35 minutes from St. George. With this latest route, NYC Ferry now officially serves all five boroughs.

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Staten Island, Transportation

staten island ferry, romantic nyc spots, nyc ferry

Photo by Natalie Maguire via Flickr cc

In 2019, the Staten Island Ferry served 70,000 passengers on an average weekday, running at least every 30 minutes all 24 hours. But in March 2020, the Department of Transportation reduced service to only once per hour due to declining ridership during the pandemic. Starting today, though, full service is resuming. “The Staten Island Ferry knits this city together, and the return of 24/7 half-hour service is a sure sign that a recovery for all of us is underway,” said Mayor Bill de Blasio.

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Policy, Queens, Transportation

Rendering courtesy of Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s Office

The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey can move forward with its proposal to build a $2.1 billion AirTrain to LaGuardia Airport, the Federal Aviation Administration announced on Tuesday. The 1.5-mile elevated rail would run between the airport and the eastern Queens neighborhood of Willets Point, with a connection to the subway and Long Island Rail Road. The agency’s final decision was delayed last month after community groups and elected officials raised concerns about the review process and the logistics of building the AirTrain.

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Featured Story

Features, History, Transportation

Image via Rawpixel/ Wikimedia Commons

Nearly 150 years ago, something quite momentous happened in New York history: the first subway line was opened to the public. The system was the invention of Alfred Ely Beach and his company Beach Pneumatic Transit Company. Beach put up $350,000 of his own money to build the first prototype and tunnel and his company managed to put it together, somewhat covertly, in just 58 days. The tunnel measured about 312 feet long, eight feet in diameter, and was completed in 1870.

more on the history of NYC’s 1st subway line here

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