William Randolph Hearst

Celebrities, Historic Homes, Recent Sales, Upper West Side 

william randolph hearst, penthouses, 91 central park west

After nearly a year on the market, and a deal with Giorgio Armani that ultimately fell through, the ornate penthouse that previously belonged to publishing magnate William Randolph Hearst has finally sold. As reported by The Real Deal, the buyer of the magnificent home is John Legere, a T-Mobile CEO who entered contract to buy the pad back in July. Originally listed for $27.5 million, the home saw numerous price cuts over the last few months, ultimately settling on a $18 million price tag with Legere.

While the penthouse is not nearly as large as Hearst’s other former top floor spread (that one had an incredible 14,000 square feet of indoor and outdoor space!), this 1,600-square foot beauty maintains many spectacular details, including a wood-burning fireplace, herringbone floors, hand-carved wood doors, stained glass windows and a private terrace encompassing the entire frontage of its 91 Central Park West address.

Go inside the home

Daily Link Fix

Monastery of St. Bernard de Clairvaux
  • The Spotted Pig owners will officially open a four-story restaurant at the top of 70 Pine Street. [NYP]
  • William Randolph Hearst stored a 12th century Spanish monastery in a Brooklyn warehouse for 26 years. [Untapped]
  • Take a look inside this artist couple’s bright, floral, and fantastical Soho loft. [Curbed]
  • It’s that time of year again… dumpster diving season! Thank all the departing college kids. [DNAinfo]
  • When you’re done reading this book, you can plant it to grow a tree. [Treehugger]
  • Starchitect Rem Koolhaas thinks smart home technology in architecture is “potentially sinister.” [Dezeen]

Images: The Monastery of St. Bernard de Clairvaux via Wikimedia (L); Dumpster diving via Eco-Chick (R)

Real Estate Wire

University Heights Bronx
  • William Randolph Hearst’s penthouse apartment at 91 Central Park West is back on the market for $27.5 million after Giorgio Armani’s deal fell through. [Curbed]
  • An abandoned industrial lot on the Bronx waterfront could become the next mega residential development for $30 million. [NYDN]
  • Fifth Avenue is the world’s most expensive retail address, overtaking Hong Kong’s Causeway Bay as the frontrunner. [Bloomberg]
  • Williamsburg factory to become hedge fund CEO’s mansion. [Brownstoner]
  • Million Dollar Listing star Frederik Eklund announced that his team had more closings this year than any other in Douglas Elliman’s history. [TRD]
  • Upper East Side mansion full of art and artifacts once listed for $27 million is set to come back as a $65,000/month rental. [NYDN]

Images: Rendering of what could come to the Bronx waterfront via Greenberg Farrow (L); Fifth Avenue via Scorpions and Centaurs via photopin cc (R)

Featured Story

Cool Listings, Features, Manhattan, real estate trends

nyc luxury penthouse, million dollar listing, penthouse perfection

The penthouse craze began in the early 20th century thanks to media tycoon William Randolph Hearst. He took up residence in a three-floor apartment at the Clarendon at 137 Riverside Drive and, when his landlord refused to let him expand further, Hearst bought the entire building, adding two new floors to the top of his mansion, crowned by a new copper mansard roof.

Now, 100 years later, the rich and famous are still making headlines with their pricey penthouse purchases. Fellow media mogul Rupert Murdoch recently purchased a $57.25 million triplex penthouse, along with an additional full-floor unit (because why stop at just three?) at One Madison. His bachelor pad totals more than 10,000 square feet of interior space, wrapped in floor-to-ceiling glass. Is this the new standard for penthouse living? We’re taking a look at some of the top sky-high listings in Manhattan to find out.

Don’t miss these incredible penthouse stunners

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