West Farm Redevelopment Plan

affordable housing, Bronx, housing lotteries

1903 West Farms Road via JM Zoning

Seven years ago, what was then the largest Bronx rezoning ever was passed for a 17-acre, 11-block area in Crotona Park East. Known as the West Farms Redevelopment Plan, a development for the former industrial area by Dattner Architects, the complex will boast 1,325 units of affordable housing when complete, along with retail and community facilities. A year after the second affordable housing lottery at the site’s Compass Residences went live, the third is now up and running at 1903 West Farms Road. Designed in a similar basic-brick style by Dattner, this building has 152 units up for grabs for households earning 60 percent of the area median income, ranging from $865/month studios to $1,289/month three-bedrooms.

All the details

affordable housing, Bronx, housing lotteries

6sqft admin building bronx zoo

Photo @6sqft/Stephanie Hoina

Applications are currently being accepted for nine newly constructed affordable units at 866 East 178th Street in the West Farms section of the Bronx. West Farms, which underwent the largest private rezoning in the Bronx ever a few years ago, is located in the southwest of the borough. Residents here can enjoy plenty of green space with access to the Bronx Park, Zoo and the Bronx River. New Yorkers earning 80 percent of the area median income can apply to rent four one-bedrooms for $1,348 per month and five two-bedrooms for $1,521 per month.
Find out if you qualify

affordable housing, Bronx, housing lotteries

Compass Residences, Crotona Park East, West Farms Redevelopment Plan, 1544 Boone Avenue, Dattner Architects

Back in 2011, Dattner Architects created the West Farms Redevelopment Plan, a rezoning (the largest ever in the Bronx at the time) of a 17-acre, 11-block former industrial area in Crotona Park East. The plan calls for a total of 1,325 affordable housing units, 46,000 square feet of retail, and community facilities. Dattner’s first two buildings in the complex are called theCompass Residences, which provide 237 apartments arranged around a series of courtyards. This past December, 114 of these residences at 1544 Boone Avenue came online through the city’s affordable housing lottery, and now, 120 more at 1524 Boone Avenue are open to New Yorkers earning 60 and 90 percent of the area median income, ranging from $822/month studios to $1,740/month three-bedrooms.

Find out here if you qualify

Featured Story

adaptive reuse, affordable housing, Architecture, Bronx, Features, gentrification, Green Design

The south bronx , bronx grand concourse

Image: View Grand Concourse via photopin (license)

“Ladies and gentlemen, the Bronx is burning.” The infamous phrase, uttered in a 1977 broadcast of a Bronx fire, has stuck in the mind of many New Yorkers even today. Indeed, the Bronx saw a sharp decline in population and quality of life in the late 1960s and 1970s, which culminated in a wave of arson. By the early 1980s, the South Bronx was considered one of the most blighted neighborhoods in the country, with a 60 percent decline in population and 40 percent decline of housing units.

Although revitalization picked up by the ’90s, the Bronx never quite took off like its outer-borough counterparts Brooklyn and Queens. While media hype, quickly rising prices and a rush of development has come to characterize those two boroughs, the Bronx has flourished more quietly. The borough, nevertheless, has become home to growth and development distinct from the rest of New York City. Innovative affordable housing, adaptive reuse projects, green development and strong community involvement are redefining the area. As Bronx Borough President Ruben Diaz Jr. said during this Municipal Arts Society discussion in 2014, this is “The New Bronx.”

Keep Reading About What’s Going on in the Bronx


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