Thornton Tomasetti

Architecture, condos, hudson yards, Major Developments, Midtown West, New Developments, Rentals, Starchitecture

15-Hudson-Yards-Hudson-Yards-Tower-D-DSR-Relate-Oxford-

The foundation mat has been poured, and Hudson Yards‘ first residential building, Tower D at 15 Hudson Yards, is beginning its climb into the burgeoning far west side skyline. Situated alongside the High Line, at the northeast corner of West 30th Street and Eleventh Avenue, 15 Hudson Yards will house nearly 400 apartments and soar more than 900 feet high upon completion. Discounting the enormous spire on the New York Times Building, the tower will be for a short while the tallest building in Manhattan west of Eighth Avenue. It will also abut the Culture Shed, likely to be the city’s next great cultural venue.

The skyscraper will be the first of two residential towers that Related Companies and the Oxford Properties have planned for eastern rail yards. The second will be the 1,000-foot-tall 35 Hudson Yards, and they will join the 900-foot Coach Tower at 10 Hudson Yards and the 1,296-foot 30 Hudson Yards.

More details and renderings ahead

Architecture, Green Design

Metals in Construction, Reimagine a New York City Icon, MetLife Buidling, PanAm Building, VOA, Werner Sobek, SHoP, Heintges, CASE-RPI, StudioTJOA, FXFOWLE, Thornton Tomasetti, Dagher Engineering, AECOM, Lemay

Earlier this week, the six finalists in the “Reimagine a New York City Icon” competition were announced (h/t NY Yimby). The competition to reimagine the MetLife Building, sponsored by Metals in Construction magazine and the Ornamental Metal Institute of New York, isn’t part of any real-life plans for the iconic Midtown tower, but when great minds get to this kind of imagining, great ideas are born. Architects and engineers were asked to “reimagine 200 Park Avenue with a resource-conserving, eco-friendly enclosure—one that creates a highly efficient envelope with the lightness and transparency sought by today’s office workforce—while preserving and enhancing the aesthetic of the building’s heritage.”

Designed by Emery Roth & Sons, Pietro Belluschi, and Walter Gropius, the 59-story MetLife Building, located to the north of Grand Central Terminal, opened in 1963 as the Pan Am Building. MetLife bought the building in 1981, and though they sold it in 2005, the architectural icon keeps their name. Below are the finalists’ descriptions and renderings for the tower’s eco-friendly future.

See what the finalists came up with

Architecture, Construction Update, Downtown Brooklyn, Technology

B2 Tower, fluid harmonic disruptor, Downtown Brooklyn Development, Thornton Tomasetti

B2 Tower photo © Field Condition

“A new technology, designed to tame forces that could separate an astronaut’s eyeball from her retina, may also keep the one percent from throwing up,” says The Real Deal. They’re talking about a fluid harmonic disruptor, a device used during space takeoffs to protect astronauts from violent vibrations, which will be employed by structural engineering firm Thornton Tomasetti at Forest City Ratner’s B2 BKLYN, the 32-story modular tower at Pacific Park that could definitely succumb to queasy-making swaying and vibrations. The firm will put six water-filled pipes on the roof of the building, making up 0.5 percent of its total mass; then the disruptor will alter how the fluid, and therefore the building, reacts to wind and other vibrations.

More details ahead

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