The New York Times

Featured Story

Features, History, photography, The urban lens

Pressroom. Numbering cast plates with page numbers for identification.

In September 1942, with humanity in the throes of WWII, one Marjory Collins photographed the inner workings of the New York Times for the U.S. Office of War Information. Her photos depict a culture of white men and machines working at individual tasks for the greater goal of creating the day’s paper. The press printing process shown is a world apart from today’s digital media industry, where so many human jobs have been antiquated by more advanced technology, which is, thankfully, more diverse.

See all the photos

Featured Story

Architecture, Features, Financial District, History

Image via Library of Congress

While the news industry today continues to shift from bustling offices to laptops in coffee shops, it may be hard to imagine that the publishing industry was at the epicenter of some of the world’s most important architectural feats. But this was the case in late 19th century New York City, when the daily newspaper industry was centered at Park Row, near City Hall. Such institutions included The New York Times, The New York Tribune and The New York World. 

Take a trip back in time with us and explore Newspaper Row

Brooklyn, City Living

brooklyn scene

“What’s next? Describing Manaus as the Williamsburg of the Amazon? Katmandu as the Cobble Hill of Nepal?” These are the questions posed by New York Times Standards editor Philip B. Corbett to his writers, who can’t seem to stop comparing everything in the world to Brooklyn. He references The Atlantic‘s article “All the Places The New York Times Has Compared to Brooklyn,” which points out that the paper has dubbed everywhere from the Hamptons and Maplewood to Stockholm and Beijing as Brooklyn. Two recent Times examples are the story declaring that Ridgewood is bringing Brooklyn to Queens and another story about Cape Town, South Africa comparing it to the borough on the other side of the world because of its “chic organic farms.”

While we’re not going to be too sad to see this trend go, we will miss the creative monikers that come with such comparisons. (Remember Quooklyn?)

[Via NY Times]

Image by Brandon King cc

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