Steinway Hall

condos, Midtown West, New Developments, Starchitecture

Manhattan’s Tallest Condominium Tower, Manhattan’s Tallest residential tower, shop architects, JDS Development Group, Property Markets Group, world's slenderest building, world's skinniest building

Poised to become the world’s skinniest tower and one of the hemisphere’s tallest, it’s no wonder that 111 West 57th Street will ask around $100 million for its condos, not to be outdone by other nine-digit supertalls like 220 Central Park South’s $175 million penthouse, the $150 million penthouse at the Sony Building, and One57′s record $100 million sale, which currently holds the title for the most expensive unit ever sold in the city.

Curbed has uncovered filings with the Attorney General’s office that show the preliminary price list for the SHoP-designed 1,421-foot tower, which is being developed by JDS Development Group and Property Markets Group. The records indicate that there will be condos in the landmarked Steinway Hall, as well in the tower addition. “The ‘landmark units’ will be smaller and cheaper, starting at $1 million for a studio, while the ‘tower units’ will start at $13 million for a three-bedroom.”

More details and the price list ahead

Featured Story

East Village, Features, History, Restaurants, Union Square

Luchow's

For those of us who came to the city within the past decade, it’s hard to imagine East 14th Street without its stretch of bulky NYU dorms, big-box supermarkets, and mini-chain restaurants. But of course this wasn’t always what the area looked like. In the late 19th century, the area centered around Irving Place, was full of entertainment venues like the Academy of Music, the city’s opera house, Steinway Hall, Tammany Hall, and the City Theatre movie house. And at the heart of it all was a restaurant that catered to both the theater crowd and the German population of the East Village–Luchow’s.

Luchow’s was established in 1882 at 110 East 14th Street at Irving Place when German immigrant August Lüchow purchased the café/beer garden where he worked as a bartender and waiter. It remained in operation for a full century, becoming an unofficial neighborhood and city landmark, until it was replaced by NYU’s University Hall dormitory.

Read the full history here