starchitecture

Architecture, Central Park South, Midtown West, New Developments, Starchitecture

111 West 57th Street, SHOP Architects, Billionaire's Row, Central Park apartments

Move over 432 Park, there’s a taller, slimmer and sexier ultra-luxury residential tower coming to Midtown. At the Municipal Art Society’s 2014 Summit for NYC, Simon Koster, Principal at JDS Development Group, provided the audience with a compelling presentation on how our ideals can serve as the basis in how we shape our city. The restored crown of Stella Tower, the East River mega-rental project at 616 First Avenue, and 111 West 57th Street’s discretionary approval by the Landmarks Preservation Commission were used as relevant examples.

And the 57th Street project really caught our eye. The 1,400+ foot tower will also become the slimmest building in the world with a slenderness ratio of 1:23. Its narrow profile and stepped crown evoke the romantic art-deco towers of the 1920s and ’30s and other timeless city landmarks. SHoP Architects are the designers and WSP Group are the engineers/magicians making sure things remain upright.

More on the tower here

Financial District, Major Developments, Starchitecture

Ground Zero Church, Santiago Calatrava, St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church

Ahead of the groundbreaking this weekend, a new video and renderings have been revealed for Santiago Calatrava‘s church near Ground Zero, which will overlook the 9/11 Memorial. The new St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church will be constructed of white Vermont marble, inspired by a mosaic of the Madonna and Child Enthroned at the Hagia Sophia in Istanbul.

More on the design here

Featured Story

Architecture, Features, History, Starchitecture

Frank Lloyd Wright Designs Destined for NYC But Never Built

By Jason Carpenter, Tue, September 2, 2014

frank lloyd wright skyscraper oklahoma, frank lloyd wright skyscraper, frank lloyd wright oklahoma, price tower, frank lloyd wright price tower, St. Mark's-in-the-Bouwerie Towers Aerial

Many wonder why such a prolific and famous architect as Frank Lloyd Wright didn’t have more buildings in New York City. It’s safe to say he wasn’t a huge fan of urban density, but how could one possibly create something as iconic as the Guggenheim’s spirals without getting any other work in the city? As we showed in a previous post, two Wright designs have actually been demolished. Now, we will look at the two buildings Wright intended for the New York area which were never fully realized—at least, not in Manhattan.

See the Frank Lloyd Wright designs here

Financial District, Major Developments, New Developments, Starchitecture

The latest in the world of New York City supertalls comes to us from New York YIMBY, who has revealed renderings for the Rafael Viñoly-designed 125 Greenwich Street. At 1,356 feet, it will become Downtown’s tallest residential tower, the first to rival the 57th Street skyscrapers like Extell’s planned Nordstrom Tower, which will rise 1,479 feet. It will also be just 12 feet shy of One World Trade Center’s roof, making it the second tallest skyscraper in the Financial District.

More details and renderings here

Featured Story

Features, Madison Square, real estate trends, Starchitecture

One Madison: A Modern Marvel on Madison Square

By Dana Schulz, Thu, August 28, 2014

One Madison , One Madison Triple Penthouse

When it comes to New York City real estate, many people liken fluctuating prices to the chicken-or-egg phenomenon: does a building transform a neighborhood or does construction follow the most up-and-coming areas?

In the case of One Madison, the super sleek 60-story, high-rise tower that is home to a media mogul, a supermodel, and star quarterback, gentrification had already taken hold in the larger NoMad area when construction began on the building in 2006.

Take a look at the towering building and how it became one of the city’s top-sellers

Chelsea, Cool Listings, Interiors, Meatpacking District, Starchitecture

100 Eleventh Avenue interiors, Jean Nouvel building, Jennifer Post interior renovation

Starchitect Jean Nouvel’s 100 Eleventh Avenue may have received mixed reviews—which is made even more evident when you look at its rocky listing history—but that doesn’t change the fact that this pad is a clear showstopper. Not only does the stunning full-floor penthouse offer 360 degrees of stellar views through 150 linear feet of floor-to-ceiling windows; have a sprawling layout and two terraces; and reside on one of New York’s most recognizable blocks, surrounded by buildings designed by Pritzker Prize winners like Frank Gehry and Shigeru Ban; but this unit also has recently renovated interiors courtesy of Jennifer Post, one of Architectural Digest’s top 100 designers. Bottom line, if you’re a big name-dropper, this $45,000/month rental has your name written all over it.

Check out the views from this incredible home here

Financial District, Major Developments, Starchitecture

Jean Nouvel, starchitect

Sharif El-Gamal, CEO of real estate developer Soho Properties, announced today that his company acquired 49-51 Park Place from Consolidated Edison for $10.7 million. He also confirmed that none other than Pritzker Prize-winning starchitect Jean Nouvel will be designing the site’s three-story Islam museum and prayer space.

More on the breaking development

Architecture, opinion, Starchitecture

Norman Foster, London Gherkin, Hearst Tower, starchitecture

So often it’s the starchitects who get a bad name–for ruining city skylines with their larger-than-life towers, for obscuring park views, or for neglecting to take into account their surroundings. But a new opinion piece in the New York Times by Allison Arieff argues that the blame can’t be solely placed on these so-called starchitects, but rather on the architecture community at large.

Read more about Arieff’s case here

Chelsea, New Developments, Starchitecture

520 west 28th, zaha hadid, starchitecture, starchitecture nyc, zaha hadid's first nyc project, zaha hadid nyc, related companies

Whether or not you’re a fan of Zaha Hadid, or Neo-Futurism for that matter, if you’re believer that a building’s interior should be a seamless extension of its exterior (read: not New York by Gehry), you’ll appreciate Zaha’s efforts to turn her High Line project into a work worthy of architecture history books. One of the most (if not the most) talked about starchitect projects planned for the elevated park, plenty of full view renderings have surfaced since it was announced just over a year ago. But it looks like we’re finally getting a taste of what the inside could look like, courtesy of Curbed. Like its ultra-futuristic exteriors, Zaha’s luxurious condos will be just as sleek and spaceship-like as the outside, with undulating surfaces all throughout, and featuring many of the mind-boggling forms we’ve come to appreciate Ms. Hadid for.

More views inside

Architecture, Chelsea, New Developments, Starchitecture

551West21 by Norman Foster, Norman foster, 551w21, starchitecture chelsea, foster+partners, 551w21

Many architects like to recycle their plans, reusing signature design elements from project to project. However, British architect Lord Norman Foster, with his firm Foster+Partners, enjoys keeping it fresh with designs that are unmistakably modern, yet profoundly contextual to their location. The firm’s latest New York development is a 44-unit residential tower named 551W21 that rises in the once industrial—now art-gallery—hub of West Chelsea.

The 551W21 team over at Foster+Partners recently sent us some new photos of the building under construction, which has surpassed its 19th-floor mark and will be topped off at the end of this month. And if you’re still not convinced that buyers are willing to pay a premium for starchitectured spaces, we’re told that the building is already over 50% sold.

See more photos and views after the break

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