South Street Seaport

condos, New Developments, South Street Seaport

80 south street new york

Rendering created by CityRealty based on the reported height

There’s no slowing down the city’s supertall boom. Crain’s reports yet another 1,000-foot plus tall tower could soon be joining the New York City skyline, rising at the combined sites of 80 South Street and 163 Front Street. Chinese investment company China Oceanwide Holdings released a statement saying they would be purchasing the development parcels for $390 million through a U.S. subsidiary from current owner Howard Hughes Corporation. The new tower will sit just south of the South Street Seaport, and amid a grouping of other tall, but not quite as tall, towers.

FInd out more here

Real Estate Wire

fraunces tavern museum, financial district, fidi, historic buildings, landmarked buildings
  • What’s believed to be the last horse auction building in the city (it’s also Frank Stella’s former East Village studio) is up for sale for $18 million. [EV Grieve]
  • Governor Cuomo allotted $6.2 million to 16 historic sites throughout the city that are still in need of repairs from Hurricane Sandy in 2012. [Gothamist]
  • The Chetrit Group got a $60 million loan for their Hudson Yards development site. [TRD]
  • Lowe’s is opening its first Manhattan store on the Upper West Side, but it will be a quarter of the size of the chain’s suburban outlets. [Bloomberg]
  • Landmarks voices concerns over Pier 17, part of the South Street Seaport redevelopment, for a glass rooftop canopy that may block views of the Brooklyn Bridge. [Curbed]

Images: Fraunces Tavern Museum, one of the 16 sites receiving funds (L); Pier 17 rendering via SHoP Architects (R)

Featured Story

Art, Art nerd ny, Events, Features

Rubin Museum Block party, Fort Gansevoort, CES, Joseph Gross Gallery, Queens Museum, Inclusive World, South Street Seaport, Waking Ned Devine, Seaport film fest, Annika Connor, The Hamptons, Aperture, black Mirror

In a city where hundreds of interesting happenings occur each week, it can be hard to pick and choose your way to a fulfilling life. Art Nerd‘s philosophy is a combination of observation, participation, education and of course a party to create the ultimate well-rounded week. Jump ahead for Art Nerd founder Lori Zimmer’s top end of week picks for 6sqft readers!

With the wonderful warm weather we’re experiencing right now, there’s really no excuse for not getting out of the house (and especially the office) and enjoying a night on the town. This week I’ve rounded up a flurry of indoor and outdoor events that will satiate your art sensibilities, film fancies, your need to groove, and your stomach!

Start the week’s end off right tonight by heading to two shows featuring work from art world up-and-comers and photos zooming in on our dystopian future. Then follow that up by chowing down on barbecue at Adam Shopkorn’s new food and art cultural hub—which happens to have found a fascinating home in an 1849 Greek Revival row house. On Friday, take in some bites, beverages and movie at the newly revamped South Street Seaport. On Saturday, put your dancing shoes on for an epic party at MoMA PS1 under the COSMO pavilion. And then use Sunday to chill out by fixing your gaze on Annika Connor’s lush, romantic paintings, or by taking the fam and some friends over to the Rubin Museum’s annual block party.

All the best events to check out here

Real Estate Wire

  • Republicans have a new plan to cut taxes for the top 0.2 percent. [Washington Post]
  • Is another building on the way for the South Street Seaport? [TRD]
  • Renderings revealed for a huge, blocky glass building coming to 57th Street. [Curbed]
  • Our favorite April Fools story today: Kanye West and Kim Kardashian buy entire NYC micro-apartment building to turn it into an “urban mega-mansion.” [Inhabitat NYC]
  • City disapproves ODA’s initial design for a new rental building in Bushwick at the former Rheingold Brewery site that includes a sloping, zig-zagging green roof. [TRD]
  • Downtown Brooklyn’s real estate boom is leading to major overcrowding in local public schools. [BK Mag]

Images: 606 West 57th Street via TF Cornerstone (L); Kim and Kanye (R)

Architecture, Major Developments, South Street Seaport, Urban Design

shop architects south street seaport

Rendering of the proposed tower

Less than a week after it was revealed that the Howard Hughes Corporation paid $31 million for more than 300,000 square feet of air rights at the South Street Seaport, it looks like the entire $1.5 billion redevelopment project could be stalled. The overall plan would breathe new life into the downtown historic district by rehabilitating crumbling piers, preserving and finding new use for landmark buildings and constructing a 42-story waterfront condo tower at the foot of Beekman Street. And it’s this last point that has local officials, civic groups, preservationists and some community residents worried or downright angry.

The 494-foot-tall, SHoP Architects-designed tower has already been scaled back from its original 650 feet, but concerned parties still feel that the building would “obscure views of the Brooklyn Bridge and clash with the low-scaled, early-19th-century brick buildings that make up the 11-block seaport district, once the center of the city’s maritime industry,” according to the New York Times.

More on the debate

New Developments, opinion, Polls, Starchitecture, Urban Design

Before 9/11, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum planned a new outpost on the East River in Lower Manhattan, sculpted by none other than starchitect Frank Gehry. But after the tragedy, the project was scratched. Now, the planned South Street Seaport project would replace the area’s main pier with a lower, glass structure that looks like a surburban mall at the base of a new 40-something-story tower on the former site of the Fulton Fish Market. But 6sqft’s Architecture Writer Carter B. Horsley thinks the Howard Hughes Corporation should abandon the current SHoP Architects-designed plan and replace it with a resurrected version of Gehry’s fabulous, titanium ribbon-laced Guggenheim vision. Do you agree?

Images: Guggenheim Bilbao by Frank Gehry via Wiki Commons (L); Current South Street Seaport plan via SHoP Architects (R)

[Related: Unleash Gehry: Give Frank the East River and Churn the Lower Manhattan Pot]

Featured Story

Carter Uncut, Features, New Developments, opinion, Starchitecture, Urban Design

frank gehry bilbao museum

Image: Frank Gehry against his design for the Guggenheim in Bilbao, Spain

The Foundation Louis Vuitton in the Bois de Bologne in Paris recently opened and was another kudo for architect Frank O. Gehry whose Bilbao, Spain, branch of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in 1999 was widely regarded as the most important architecture project since the opening of the Pompidou Center in Paris in 1975. All these projects are Deconstructivist; they don’t fit easily into boxes and are not symmetrical. Their aesthetic tends to be chaotic, disorganized, aggressive, random and definitely unconventional, but also absolutely heroic, proud and defiant.

The Pompidou Center was huge and intimidating, a gargantuan power plant for some unfinished but gaily painted super ocean liner. By comparison, the Guggenheim was a shiny swirl of silvery metal cascading by its riverfront location in a staccato flurry of flamenco stomps. Vuitton is a whole other gesture altogether; an organic amorphous form about to devour a city, formed of glass, wood and concrete in rearing and overlapping fashion, a mad dash about enclosure.

All of these might just amount to a sophisticated bowl of cherries for architecture aficionados, except that this project was a baby of Bernard Arnault, the head of the luxury conglomerate that runs not only Louis Vuitton, the purser, but also bubbler Moët & Chandon, sipper Hennessy, dazzler Bulgari and fashionistas Dior, Fendi and Givenchy—all One-Percent darlings. These, of course, are not the only platinum brands but they’ll certainly do in an all-so-sizzling and svelte pinch.

You may now ask what has all this to do with our city.

Read more here

Real Estate Wire

One Vanderbilt Avenue by kpf and sl green
  • Manhattan Community Boards 5 and 6 want to redesign SL Green’s 67-story One Vanderbilt tower. [NYP]
  • Fresh Direct breaks ground for its South Bronx headquarters, but locals protest that it will further damage the area’s air quality. [NYT]
  • An opinion on why the proposed megatower on the pier would ruin the South Street Seaport. [NY Mag]
  • Long Island City sees a rise in condo development. [Bloomberg]
  • West Village townhouse at 79 Horatio Street sells for $21 million, double what it sold for two years ago. [Curbed]

Images: One Vanderbilt (L); Long Island City (R)

Featured Story

Features, holidays

NY Stock Exchange Christmas Tree

New York Stock Exchange Christmas tree via Mille Fiori Favoriti

Last week, we took a look back at the history of the Rockefeller Center Christmas Tree to mark the annual lighting celebration. Though this is probably the most famous Christmas tree in the world, many of us jaded New Yorkers would rather not deal with the crowds and traffic jams that come with visiting Rock Center. So as an equally festive alternative, we’ve rounded up some of the other huge trees illuminating the city this holiday season.

Read more

Architecture, Major Developments, South Street Seaport, Urban Design

REVEALED: SHoP’s Scaled-Back South Street Seaport Tower

By Dana Schulz, Fri, November 21, 2014

SHoP Architects, Howard Hughes Corporation, South Street Seaportal

This week, the Howard Hughes Corporation gave a presentation to the South Street Seaport community about their residential tower planned for the waterfront beside Pier 17. The original design by SHoP Architects was 52 stories and 650 feet, but to satisfy concerns by neighborhood residents and elected officials about the tower’s appropriateness, the firm scaled back the design to 42 stories and agreed to also build a middle school and waterfront esplanade. But even this revised plan was met with much criticism at the community meeting; Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer and City Council member Margaret Chin both expressed that they would not support the tower and likened it to plopping a high-rise in the middle of Colonial Williamsburg.

The luxury residential tower is part of Howard Hughes’s overall $305 million plan for the Seaport, which, if approved, would include a restoration of the historic Tin Building and a new home for the Seaport Museum.

More details on the project and revised design

SIGN UP FOR OUR NEWSLETTERS

Thank you, your sign-up request was successful!
This email address is already subscribed, thank you!
Please provide a valid email address.
Please complete the CAPTCHA.
Oops. Something went wrong. Please try again later.