Silvercup West

Featured Story

Architecture, Carter Uncut, Features, Long Island City, Queens, Urban Design

Carter Uncut brings New York City’s latest development news under the critical eye of resident architecture critic Carter B. Horsley. Here, Carter brings us his sixth installment of “Skyline Wars,” a series that examines the explosive and unprecedented supertall phenomenon that is transforming the city’s silhouette. In this post Carter looks at the new towers defining the Queens skyline.

For a long time, the glass tower erected by Citibank was the lone skyscraper of note in Queens. Known initially as Citicorp at Court Square, it was built in 1989 and designed by Raul de Armas of SOM as a blue-green metal-panel-and-glass office tower with just a few setbacks at its 633-foot-high top—an extremely clean-cut, modern obelisk of fine proportions.

In a 1988 article in The New York Times, Anthony DePalma wrote that the tower “dominates the Queens skyline like a sequoia in the desert” and Paul Goldberger, then the newspaper’s architecture critic, wrote the tower was “rapidly becoming one of the most conspicuous structures in the entire city.” He added, “It is a very unlikely thing, this building—no other skyscraper in New York is remotely like the Citicorp tower, not so much for its design as for the fact that it stands free, alone in this landscape of gas stations, warehouses and row houses,”

The bank tower transformed “the landscape of New York” and “no longer does Manhattan virtually by itself control the skyline,” Mr. Goldberger continued. “Skyscrapers built at random all over New York would be devastating, but an occasional exclamation point, well designed and carefully placed, will do the skyline no grievous harm,” he concluded. This is a very important but also very controversial point as currently evidenced in Manhattan where traditional precincts are being pin-pricked to exhaustion and confusion by supertalls.

more on the queens skyline

Featured Story

Architecture, Features, Major Developments, New Developments, Starchitecture, Urban Design

NYC Construction, manhattan apartments, manhattan rentals, manhattan condos, skyscraper living

You’ve probably realized that New York is in the midst of a skyscraper boom, but if the ubiquitous scaffolding and sidewalk detours haven’t given it away, we bring you further proof — with part two of our series detailing the tallest residential towers set to rise high above the city, forever changing New York’s skyline.

Compared to the previous 26 projects — the tallest of the tall that included ultra-luxury and super-tall towers such as 432 Park Avenue and 125 Greenwich Street — this second batch is composed of smaller buildings ranging from 500 to 700 feet tall and features greater geographical diversity and lots more rentals. With developers scouring the city for less expensive areas to assemble properties, these often-controversial projects are slated to rise in some of our more human-scaled ‘hoods such as East Harlem, South Street Seaport, and Williamsburg.

Will they all get built? Unlikely, but in any case here’s our list

Real Estate Wire

Pacific Park Brooklyn, Greenland Forest City Partners, COOKFOX, Thomas Balsley
  • The state has gotten approval to seize seven sites for Forest City Ratner’s Pacific Park Brooklyn project (previously named Atlantic Yards). Tenants now have 90 days to vacate their units. [DNA Info]
  • The $1B three-tower expansion for Silvercup West is back on track. [Curbed]
  • Most of the world’s billionaires call NYC home. [TRD]
  • Winston Von Engel has been appointed as the new director of the New York City’s Department of City Planning’s Brooklyn office. [TRD]
  • The BAM Cultural District has received $131M from the city. [NYO]

Pacific Park/Atlantic Yards (left); What’s to come for the BAM Cultural District (right)

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