SHoP Architects

Architecture, Lower East Side, Major Developments, New Developments

First Four Essex Crossing Buildings Revealed

By Dana Schulz, Thu, January 15, 2015

Essex Crossing, SHoP Architects

Rendering via SHoP Architects

After 45 years of sitting vacant on the Lower East Side, the failed SPURA (Seward Park Urban Renewal Area) project site is being transformed to a $1.1 billion, 1.65 million-square-foot, mixed-use mega-development anchored by 1,000 residential units and a mix of cultural, community, and retail facilities. We’ve gotten snippets here and there on what the Essex Crossing project will look like–such as the Andy Warhol Museum and a 14-screen movie theater–but now Curbed has revealed renderings of the development’s first four buildings.

Construction on phase one of the project, which will occupy sites one, two, five and six (there are nine sites in total), is expected to commence this spring, and the notable architects who will spearhead the charge are SHoP, Handel Architects, Beyer Blinder Belle and Dattner Architects.

See what these architects have planned for Essex Crossing

Art, Lower East Side

Andy Warhol Museum

The Andy Warhol Museum via nooccar via photopin cc.

Since 1994, the 88,000-square-foot Andy Warhol Museum has been one of Pittsburgh’s main attractions, the largest museum in the country dedicated to a single artist. And though Warhol was born in Pittsburgh, he spent most of his formative years in New York City, a fact that has sparked plans for a satellite museum on the Bowery.

In Miami for Art Basel, museum director Eric Shiner told The Observer last night that the Lower East Side museum would be 10,000 square feet and part of the controversial Essex Crossing development. Its anticipated opening is 2017.

More details here

Architecture, Major Developments, South Street Seaport, Urban Design

REVEALED: SHoP’s Scaled-Back South Street Seaport Tower

By Dana Schulz, Fri, November 21, 2014

SHoP Architects, Howard Hughes Corporation, South Street Seaportal

This week, the Howard Hughes Corporation gave a presentation to the South Street Seaport community about their residential tower planned for the waterfront beside Pier 17. The original design by SHoP Architects was 52 stories and 650 feet, but to satisfy concerns by neighborhood residents and elected officials about the tower’s appropriateness, the firm scaled back the design to 42 stories and agreed to also build a middle school and waterfront esplanade. But even this revised plan was met with much criticism at the community meeting; Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer and City Council member Margaret Chin both expressed that they would not support the tower and likened it to plopping a high-rise in the middle of Colonial Williamsburg.

The luxury residential tower is part of Howard Hughes’s overall $305 million plan for the Seaport, which, if approved, would include a restoration of the historic Tin Building and a new home for the Seaport Museum.

More details on the project and revised design

Architecture, Central Park South, Midtown West, New Developments, Starchitecture

111 West 57th Street, SHOP Architects, Billionaire's Row, Central Park apartments

Move over 432 Park, there’s a taller, slimmer and sexier ultra-luxury residential tower coming to Midtown. At the Municipal Art Society’s 2014 Summit for NYC, Simon Koster, Principal at JDS Development Group, provided the audience with a compelling presentation on how our ideals can serve as the basis in how we shape our city. The restored crown of Stella Tower, the East River mega-rental project at 616 First Avenue, and 111 West 57th Street’s discretionary approval by the Landmarks Preservation Commission were used as relevant examples.

And the 57th Street project really caught our eye. The 1,400+ foot tower will also become the slimmest building in the world with a slenderness ratio of 1:23. Its narrow profile and stepped crown evoke the romantic art-deco towers of the 1920s and ’30s and other timeless city landmarks. SHoP Architects are the designers and WSP Group are the engineers/magicians making sure things remain upright.

More on the tower here

Architecture, New Developments, Upper East Side

1711 First Avenue, Upper East Side condos, SHoP Architects, Anbau Enterprises

Looks like the Upper East Side will be adding another luxury condo project to its roster–but this time it’s an “affordable luxury” building. Located at 1711 First Avenue at East 89th Street, the 34-story building is being designed by SHoP Architects for Anbau Enterprises, who has shared renderings of the project with New York YIMBY.

The building will have a bluestone base with a small cantilever over the 89th Street entrance. The rest of the façade will be brick and glass, offering floor-to-ceiling windows without the total curtain wall appearance. The western façade will be slightly glassier than the rest of the building.

More details here

Real Estate Wire

b2 , b2 modular tower, b2 tower, shop architects tower , atlantic yards, pacific park
  • It’s cheaper to buy than rent in a number of US cities. [Business Insider]
  • Forest City is suing Skanska over the Pacific Park (formerly the Atlantic Yards) B2 modular tower. Skanska issued a Stop Work Order last week over cost overruns, and Forest City is now countering with a lawsuit saying Skanska agreed to a “fixed price” and any issues are due to the builder’s own “failures and missteps”. [Curbed]
  • The New York Times Editorial Board is in favor of cutting deals with private developers if it means bringing more affordable housing stock to NYC. [NYT]
  • The New York City Department of Transportation breaks ground on the second phase of Fordham Plaza’s reconstruction in the Bronx. Grimshaw is the architect behind the design. [Architect’s Newspaper]
  • Op-ed: Brooklyn Bridge Park can be maintained without building any of these 14 new high-rises on the park. The park is poised to come into as much as $200M when tax breaks expire starting 2018. [NYDN]
  • Developer Aby Rosen Instagramed an image of what the interiors of the Norman Foster-designed 610 Lexington Avenue will look like. [Curbed]

Images: B2 (left). Image by Field of Schemes; Manhattan aerial (right). Image Wiki Commons

Real Estate Wire

SHoP Architects b2 brooklyn, SHoP Architects, b2 brooklyn, world's tallest modular tower, new york's tallest modular tower

B2 (left); 635 West 42nd Street (right)

Featured Story

Battery Park City, Features, History, Major Developments, Midtown, Urban Design, Williamsburg

nyc master plan, master plan of manhattan, master planning new york

We often think of the street grid as New York’s greatest “master plan.” Officially known as the Commissioners’ Plan of 1811, this put in place the original, gridded street pattern that we still know today. But there have been several other master plans that took shape on a smaller scale within the linear configuration of Manhattan. These planned communities were largely conceived to transform blighted or underutilized areas into suburban enclaves or peaceful oases within the big city. And just like the neighborhoods that grew organically among the street grid, these master-planned areas each have a unique character. They’ve also influenced a new crop of developments, currently under construction on the West Side and in Brooklyn.

We take a look at planned communities that historically changed the fabric of the city, as well as those on the horizon

Featured Story

Features, Major Developments, New Developments, Staten Island

New York Wheel, Staten Island Ferris Wheel, St. George Redevelopment Project, Staten Island waterfront

You won’t find any Staten Island jokes or snarky references to secession here. No, we’re celebrating the borough that so easily gets forgotten amid the shiny new towers of Manhattan and trendy culture waves of Brooklyn. But just because it might not make daily headlines, doesn’t mean that Staten Island isn’t in the middle of some pretty amazing developments. From the Staten Island Ferris Wheel to the borough becoming the next great tech hub, we’ve rounded up the cultural, economic, and architectural projects that are going to make you want to board the Staten Island Ferry in pursuit of your new home.

Check out our list and get ready to start packing

Architecture, Landscape Architecture, New Developments, Prospect Heights, Rentals

Pacific Park Brooklyn, Greenland Forest City Partners, COOKFOX, Thomas Balsley

Forest City Ratner Companies and Greenland USA, a subsidiary of Shanghai-based Greenland Group, announced today that their new joint venture, Greenland Forest City Partners, has selected COOKFOX Architects to design two residential buildings at their Pacific Park Brooklyn project. They’ve also chosen Thomas Balsley Associates to design the site’s eight-acre public park, which will be called Pacific Park.

Formerly known as Atlantic Yards, Pacific Park Brooklyn will be a 22-acre site anchored by the Barclays Center and containing 8 million square feet of mixed-use development. The public park will be revealed in phases, with permanent and temporary installations. COOKFOX has begun the design for its two residential buildings– 550 Vanderbilt Avenue, set to feature 275 condominiums, and 535 Carlton Avenue, which will have approximately 300 affordable rentals. Construction is expected to begin on the latter this December, with 550 Vanderbilt not far behind. A third residential building will be designed by SHoP Architects, who were the minds behind the Barclays Center, at 30 Sixth Avenue with another 300 affordable rentals.

Much more on the project here

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