Russ & Daughters

Architecture, Brooklyn, Major Developments, New Developments

Brooklyn Navy Yard, Navy Yard redevelopment, Building 77, Russ & Daughters

After announcing two weeks ago that they’d be launching a free shuttle service to connect with 13 subway lines, the Brooklyn Navy Yard has now released additional details about the shuttle, as well as new renderings of Building 77’s $185 million renovation, reports Brownstoner. The 1,000,000-square-foot structure, a former ammunition depot, is the largest on the site, and when it reopens in 2017 it will offer luxury commercial space, a 16,000-square-foot rooftop, and its hotly anticipated food hall to be anchored by Lower East Side mainstay Russ & Daughters. The shuttle will have WiFi and will also connect to the LIRR. Additionally, the Navy Yard will get seven Citi Bike kiosks and 1,600 parking spaces.

More details and all the renderings

Daily Link Fix

NYC trees
  • Take a tour inside the Greenpoint home of Grace Bonney, founder of Design*Sponge. [BK Mag]
  • A then-and-now photo comparison shows how many trees have been planted in NYC in the last century. [NY Times]
  • Astor Place gets a Keith Haring sculpture. [EV Grieve]
  • The Sturgeon Queens, a documentary about Russ & Daughters, premieres tonight on Channel 13. Here’s a Q&A with director Julie Cohen. [Jeremiah’s Vanishing NY]
  • This Sunday you can volunteer with the Parks Department to plant dune grass in Rockaway. [Brokelyn]

Images: NYC trees via orchidgalore via photopin cc (L); Astor Place Keith Haring sculpture via EV Grieve (R)

Featured Story

Features, History, Lower East Side

pushcarts food in new-york 1938,pushcarts, pushcarts new york, pushcarts lower east side, orchard street historic

Image courtesy of MNCY

Long considered the capital of Jewish America, this overpoweringly cramped neighborhood was considered by many to be the greatest concentration of Jewish life in nearly 2,000 years.

Between 1880 and 1924, 2.5 million mostly-impoverished Ashkenazi Jews came to the US and nearly 75 percent took up residence on the Lower East Side. According to the Library of Congress, by 1900, more than 700 people per acre were settling in a neighborhood lined with tenements and factories. And as quickly as they descended on the streets, all sharing a common language (mostly Yiddish) and most certainly, similar backgrounds, they quickly established synagogues as early as 1865 (the landmarked Bialystoker Synagogue, whose congregants were mostly Polish immigrants from Bailystok), small shops, pushcarts teeming with goods, social clubs and even financial-aid societies.

By 1910, the Lower East Side’s population was well over the five million mark, but sadly, such congestion habitually caused havoc.

Learn more about the history of the LES here

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