Robert A.M. Stern

condos, New Developments, Starchitecture, Upper East Side

520 Park Avenue, Robert A.M. Stern, NYC supertalls

Developers of 520 Park Avenue have revealed apartment prices for all units in the building, which is poised to become one of the city’s most expensive condominium towers and include a $130 million penthouse. The building, which will rise in the high-priced corridor flanking Central Park that has been dubbed “Billionaire’s Row,” is expected to gross $1.2 billion in apartment sales, according to initial offering prices detailed in documents filed with the Attorney General’s office.

The $1.2 billion in total sales—which will make the building one of the most expensive in Manhattan history—is all the more impressive considering that current plans call for only 31 units, most of which will be full-floor residences.

Click here for full pricing information and floor plans

condos, New Developments, Starchitecture

220 central park south

It’s a good day for Robert A.M. Stern, whose buildings seem to be bringing billionaires to their knees. The Real Deal has just caught wind of the offering plan for Stern’s 220 Central Park South tower being developed by Vornado. According to the papers filed with the Attorney General and sources close to the development, the penthouse may ask $150 million to $175 million, bringing the building’s total sellout to a staggering $2.4 billion. The $175 million price tag would by far blow the Sony Building’s $150 million penthouse out of the water, and most certainly One57’s record $100 million sale which currently holds the title for the most expensive unit ever sold in the city.

Find out more here, plus floor plans!

Daily Link Fix

Project Underway, Rockaway Waterfront Alliance
  • Watch a video profile of starchitect Robert A.M. Stern, exploring his life, career, and noted accomplishments. [PBS]
  • The Rockaway Waterfront Alliance is proposing an ambitious park under the elevated A tracks called Project Underway. [Brownstoner Queens]
  • Video “Down Orchard Street” looks for the remaining bargain district vendors. [Bowery Boogie]
  • Hell’s Kitchen residents dig hot dogs, and Upper East Siders love French food. Yelp has put together a map of both the surprising and predictable popular cuisines of Manhattan neighborhoods. [DNAinfo]
  • New television series “My City’s Just Not That into Me” matches intrepid city dwellers with their ideal piece of real estate. [Curbed]

Images: Project Underway rendering via Rockaway Waterfront Alliance (L); Soul food via Wiki Commons (R)

condos, Interiors, New Developments, Starchitecture, Upper East Side

Robert A.M. Stern‘s 520 Park Avenue has already been called “the next 15 Central Park West,” and like its Stern predecessor, 520 is an ultra-luxury development with a stately façade wrapped in stone. Set to be completed in 2016, it will rise 51 stories high, but contain just 31 units, one of which is the $130 million penthouse, the city’s most expensive apartment. And though most of the attention has been on “the greatest apartment on the Upper East Side,” the fanfare has now shifted to the first batch of interior renderings for the building.

520 Park’s full website is now live, and not surprisingly, the residences have classic layouts, impressive Central Park views, and a host of high-end amenities.

Take the tour here

Starchitecture, Video

Robert A.M. Stern, 15 Central Park West, 15cpw, limestone jesus, interview Robert A.M. Stern, Robert A.M. Stern 15 central park west

15 Central Park West is frequently in the news—whether it’s because a new celeb has moved in, or that it’s recorded yet another blockbuster sale. But standing far from the limelight is the building’s architect, Robert A.M. Stern, who, like his buildings, opts for the stately, subdued and classic over the winding and twisting standalones of his contemporaries. “We have a lot of silly buildings being built, in my opinion. The buildings should not look like Lady Gaga,” the architect says. In the latest installment of the Louisiana Channel Stern discusses what might be his most famous project, 15 CPW, and why he strives for buildings that complement, not dominate.

Watch the interview here

Architecture, Design, Upper West Side 

d'aquino monaco 15 central park west

Tucked away within the austere limestone façade of Architect Robert A.M. Stern’s 15 Central Park West is this fabulous apartment courtesy of Carl D’Aquino and Francine Monaco of New York-based design firm D’Aquino Monaco. Every single room is a treat to the senses, with bold splashes of color and unusual finishing touches combined to create a living space as cozy as it is quirky.

Tour the colorful and whimsical home here

Featured Story

Architecture, Features, real estate trends, Starchitecture

Glass vs. Stone: An Epic Architecture Battle

By Dana Schulz, Thu, September 18, 2014

glas and stone nyc buildings, stone nyc buildings, glas nyc buildings

Decisions, decisions…sometimes there’s just far too many in New York City. Thai or Chinese takeout? Subway or bus? Central Park or the High Line? The list goes on. And one of the most grueling decisions we make as New Yorkers is where to live. From choosing a borough and neighborhood to deciding on a price point, it’s quite the undertaking. But what about the most elementary component of the building in which we decide to live–it’s material. To be more exact, glass or stone.

Glass tower dwellers are often drawn to the floor-to-ceiling windows, panoramic views, and clean lines, whereas buyers of apartments in stone buildings prefer a more traditional feel, with pre-war-style layouts that provide great separation of spaces. And some of the city’s most prominent architects have become synonymous with one style or the other. Think Richard Meier for glass and Robert A.M. Stern for stone. CityRealty decided to take a closer look at this epic battle and see how pairs of glass and stone developments fared across the city.

See how these buildings battle it out

SIGN UP FOR OUR NEWSLETTERS

Thank you, your sign-up request was successful!
This email address is already subscribed, thank you!
Please provide a valid email address.
Please complete the CAPTCHA.
Oops. Something went wrong. Please try again later.