RKTB Architects

affordable housing, Bronx, housing lotteries

12 East Clarke Place, Affordable Housing Lotteries, Bronx

Located just a few blocks from Yankee Stadium, this affordable housing project with a beautiful shared courtyard is truly unique, as it was developed on one of the last vacant city-owned lots. Applications are now being accepted for one- and two-bedroom rentals at 12 East Clarke Place and 27 East 169 Street in the Highbridge section of the Bronx, including $963/month one-bedrooms and $1,166/month two-bedrooms. 

Find out if you qualify

affordable housing, Architecture, Bronx, New Developments, Rentals

142nd Street and Saint Anne's, RTKL Architects, Affordable Housing, Bronx apartments

824 Saint Anne’s Avenue (L) and 345 Saint Anne’s Avenue (R); courtesy of RKTB Architects

Yesterday, the architecture world was abuzz with newly released renderings of Bjarke Ingels’ NYPD station house in the Bronx. Nearby, a couple of other buildings are set to rise, and though they may not have the same starchitect cachet, they’ll certainly attract some attention for the fact that together they’ll offer 269 units of affordable housing. Designed by RKTB, the architects behind our favorite castle conversion at 455 Central Park West, the buildings are planned for Saint Anne’s Avenue in the South Bronx, and their designs illustrate how far the city has come in raising the aesthetic quality of government-funded housing.

Find out all about the projects here

Featured Story

adaptive reuse, Architecture, Features, History, Upper West Side 

New York Cancer Hospital, 455 Central Park West, historic,

Walking down Central Park West from the north end of the park, it’s hard to miss the castle-like structure on the corner of 105th Street. The facade is dominated by great conical towers, majestic turrets, deep red brick, and a soft Belleville brownstone. A closer look reveals stained glass windows and intricate stonework, all convincing details that someone went out to build a fairy-tale castle on the perimeter of Central Park. Among the surrounding townhouses and co-op buildings, it’s a stunning piece of architecture that looks like it doesn’t quite belong. Indeed, the story of how this building, constructed at 455 Central Park West in 1887, still stands is an unlikely one that is rooted in medical history–a dark medical history, at that.

This was New York’s first cancer hospital, and the first hospital in the United States dedicated specifically to its treatment. This was a time when cancer treatment was unfamiliar to most doctors–in the back of the castle was a crematorium and smokestack that was often in use. After the hospital’s closure in 1955, it became a notorious nursing home known for mistreating its patients. When investigations caused the nursing home to close in 1974, the building was left to rot. Not until a redevelopment plan took off in 2000 was it restored into a luxury condo development. Today, despite its grim past, it remains an important piece of New York’s medical and architectural history.

Keep reading for the full story

Cool Listings, Interiors, West Village 

140 Charles Street PH21

Virtually every inch of this distinctively laid out 3,600-square-foot duplex at 140 Charles Street showcases some of New York’s most coveted views: the Empire State Building, Chrysler Building, Freedom Tower, Statue of Liberty, Brooklyn Bridge, and Hudson River unfold before you in all their majestic splendor.

It’s no wonder this home hasn’t been on the market since it was built as part of the The Memphis Downtown (designed by RKTB Architects) in 1985.

Perched on the 21st and 22nd floors of the West Village’s tallest condominium, this dramatic residence was professionally designed by award-winning architect Henry Myerberg, founder of HMA2, and those exterior views are yours forever thanks to the visionary work of the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation.

See the rooms, see the views

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