port authority

Financial District, Midtown, Policy

Though the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey would like you to think it’s been smooth sailing finding tenants for One World Trade Center, their spending habits say otherwise. As Crain’s reported, more than a year after Condé Nast made the big move from 4 Times Square to One World Trade, the agency is still dropping $3 million a month to pay for the old lease. This deal came about in 2011 when the Port Authority offered the incentive to entice the media company to relocate amid floundering activity at the downtown tower. In 2015 alone, they spent $47.6 million, and the payments are expected to continue into 2019 (when the lease ends) unless building owner the Durst Organization can find a new tenant.

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Major Developments, Starchitecture, Transportation

world trade center transportation hub, Santiago Calatrava, Port Authority

Santiago Calatrava: WTC Transportation Hub , New York (Photo: Mega Projects and Skyscrapers, via YouTube)

On Tuesday, news broke that the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey would not be holding a ribbon cutting ceremony when the World Trade Center Transportation Hub opens next week. They called Santiago Calatrava’s project “a symbol of excess.” Perhaps feeling the backlash from their decision, the agency sent out a press release yesterday saying that though there will still be no event to mark the opening on March 3rd at 3pm, they will hold a ceremony once the Hub is fully up and running this spring, according to the Wall Street Journal. They credit their change of heart to a desire to thank the thousands of workers who built the station. Additionally, Port Authority Chairman John Degnan said, “It will stand, along with the memorial, museum and the buildings themselves, as a tribute the resiliency of the region.”

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Major Developments, Polls, Starchitecture, Transportation

world trade center transportation hub, Santiago Calatrava, Port Authority

Yesterday the Port Authority announced that they won’t be holding a ribbon cutting ceremony (or any type of celebratory event, for that matter) to mark the opening of Santiago Calatrava’s World Trade Center Transportation Hub next month. They called the Hub “a symbol of excess” and cited the exorbitant $4 billion price tag as the reason for foregoing it. But at the end of the day, the agency is in charge of overseeing the new development. And despite the delays and budget overruns, is it right to ignore a place that is, to many, a symbol of rebirth for lower Manhattan?

Images: Ironworkers attach the “Old Glory” flag to the final Oculus rafter piece before installation, via Facebook/WTC Progress (L); via Mega Projects and Skyscrapers, via YouTube (R)

Major Developments, Starchitecture, Transportation

world trade center transportation hub, Santiago Calatrava, Port Authority

Santiago Calatrava: WTC Transportation Hub , New York (Photo: Mega Projects and Skyscrapers, via YouTube)

When the subject of Santiago Calatrava’s World Trade Center Transportation Hub comes up, what’s most likely to come to mind is not the flying-bird-looking architecture, but the fact that it was so incredibly delayed (it’s six years off schedule) and over-budget (final construction costs ring in around $4 billion in taxpayer dollars, twice what was projected, making it the world’s most expensive train station). The latter is not sitting well with the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, who oversee the hub, as they’ve announced that they will not host an event to mark the opening during the first week of March, calling it “a symbol of excess,” according to Politico. Similarly, Governors Christie and Cuomo, who control the agency, have declined to commemorate the opening.

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Transportation

If you’re someone who takes advantage of curbside pick up/drop off at NYC’s airports as a way to avoid parking fees, that prudent sidestep could soon be coming to an end. CBS reports that the Port Authority is considering access fees as a way to reduce congestion outside airport terminals. Traffic is said to have become a real problem as services like Lyft and Uber have begun using the front of the terminals as prime spots to pick up business.

“The operations of For-Hire-Vehicles and taxis at our airports are evolving rapidly and we are in the early stages of review,” the Port Authority noted in a statement. They also added that NYC’s airports are one of the very few in the U.S. that do not charge curbside access fees, and where tolls are implemented, car services usually just pass the buck onto riders—meaning services and taxi drivers shouldn’t worry about lost fare, but you will be shelling out even more cash to make up the difference when you get in their cars.

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Archtober2020