Perkins Eastman Architects

affordable housing, Harlem, New Developments, Rentals

321 East 96th Street, Perkins Eastman Architects, AvalonBay Communities, East Harlem development

Looking to take advantage of the newly opened Second Avenue Subway stop at 96th Street, the New York City Educational Construction Fund and AvalonBay Communities are working their way through the city approval process to build a 1.14 million-square foot, full-block, mixed-use development in East Harlem. CityRealty tells us that the project located at 321 East 96th Street would hold two new school buildings for three different local schools, 20,000 square feet of retail space, a rebuilt playground, and a 68-story, 760-foot residential tower that would offer between 1,100 and 1,200 units and possibly become the city’s tallest building to contain affordable housing (roughly 330 below-market rate units).

More details and renderings

Architecture, Chinatown, Lower East Side, New Developments

259 Clinton Street, Perkins Eastman, Two Bridges, Starrett Group

The historically low-income, low-slung neighborhood of Two Bridges–the area along the East River, near the footings of the Manhattan and Brooklyn Bridges where the Lower East Side meets Chinatown–has become a high-rise hotbed over the past year. Despite the controversy that the four planned projects, all upwards of 700 feet, have caused, they’re moving along fairly swiftly, and The Lo-Down now has the big reveal for the final site–Starrett Group‘s 259 Clinton Street. Perkins Eastman Architects have designed the 724-foot, 62-story glass tower, which will have ground-floor retail and 732 apartments, 25 percent of which will be permanently affordable with a good chunk being set aside for low-income seniors.

More details and renderings ahead

From Our Partners, Union Square

Renderings by SAN for Ennead Architects and Perkins Eastman

Mount Sinai Health System announced on Tuesday that phase one of a $500 million project to rebuild Mount Sinai Beth Israel and create the new “Mount Sinai Downtown” network is set to start. The network will expand and renovate three sites of outpatient facilities, according to the hospital, which will stretch from the East River to the Hudson River below 34th Street. The network will include 35 operating and procedure rooms and 16 physician practice locations with more than 600 doctors.

renderings this way

Featured Story

Architecture, Features, Midtown West, Transportation, Urban Design

On Tuesday, an agreement was reached between West Side elected officials and the Port Authority that said the agency would expand the planning process for a new $10 billion bus terminal with more local input. And just today they’ve revealed the five proposals that were submitted to a design competition to replace the currently loathed site. Crain’s brings us videos of the ideas, which come from big-name firms Pelli Clarke Pelli Architects, Arcadis, AECOM in partnership with Skidmore Owings & Merrill, Perkins Eastman, and Archilier Architecture Consortium. Though this seems counter to the agreement, John Degnan, the Port Authority’s New Jersey-appointed chairman, said he doubts “any one of them will be the final design,” since they either further complicate existing planning issues or cost billions over budget.

Take a look at them all here

Architecture, Construction Update, New Developments, Upper East Side

Perkins Eastman, CUNY, MSK, Memorial Sloan Kettering, East River, Hunter College

On a far-eastern block of the Upper East Side’s Lenox Hill neighborhood, a unique venture is underway to build new facilities for Hunter College and Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. Now wrapping up its cavernous foundations, the 1.15 million-square-foot development will accommodate two separate towers: an East River-facing building that will house a 730,000-square-foot, 23-story outpatient treatment center for Memorial Sloan-Kettering; and a slightly smaller, 400,000-square-foot mid-block building for CUNY-Hunter College’s schools of nursing and physical therapy. Hunter will trade its current nursing school facility at First Avenue and East 25th Street to the city where they will build a new sanitation facility.

In 2012, then-mayor Michael Bloomberg awarded the institutions the right to to build upon the half-block parcel fronting the FDR Drive between East 73rd and 74th Streets. The site was previously home to a sanitation facility that was demolished in 2008 and was sold to the college-hospital for $226 million. The mammoth, 455-foot-tall structure is being designed by Perkins Eastman in collaboration with Ennead Architects and required special approvals to rise more than the as-of-right floor area and height limit. Aside from the project’s size, neighbors took issue with the project’s shortfall of parking spaces and the resulting congestion of a community loaded with medical facilities.

Find out more this way

Architecture, Midtown East, New Developments, Turtle Bay

Turkevi Center, Turkish Consulate, Perkins Eastman, 821 First Avenue

Though Perkins Eastman‘s design of Turkey’s forthcoming 32-story consulate tower was inspired by a Turkish crescent (a large, ornate, gilded instrument), the firm took a very streamlined approach to their vision, using swooping curves and geometric patterns to “evoke Islamic themes and Turkish art and culture,” as 6sqft previously described.

The Turkevi Center will rise along Consulate Row, at 821 United Nations Plaza, the corner of 46th Street and First Avenue. According to a press release first spotted by Curbed, it will “feature prominent loggias along the upper floors of the south and east faces, and be stacked atop a podium wrapped in perforated metal paneling.” The project had been on the drawing board for more than three years, but Perkins Eastman have now received the green light to move ahead with the building that will house new consulate offices, passport and visa branch offices, conference rooms, a multi-purpose prayer room, fitness center, auditorium, underground parking, and residential space for staff and visitors.

Additional details and renderings ahead

Architecture, Brooklyn, condos, New Developments, Rentals, Sheepshead Bay

15001 Voorhies Avenue, Sheepshead Bay, Muss Development and AvalonBay, Min W. Suh, Perkins Eastman (3)

In Manhattan, much of Brooklyn, and parts of Queens like Long Island City, a 300-foot tower isn’t even news. But out in the once-sleepy waterfront community of Sheepshead Bay, it’s sure to get people talking.

Last September, it was revealed that a joint venture between Muss Development and AvalonBay would be building a 30-story residential tower at 1501 Voorhies Avenue that would be four times taller than almost anything else in the area. Now, here’s our first look at the large and rather glassy behemoth designed by Perkins Eastman Architects. According to revised building plans, the tower is two stories shorter than initially filed and has a height of 331 feet, 6 inches to the top of its rooftop mechanical bulkhead.

More details and renderings

Architecture, condos, Hudson Square, New Developments

111 Varick Street, S9, Madigan Development, AB Architekten, SOHo

At the edge of the Holland Tunnel’s Jersey-bound vortex, Madigan Development is planning to build a 15-story, 49-unit residential building at 111 Varick Street. Anchoring the southwest corner of Broome and Varick Streets in West Soho (aka Hudson Square), the tower is replacing a multi-story parking garage and will sit adjacent to another planned 19-story residential tower at 568 Broome Street.

Renderings of 111 Varick show a blocky building clad in a drunken checkerboard pattern of glass and stone. While it has yet to be confirmed if the building will be a condo or rental, large layouts and its prime location between Soho and Tribeca allude to condos.

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Polls, Urban Design

POLL: Should Broadway Become a Giant Park?

By Dana Schulz, Wed, December 16, 2015

Earlier this week, 6sqft brought you a proposal by Perkins Eastman Architects to turn a 40-block-long stretch of Broadway into a linear park. Stretching from Columbus Circle to Union Square, the Green Line concept would connect these hubs with Times Square, Herald Square, and Madison Square. As we noted, “Unlike other linear parks like the High Line and Lowline, the Green Line would be at street level, creating what the architects feel is ‘much needed active and passive recreational space in the heart of the city.'” Of course, increasing public park space is never a bad thing, but is this the correct location? And will closing such a long piece of Broadway to vehicular traffic just create more problems elsewhere? Let us know what you think.

Renderings via Perkins Eastman Architects

Green Design, Urban Design

What if Broadway Was Turned Into a Giant Linear Park?

By Dana Schulz, Mon, December 14, 2015

Green Line, Perkins Eastman, NYC parks, linear parks, Broadway NYC

New York has undertaken several projects over the years in an effort to beautify its stark, gridded streets. There was the Park Avenue Malls, turning major intersections like those at Madison Square and Times Square into seating and entertainment areas, bike lanes, and Summer Streets. But this new proposal from Perkins Eastman Architects certainly puts the rest to shame, as they’d like to turn a more-than-40-block stretch of Broadway into one big linear park.

First spotted by Dezeen, the Green Line concept envisions a park that stretches along Broadway from Columbus Circle to Union Square, connecting these two hubs with Madison Square, Herald Square, and Times Square. The park would be open only to pedestrians and bicyclists, save for emergency vehicles needing to bypass traffic. Unlike other linear parks like the High Line and Lowline, the Green Line would be at street level, creating what the architects feel is “much needed active and passive recreational space in the heart of the city.”

More details and renderings ahead

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