Park Slope

Brooklyn, Cool Listings, Interiors, Park Slope

420 12th Street, Park Slope

There are lofts, and then there are lofts like this three-bedroom, two-and-a-half-bath duplex in an 1880s factory building at 420 12th Street. Once home to the Ansonia Clock Company, the building was converted into a co-op by Hurley & Farinella Architects, nearly a century after being constructed. With intentions of keeping the building’s provenance intact, the architects worked diligently to maintain original details like exposed brick, factory beams and wood ceilings, and combined them with modern updates that mesh seamlessly with the building’s historic bones.

See more of this timeless beauty

Brooklyn, Cool Listings, Interiors, Park Slope

99 Berkeley Place

Homes like this adorably perfect apartment don’t come on the market all that often in this neck of the woods — because who would ever want to leave? Even if Park Slope hadn’t been “New York” magazine’s choice for the ‘Most Livable Neighborhood’ in the city in 2010, one would have to look no further than its charming, small-town feel and notable residents (Maggie Gyllenhaal, Kerry Russell and Steve Buscemi, to name a few) to know they hit the neighborhood jackpot. Plus, this gem of a home located at 99 Berkeley Place has a fun bonus all its own. We’ll get to that a little later on.

This way for a great apartment in a great neighborhood

Brooklyn, Cool Listings, Interiors, Park Slope

261 Garfield Place Unit 3

Newer isn’t necessarily better. Over 100 years ago architect Henry Pohlman built the elegant “apartment house” at 261 Garfield Place where you will find this refined yet cozy co-op on the market for $2.1 million. And while we doubt Mr. Pohlman could ever have imagined even the entire building selling for that price, much less a single apartment, it is clear he took great pride in his work.

Throughout the 3BR/2BA residence period details abound, with high ceilings, parquet flooring, ceiling medallions, and decorative moulding at every turn. And a wide gallery/hallway leads you from one end of the home to the other.

See more of this classic home in a classic neighborhood

Daily Link Fix

MoMA PS1, self-assembling material, mushroom material, David Benjamin

Images: Mushroom Tower rendering (left), Brooklyn workspace (right)

Brooklyn, Interiors, Park Slope, Recent Sales

272 Berekley Place dining room

When Evelyn and Everett Ortner bought their Park Slope brownstone at 272 Berkeley Place in 1963 for $32,000 they probably never imaged it would sell 50 years later for over $3 million.  But it was their own historically sensitive and forward-looking vision that helped revitalize the area and make it a much-sought-after Brooklyn neighborhood.

The Ortners moved to Park Slope when brownstones were unfashionable and the rich turned their noses down at the area.  They convinced their friends to also buy brownstones in the neighborhood. Evelyn was an interior designer specializing in period interiors, and the couple meticulously restored their home down to every last historic detail.  After a 25th anniversary trip to France, where they were inspired by local preservationists working to conserve a crumbling castle in Normandy, Mr. and Mrs. Ortner dedicated themselves to historic preservation efforts in Park Slope until their deaths in 2006 and 2012.

See the results of the couple’s tireless passion

Park Slope, Recent Sales

354 10th Street, Brooklyn

The polished, Italianate rowhouse at 354 10th Street in Park Slope sold for $2.3 million, according to city records filed yesterday evening. The listing was held by Corcoran Group.

Built in 1899, the two-family home has a modest façade with carved window lintels and an intact cornice. One in a row of three similar houses, it’s basement level is brownstone and the upper two stories are brick.

Inside, the refined details continue with decorative picture moldings and original tin ceilings.

rowhouse eye candy this way

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