outdoor dining

Events, Financial District

Photo courtesy of @meetresident

When outdoor dining launched this past summer, New Yorkers had a number of unique spots to dine al fresco, from the most photographed block in Brooklyn to one of the city’s oldest streets. A special outdoor dining experience has launched in New York, created by Resident, a startup that hosts dinners on balconies and rooftops of luxury apartments. Next month, the company is hosting a socially-distant supper club at the Broad Exchange Building, a landmarked skyscraper in the Financial District.

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Policy, Restaurants

Photo by Eden, Janine and Jim on Flickr

The New York City Council on Thursday voted to make outdoor dining permanent and year-round and lifted the ban on portable propane heaters. The legislation approved by the Council extends the city’s current Open Restaurants program, in which more than 10,500 restaurants have enrolled since June, until September 30, 2021, and requires it to be replaced with a permanent program. Under the program, restaurants will also be able to use portable propane heaters, which were previously banned.

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Policy, Restaurants

NYC outdoor dining will be year-round and permanent

By Devin Gannon, Fri, September 25, 2020

St. Marks Place outdoor dining; Photo by Eden, Janine and Jim on Flickr

Outdoor dining will be a permanent, year-round feature for New York City restaurants, Mayor Bill de Blasio announced on Friday. The city’s popular “Open Restaurants” program, which launched in June and allows restaurants to set up outdoor seating on sidewalks, patios, and on some streets closed to cars on weekends, was set to expire on October 31. During his weekly appearance on WNYC’s The Brian Lehrer Show, de Blasio said the program will be “part of the life of the city for years to come.” The “Open Streets: Restaurants” program, which has closed roughly 87 streets to traffic for car-free dining on weekends, will also be made permanent, the mayor said.

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Restaurants

Photo by Eden, Janine and Jim via Flickr cc

Just days after he expanded the city’s popular Open Streets program to 87 streets and nine pedestrian plazas, Mayor de Blasio announced that 40 of these locations will now be open on weekdays to accommodate outdoor dining. Previously, the car-free streets were only allowed to operate on Friday evenings, Saturdays, and Sundays. “Restaurants deserve every chance they can get to serve more customers this fall – and, as the weather gets cooler, New Yorkers deserve every chance they can get to enjoy outdoor dining,” said Mayor de Blasio.

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Policy, Restaurants

Photo by 6sqft

Restaurants in New York City can charge diners a fee of up to 10 percent of the total bill for in-person dining under new legislation passed by the City Council on Wednesday. The “COVID-19 Recovery Charge” aims to offset losses businesses have suffered since the start of the health crisis in March. The surcharge will be permitted until 90 days after full indoor dining resumes. Gov. Andrew Cuomo this month said indoor dining can reopen on September 30 at 25 percent capacity.

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New Jersey, Policy, Restaurants

Expanded outdoor dining on 14th Street through Hoboken’s Summer Streets, courtesy of Mayor Bhalla’s office

Hoboken Mayor Ravi S. Bhalla seems to always be one step ahead of his counterpart in NYC when it comes to social COVID preparations. And this time, he’s planning to extend outdoor dining straight through to 2021. Yesterday, Mayor Bhalla and the Hoboken City Council released guidelines on safe, outdoor heating options, application information for businesses to continue participating, and procedures on snow removal.

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Restaurants

Rockwell Group’s DineOut NYC in Manhattan’s Chinatown; Photo courtesy of Emily Andrews for Rockwell Group

Even as the city prepares to resume indoor dining this month, more restaurants will be able to take advantage of the program that allows expanded street and sidewalk seating. Mayor Bill de Blasio announced last week seven new locations for outdoor dining on open streets across the five boroughs, bringing the total to 87 streets and nine pedestrian plazas designated for restaurant use on weekends. The latest batch of outdoor dining streets will be overseen by a number of neighborhood restaurants, including Gertie’s in Williamsburg, Kheo-Yo in Tribeca, Ray’s Bar on the Lower East Side, and others.

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Policy, Restaurants

New York City will open indoor dining on September 30

By Devin Gannon, Wed, September 9, 2020

Photo by Marcus Herzberg from Pexels

Restaurants in New York City will be able to resume indoor dining on September 30, Gov. Andrew Cuomo announced on Wednesday. Capacity will be limited to 25 percent with strict coronavirus-related regulations in place. In addition to the task force led by the State Liquor Authority, the city will provide 400 inspectors to oversee compliance at restaurants. Cuomo said the state will also rely on city residents to report any violations. “I believe in New Yorkers to do the right thing,” the governor said during a press briefing.

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Policy, Restaurants

St. Marks Place outdoor dining; Photo by Eden, Janine and Jim on Flickr

Indoor dining could resume in New York City only if police are able to enforce compliance of coronavirus regulations at restaurants, Gov. Andrew Cuomo said Thursday. During a call with reporters, the governor said he could allow restaurants to open for indoor dining if the city creates a task force of NYPD officers designated to oversee compliance. Cuomo said he plans to discuss the issue with City Council Speaker Corey Johnson, who on Wednesday called for an immediate start of indoor dining, which has been allowed in every region in the state except the five boroughs.

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Policy, Restaurants

Credit: Ed Reed/Mayoral Photography Office

Outdoor dining has offered a much-needed lifeline to many New York City restaurants struggling because of the coronavirus pandemic. But creating a space on city streets and sidewalks that is both inviting to diners and meets the city’s safety standards comes at a cost. To help restaurants reopen, the city’s Economic Development Corporation partnered with NYCxDesign, the American Institute of Architects, and the Center for Architecture to launch an online network that connects restaurants with architects and designers willing to provide design help for free.

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Archtober2020