Original Penn Station

Featured Story

Features, History, Midtown West, photography, The urban lens

Photography, Penn Station, Art, Zach Gross

6sqft’s series The Urban Lens invites photographers to share work exploring a theme or a place within New York City. In this installment, photographer Zach Gross presents his series “Penn Station.” Are you a photographer who’d like to see your work featured on The Urban Lens? Get in touch with us at [email protected].

The original Penn Station, a Beaux-Arts masterpiece completed by McKim, Mead & White in 1910, evoked the kind of grandeur one would expect upon arriving in one of the greatest cities in the world, complete with a grand facade made of massive Corinthian columns and a 15-story waiting room with a steel and glass roof. This structure was demolished in 1964 and replaced with our present version, lacking any of the architectural merit or civic design of its predecessor. But recent years have sparked a renewed interest in transforming the station into an updated and better functional transit hub, falling under a $1.6 billion plan from Governor Cuomo.

Well aware of both the history and future of Penn Station, photographer Zach Gross recently completed a unique series that layers historic imagery of the site with contemporary photos. He feels that, though the station is currently dysfunctional, “there’s still hope for a grand, more unified and uplifting structure,” and it’s this hopeful sentiment that shines through in his work.

Hear more from Zach and see his photo series

Daily Link Fix

Doorway Galleries, Adel Souto, NYC street art, NYC street photography
  • Photo series “Doorway Galleries” documents the spray-painted, stenciled, and stickered doorways of NYC buildings. [BK Mag]
  • Active uses, street furniture, and first-floor windows–are these the three traits shared by the city’s most walkable streets? [CityLab]
  • A mysterious building on West 31st Street is the last remnant of the original Penn Station. [Scouting NY]
  • This device for cell phone addicts locks your phone away during the most valuable times of day. [Yanko Design]
  • Have a look at “Trump Force One,” Donald Trump‘s private jet. [Business Insider]

Images: Doorway Galleries by Adel Souto (L); Original Penn Station (R)

Featured Story

Architecture, Features, History

Original Penn Station, lost NYC landmarks, McKim Mead & White, Penn Station waiting room

At Monday’s MCNY symposium “Redefining Preservation for the 21st Century,” starchitect Robert A.M. Stern lamented about 2 Columbus Circle and its renovation that rendered it completely unrecognizable. What Stern saw as a modernist architectural wonder, notable for its esthetics, cultural importance (it was built to challenge MoMA and the prevailing architectural style at the time), and history (the building originally served as a museum for the art collection of Huntington Hartford), others saw as a hulking grey slab. Despite the efforts of Stern and others to have the building landmarked, it was ultimately altered completely.

This story is not unique; there are plenty of worthy historic buildings in New York City that have been heavily changed, let to fall into disrepair, or altogether demolished. And in many of these cases, the general public realized their significance only after they were destroyed. In honor of the 50th anniversary of the NYC landmarks law, we’ve rounded up some of the most cringe-worthy crimes committed against architecture.

Check out our list right here

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