NYC Pride

Events, Policy

corey johnson, pride, lgbtq

Speaker Corey Johnson and the New York City Council March in the 2019 Pride Parade. Photo by John McCarten via Flickr, courtesy of New York City Council.

In honor of a World Pride weekend that commemorated the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall Inn uprising, City Council Speaker Corey Johnson has announced $19 million in funding for LGBT support programs, which nearly doubles the funding in support of the city’s gay community, the Daily News reports. The budget includes $2.3 million for Trans Equity Programs, $3.7 million for LGBT community services and $800,000 for LGBT inclusive curriculum in public schools. Johnson said, “Acceptance is not enough. Our local government must fund programs that support the LBGTQ community, particularly transgender people.”

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Featured Story

Features, Greenwich Village, History

The long road to landmark: How NYC’s Stonewall Inn became a symbol of civil rights

By Andrew Berman of Village Preservation, Fri, June 28, 2019

Via NPCA on Flickr

Millions will converge in New York City this weekend to celebrate events which took place in and outside of a Greenwich Village bar 50 years ago. The Stonewall Riots will not only be memorialized here in New York City, but those events have come to take on international significance. There are celebrations and marches in countries across the globe, with the name ‘Stonewall’ also used by countless organizations and entities around the world to signify the quest for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) equality.

But 50 years ago those three nights of protests were barely noticed beyond the boundaries of the local neighborhood and a small but energized group of activists and rabble-rousers. They garnered little media attention, and most of the attention received was pretty negative – including from the gay community. So how did the events at the Stonewall 50 years ago go from an obscure set of disturbances at the tail end of the decade marked by strife and disorder, to an internationally-recognized symbol of a civil rights movement? Ahead, learn about Stonewall’s long road to becoming a civil rights landmark.

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Events, weekend subway service

Pride NYC, NYC subway, Pride MTA

Image: Marc A. Hermann / MTA New York City Transit

The crowds at this weekend’s WorldPride events are expected to break records, with an estimated 4.5 million people attending Sunday’s Pride March, including 115,000 marchers. The MTA is showing its Pride this weekend by making it easier for you to join the festivities. We can finally share some good weekend service news: the authority is suspending all L train tunnel rehabilitation work this weekend and will increase service on other lines to accommodate all revelers. If you want to secure a spot on the Parade route, make sure you get there early as they’re sure to fill up fast.

Here’s what you need to know

Events

Image via Flickr

Celebrating the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall Uprising and culminating the monthlong WorldPride festivities, this year’s NYC Pride March taking place on Sunday, June 30 is set to be the largest Pride parade since the tradition launched in 1970. Approximately two million people attend the event each year, making it the biggest Pride celebration in the world, and that number should easily be surpassed this year.

Routes, street closures, and more

Events

madison square garden, pride, lgbt

Photo of Madison Square Garden via NYC and Company

This month, 19 buildings throughout the five boroughs will be lighting up rainbow in honor of WorldPride and the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall Riots. The city-wide display is part of NYC and Company’s Project Rainbow, a marketing initiative led by the city’s official tourism organization. Among the sites listed are the Empire State Building, Madison Square Garden, and the World Trade Center.

Find out where to be on the lookout for Pride-themed lights…

Featured Story

Events, Features, History

“GAA and Vito Russo marching in 1st Christopher St Liberation Day Parade,” The New York Public Library Digital Collections. 1970.

Decades ago, New York City’s Pride Parade was controversial because it focused on LGBTQ rights. And while there’s always more work to be done, five decades later, the LGBTQ community has gained legal recognition and acceptance. And in sharp contrast to the first Pride March, the annual event now seems to attract as many politicians and corporate sponsors as it does activists. But one controversy persists—the Pride Parade route itself.

Route this way

Featured Story

Art, Events, Features

Last year’s Pride Parade, via Wiki Commons

Fifty years have passed since the Stonewall Uprising changed New York City forever and gave the world a symbol of the struggle for LGBTQ rights and recognition. There are a seemingly endless number of ways to celebrate this milestone, learn about the history of the gay rights movement and enjoy a rainbow of diversity. Heritage of Pride, the nonprofit organization behind New York City’s official LGBTQIA+ WorldPride events, offers an interactive map to help navigate the many events planned this month. Below, you’ll find 50 ways to celebrate Pride Month.

Pride, parades and parties, this way

Art, Events

Buff Monster’s Lower East Side mural; Photo courtesy of NYC Pride

To celebrate WorldPride and the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall uprising next month, 50 murals will be painted on walls across New York City. As amNY first reported, the new street art is an initiative from NYC Pride for the World Mural Project. According to the organization, the murals will “reflect and honor the beauty, struggle, and strides of the LGBTQIA+ community.” The first mural designed by local artist Buff Monster was completed last week and can be viewed on the corner of Chrystie and Broome Street on the Lower East Side.

Get the details

Art, Greenwich Village, Landscape Architecture

Photo by Tia Richards for 6sqft

New York’s first public monument to the LGBTQ community opened Sunday in the Greenwich Village, a historically significant neighborhood for the gay rights movement. Located in Hudson River Park and designed by local artist Anthony Goicolea, the monument honors the victims of the 2016 Pulse nightclub shooting, as well as all victims of hate and violence.

“This memorial saddens us, when we think about the Orlando 49 senseless deaths, but it also enlightens us, and it also inspires us,” Cuomo said on Sunday. “It inspires New Yorkers to do what New Yorkers have always done – what Anthony was referring to: to push forward, to keep going forward on that journey until we reach the destination that the Statue of Liberty promised in the first place.”

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Art, Greenwich Village, Landscape Architecture

LGBT, Pride NYC, nyc monuments

Rendering by Anthony Goicolea via Gov. Cuomo’s office

A monument to the LGBTQ community is taking shape in Hudson River Park along the Greenwich Village waterfront. Last year, Gov. Andrew Cuomo chose Brooklyn-based artist Anthony Goicolea to design the monument, aimed at honoring both the LGBT rights movement and the victims of the 2016 Orlando Pulse nightclub shooting. Although the Hudson River Park Trust told 6sqft an opening date of the installation isn’t known yet, Urban Omnibus reported the monument is expected to be completed this month, coinciding with Pride Month.

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