New York Marble Cemetery

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Architecture, Art, Art nerd ny, Design, Events, Features

Art Nerd New York founder Lori Zimmer shares her top art, design and architecture event picks for 6sqft readers!

If you’re staying in town for the Fourth weekend, be sure to flex your cultural muscle! Check out a mix of fine art and architecture twice this week- first catch a slice of the Vatican at Santiago Calatrava’s Oculus, then head to the Park Armory for a project by Ai Weiwei and Herzog & deMeuron. Spend some time in City Hall Park with Katja Novitskova’s new series of sculptures, then relax in the rarely-opened New York Marble Cemetery for a group show by Ugo Rondinone. Party it up on the cobblestone streets of Wooster for their annual block party, then grab a blanket and catch Brigitte Bardot on the big screen under the stars. Finally, experience Paris’ Urban Arts Fair at Spring Street Studios- and check out a book signing with me on Friday!
Details on these events and more this way

East Village

New York Marble Cemetery, East Village history, historic NYC cemeteries

Photo via gsz via photopin cc

Does this time of year get you thinking about where you’d like to spend the afterlife? Would a swanky Manhattan address be to your liking? If so, you’d better act fast. There are only two burial plots left on the island and they’re currently on the market for $350,000 each.

Daily Intelligencer reports that the New York Marble Cemetery (not to be confused with the New York City Marble Cemetery–more on that here) in the East Village has two available family vaults that can hold about a dozen descendants (“each generation gains some space as the previous ones turn to dust”). The Trinity Cemetery & Mausoleum on West 153rd Street has a few inground burial plots vacant, but they’re reserved for “VIPs;” those at the Marble Cemetery are the only ones being freely sold.

More on what could be your forever home

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Features, holidays, real estate trends

Calvary Cemetery Queens

Photo via Plowboylifestyle/CC

Not so surprisingly, Manhattan has a slew of cemeteries, graveyards and built-over potter’s fields (for unclaimed bodies). Madison Square Park was originally used as a potter’s field, as was Bryant Park. And though these swaths of land served many purposes over the years, it took an eternity before they were lovely public parks. From the late 1600s, burial grounds were generally confined to what would now be just south of City Hall, but more began popping up further uptown during the 1800s as the city’s population grew in leaps and bounds.

With Halloween upon us, tis’ the season for checking out if living near one might give a buyer a bit of a ghostly scare or whether it takes an eternity to sell when the living room window overlooks tombstones marking coffins buried six feet under.

Hear what experts say, and then learn about the city’s most notable graveyards.

Do homes near cemeteries sell at a discount in NYC?

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East Village, Features, History

Peeking into the East Village’s Marble Cemeteries

By Dana Schulz, Fri, October 17, 2014

New York City Marble Cemetery, East Village history, historic NYC cemeteries

Today we think of cemeteries as spooky, haunted places that we avoid, or as sad, depressing spots reserved for funerals. But they were once quite the opposite–in fact, they were the earliest incarnations of public parks. In New York City, burials took place on private or church property up until the mid-1800’s when commercial cemeteries began popping up. And in the East Village there are two such early burial grounds hidden among the townhouses and tenements–the New York Marble Cemetery (on the west side of Second Avenue just above Second Street) and the New York City Marble Cemetery (on the north side of Second Street between First and Second Avenues).

Though their titles are extremely similar and they’re located less than a block apart, the two cemeteries are operated separately and have their own unique history. And during openhousenewyork weekend, we were lucky enough to take a peek beyond the cast iron gates and into these important pieces of the East Village’s past.

Explore the Marble Cemeteries

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