new jersey

New Jersey, Policy, Restaurants

Photo of Asbury Festhalle & Biergarten by cogito ergo imago on Flickr

Restaurants and bars in New Jersey will no longer be able to resume indoor service on Thursday as planned, Gov. Phil Murphy announced. The governor on Monday said the pause of this part of the state’s reopening plan comes as coronavirus cases spike across the country and more photos and videos of maskless crowds at establishments have surfaced. “It brings me no joy to do this, but we have no choice,” Murphy said during a press briefing.

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New Jersey, Policy

Photo of Asbury Park, NJ via Wikimedia Commons

Beaches and boardwalks of the Jersey Shore will open in time for Memorial Day, Gov. Phil Murphy announced on Thursday. Effective May 22, all public and private beaches and lakeside areas can open in the state, but with capacity limits and social distancing measures in place.

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Features, New Jersey, Policy

All of the beach, boardwalk, and park closures in NJ

By Devin Gannon, Wed, April 8, 2020

Bradley Beach, NJ; Photo by Ryan Loughlin on Unsplash

As the number of coronavirus cases in New Jersey continues to climb, state and city officials are furthering social distancing measures by closing public spaces across the state. Gov. Phil Murphy on Tuesday signed an executive order shuttering all state parks and forests, as well as county parks. A number of Jersey Shore towns have closed beaches and boardwalks, with some even banning short-term rentals to curb visits from out-of-towners. “My focus and our focus, our sole mission right now is the health of every New Jersey family,” Murphy said. “And we must not just flatten this curve, we must crush this curve.” Ahead, find out which public spaces in NJ have been temporarily closed as a result of the pandemic.

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New Jersey, Policy, real estate trends

Asbury Park, NJ; via Wikimedia

A surcharge on short-term rentals took effect last October in New Jersey, making it one of the first big states to implement such a tax. An 11.6 percent tax, dubbed the “Airbnb tax,” applies to properties rented for fewer than 90 days made on home-sharing sites or directly between a renter and homeowner, excluding deals arranged through a broker. But as homeowners gear up for the summer season in the coming months, owners of Jersey Shore rental homes say the tax has made it harder to fully book their properties ahead of beach season, the New York Times reported.

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Features, Transportation

NYC transit ideas

Commuting in and around NYC can at times be a daunting task, and with the all of the pending subway closures, things are about to get a bit more complicated. However, all hope is not lost, and a trouble-free ride to work right be in the near future. From a city-wide ferry system to cell-phone friendly subway cars, both Governor Cuomo and Mayor de Blasio have several new initiatives in play to improve the city’s infrastructure. In addition to these ambitious government-backed measures, there are also a slew of motivated residents looking to make some changes, including a 32-Mile Greenway in Brooklyn and Queens and a High Line-esque bridge spanning the Hudson River, just to name a few. To keep your spirits high when subway lines are down, we’ve put together this list of top 10 transportation proposals for NYC.

See all 10 here

Celebrities, Cool Listings, New Jersey

7 1/2 West End Court in Long Branch, born to run house,

This quaint cottage may not look like the refuge of a rock n’ roll great, but this little house is indeed special for one particular reason: Bruce Springsteen wrote “Born to Run” while living here. According to the Daily News, the 828-square-foot abode at 7 1/2 West End Court in Long Branch, NJ, is back on the market for just under $300K. Springsteen, who took up the space at a wee 25 years old, celebrated the 40th anniversary of the famed album’s release this year and has said in interviews that he wrote every ballad—from the title track to “Jungleland”—within the home’s four walls during his stay from ’74 to ’75

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Green Design, Technology, Transportation, Urban Design

Every day the NYC subway carries more than 1.3 million riders to all corners of our fair city. A feat yes, but if you’re a rush hour commuter, you know the hellish conditions that can arise when trying to pack several hundred (though it can feel like thousands) of people into a line of sardine cans. If you’re one of the many who constantly curse the MTA, try not to get too green-eyed as you read on.

As it turns out, our neighbors in grid-locked Secaucus, New Jersey are gearing up to test a out new form of solar-powered public transit called JPods. This innovative new system uses a combination of light rail and self-driving car suspended above roads, and unlike the NYC subway, you can leave your running shoes at home. This rail network is designed to get you as close to your final destination as possible.

More on the new venture here

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