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George Steinmetz, New York Air: The View From Above, National Geographic, NYC aerial photography,

Earlier this week, 6sqft shared National Geographic’s interactive map of what the NYC skyline will look like in 2020. To accompany it, the publication has released a piece by New York’s resident journalist Pete Hammill, in which he “reflects on 72 years of transformation as his hometown is continuously rebuilt.” Hammill laments on loss (Ebbets Field, the old Madison Square Garden, and Stillman’s Gym, to name a few), but says of the present-day city that it’s “in a bad way.” Though he says New York is “wealthier and healthier” than when he was young, he feels that “its architectural face is colder, more remote, less human, seeming to be sneering.”

While describing the shadow-casting supertalls and influx of the super-rich, Hammill points to the stunning aerial photography of George Steinmetz, since “the best view of New York might be from above.” Steinmetz’s photos, taken from a self-designed helicopter, appear in the December issue of National Geographic magazine as an illustration to Hammill’s essay. They’re part of his new book “New York Air: The View from Above.” We’ve chosen five of our favorite photos that represent the changing landscape of New York City.

See them here

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Features, Interviews, New Yorker Spotlight, People, photography

Ira Block photographer, National Geographic magazine, world photographers, Ira Block

Ira with a camel and a local in the desert of Morocco, © Connor Dugan

When Ira Block leaves his New York City apartment for work, he might find himself on the way to Bhutan or Mongolia. As a photojournalist who has covered more than 30 stories for National Geographic magazine and National Geographic Traveler, Ira travels the world photographing some of its greatest marvels. He’s captured everything from far-off landscapes to people and animals to discoveries made at archaeology sites.

In between trips to Asia, Ira spends time photographing baseball in Cuba. The project has afforded him the opportunity to catch the country on the cusp of change. His first images showing Cuba’s passion for the sport, mixed in with its beautiful but complex landscape, are on display at the Sports Center at Chelsea Piers.

We recently spoke with Ira about traveling the globe for work and how his career and passion have shaped his relationship with New York.

Our interview with Ira right this way

Daily Link Fix

5Pointz, graffiti museum, Long Island City developments, aerosol art
  • West Village Gets NYC’s First Bitcoin ATM: Yes, a bitcoin ATM has come to the city. Gothamist reports that “the machine will only allow customers with bitcoin wallets to deposit cash to purchase the currency.”
  • Tomato Plants That Can Grow 24 Hours A Day: Tomatoes are very sensitive plants and being under an artificial light can sometimes stunt growth and even cause them to die. Scientists in the Netherlands have claimed they’ve been able to solve both problems. Learn more on Modern Farmer.
  • RIP 5Pointz: Animal New York says 5Pointz is being demolished as we speak. Someone pass us some tissues!
  • Explore The Okavango Delta Without Leaving Home: National Geographic hosted a Google Hangout this morning live from Botswana’s Okavango Delta, which is home to the largest elephant population and has also been named one of the world’s treasures. Check out the recording of the Hangout.

Photo via Wikimedia Commons