Metropolitan Museum of Art

Art, Events

Installation view of Héctor Zamora (b. 1974, Mexico), The Roof Garden Commission: Héctor Zamora, Lattice Detour, 2020. Courtesy of the Artist. Image credit: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Photo by Anna-Marie Kellen

When the Metropolitan Museum of Art reopens on August 29, this year’s eighth annual installation on the Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Roof Garden will also be on view. Titled Lattice Detour, the work by Mexican artist Héctor Zamora tackles a prevalent symbol in today’s society–the wall. The 11-foot-tall work deliberately screens views of Central Park and the skyline to evoke the feeling of a barrier to viewers. But the bricks are stacked on their sides, thereby letting in light and air and referencing the latticed celosía walls that are used for shade and ventilation in the Middle East, Africa, Iberia, and Latin America.

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Products, Shop

The Metropolitan Museum of Art is marking its 150th anniversary this year, and as part of the celebration, they’re embarking on new exhibits and collaborations, one of which is this fun partnership with The Sill. The “Met 150 Edit” is a multi-designer capsule collection from the plant company that features limited-edition earthenware planters and fun art-inspired message pops (“Vincent Van Grow” and “Untitled Greens #1”).

Shop the collection here

Art, Events, Museums

The Met reveals facade banners designed by Yoko Ono

By Dana Schulz, Fri, August 21, 2020

Yoko Ono (b. 1933, Japan), DREAM TOGETHER, 2020, installed at The Metropolitan Museum of Art © Yoko Ono. Image credit: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Photo by Anna-Marie Kellen.

For the first time, the Metropolitan Museum of Art is displaying artist-designed banners on its Fifth Avenue facade, and they’re from none other than Yoko Ono. Titled DREAM TOGETHER, the 24′ x 26′ banners read “DREAM” and “TOGETHER,” and were revealed in anticipation of the museum’s reopening on August 29th. Ono created the piece in response to the global COVID-19 crisis, offering “a powerful message of hope and unity to the world,” according to the Met.

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Art, Events, Museums

Photo (cropped) by Alex Proimos via Wikimedia Commons

The Metropolitan Museum of Art has announced two new sculpture commissions to be installed in the museum’s facade niches and the Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Roof Garden later this year. Mexican artist Héctor Zamora will create a site-specific intervention on the roof titled Lattice Detour that’s set to open on April 21. On September 9, American artist Carol Bove will unveil new sculptures in the building’s Fifth Avenue facade niches, becoming only the second artist to activate the building’s exterior in this way. The works are still in progress but Sheena Wagstaff, the Met’s Leonard A. Lauder Chairman of Modern and Contemporary Art, hinted that Zamora’s piece will “invite us to reconsider the panoramic view of the city skyline” and Bove’s installation will feature “colorful stylized abstractions.”

More details

Art, Museums

Photos by Anna-Marie Kellen

Two new paintings by Canadian Cree artist Kent Monkman are now on view in the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Great Hall. As part of a new series in which the museum invites contemporary artists to make work in response to the Met collection, Monkman reappropriated motifs from Western artists such as Emanuel Leutze and Eugéne Delacroix to tell a different narrative that foregrounds themes of arrival, migration, displacement, and the Indigenous experience.

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Featured Story

Art, Events, Features, Museums, NYC Guides

Spring art guide, The Roof Garden Commission: Alicja Kwade, ParaPivot, the met, Alicja Kwade

Alicja Kwade, ParaPivot. Image credit: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Photograph by Hyla Skopitz.

New York City’s art scene blossoms anew in springtime, with fresh ways to look at classic museum collections, international art fairs, cutting-edge installations and everything in between. And new public works pop up in the city’s parks and gardens, making it possible to enjoy both the outdoors and the art. We’ve rounded up a list of must-see exhibits, fairs, and installations to get you started.

Check out our top spring picks

Museums, Policy

Image via Pexels

When the Metropolitan Museum of Art announced it would start charging non-New Yorkers $25 for admission and waive its pay-what-you-wish policy for the first time since 1970, most people reacted with disapproval. But there was an under-the-radar benefit to this new policy: The Met agreed to share a portion of the new revenue from admission fees with the city, to be used by the Department of Cultural Affairs in support of the CreateNYC plan. A year after the admission fees went into effect, the de Blasio administration has announced that $2.8 million in additional funding will be allocated to over 175 cultural organizations in underserved communities throughout the five boroughs.

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Art, Upper East Side

The Frick will take over the Breuer building from the Met

By Michelle Cohen, Wed, September 26, 2018

The Met Breuer. Image courtesy of the Metropolitan Museum.

It was announced Friday that the Met Museum would lease the Breuer building to the Frick, the New York Times reports. According to an agreement between the two venerable art institutions, the Metropolitan Museum of Art will likely sign the Met Breuer on Madison Avenue over to the Frick Collection beginning in 2020. Doing so would allow the in-debt Met to free itself of the last three years of an eight-year lease and an $18 million annual expense and enable it to put funds toward improving the modern and contemporary galleries at its Fifth Avenue flagship. Likewise, the Frick would have a suitable temporary home while the Gilded Age mansion that it inhabits is being renovated.

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Art, Museums

Photo via The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Following two years of renovations, the Metropolitan Museum of Art reopened its impressive music collection, which includes roughly 5,000 instruments dating from about 300 B.C. to the present, grouping them by period and type, rather than culture by which they were created. The redesign of the exhibit, called The Art of Music, places “Fanfare” as the first gallery. Drawing visitors into the instrument gallery, Fanfare features 74 brass instruments “spanning two millennia and five continents.” It includes sacred conches, animal horns, a vuvuzela and more. And now, for the first time, the instruments can be heard through dynamic kiosks at the museum, or online.

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Architecture, Art, Museums

Diller Scofidio + Renfo, Heavenly Bodies exhibit, Met Costume Institute, Metropolitan Museum of Art

On Monday night, Rihanna, Madonna and all of the celebrity A-listers posed on the Met Gala’s red carpet to show off their over-the-top interpretations of the Metropolitan Museum’s 2018 Costume Institute exhibit “Heavenly Bodies: Fashion and the Catholic Imagination.” This year’s exhibit focuses on the dialogue between fashion and medieval art, displaying Papal robes and accessories from the Sistine Chapel, many of which have never been seen outside The Vatican. To house it all, the Met tapped architecture firm Diller Scofidio + Renfo (DS+R) to design the show, and ArchDaily has uncovered this gorgeous photo set showing their work.

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Archtober2020