Madison Square Park

Featured Story

Art, Art nerd ny, Events, Features

Tim Okamura, Chris Marshall, Lori Zimmer, Soraya Doolbaz, Museum at FIT, Susanne Bartsch, Bundith Phunsombatlert, Cuchifritos, Madison Square Park, Fata morgana, Shepard Fairey, Jacob Lewis Gallery, Metropolitan Opera Company, Times Square Arts, Verdi, Otello, Gerrit Roessler, and Samantha Levin, A Sommers

In a city where hundreds of interesting happenings occur each week, it can be hard to pick and choose your way to a fulfilling life. Art Nerd‘s philosophy is a combination of observation, participation, education and of course a party to create the ultimate well-rounded week. Jump ahead for Art Nerd founder Lori Zimmer’s top picks for 6sqft readers!

The time has come again for me to flex my curatorial muscle and shamelessly self-promote your next favorite exhibition. This Friday and Saturday, join me in celebrating the work of Tim Okamura and Chris Marshall at our two day pop-up show. But if you can’t make that, there is of course other art to be had this week; revisit the beautiful sculpture in Madison Square Park with a live poetry accompaniment, brave the crowds for Shepard Fairey’s new show in Chelsea, or check out a curated night of performance, art and socializing at The Happening. For something ENTIRELY different, help support testicular cancer (while taking a look at some extraordinary dick pics) at Soraya Doolbaz’s Dicture Gallery. The incredible world of night life maven Susanne Bartsch will take over the Museum at FIT, and the Met Opera welcomes all to its opening night performance, which will be transmitted live to screens in Times Square.

All the best events to check out here

Architecture, condos, New Developments, Nomad

*** Update via the development team: Interior renderings from ASJNY are only conceptual and do not represent the actual project moving forward.

Here’s our first look at what the residences of a highly anticipated condo conversion at 212 Fifth Avenue could look like. In March we revealed a set of whimsical renderings for a conceptual design whipped up by the visualization artists ASJNY.

The actual plan going forward, approved by the Landmarks Preservation Commission this past April, calls for a more sensitive touch. In addition to carving out 48 homes, the 1913 neo-gothic building’s ground-level storefronts will be renovated, its parapets reconstructed, and the tower’s stately limestone, terra-cotta and brick exterior will be restored, which may entail creating some additional windows.

More details ahead

Daily Link Fix

urban explorer, David Karnauch, brooklyn bridge, selfie stick, instagram
  • The NYPD is pissed at a selfie stick wielding tourist who climbed the Brooklyn Bridge for an Instagram-worthy photo. [Animal]
  • You could downsize, get a Manhattan Mini Storage unit, or you can drop $65,000 on a steel cage in the basement of a luxury building. [Bloomberg Business]
  • See the Manhattan isle fold onto itself like in “Inception” with BERG’s “Here & There” maps. [Untapped Cities]
  • The re-designed Madison Square Park Shake Shack may be considered new and improved, but the lead designer of the original joint thinks it’s an “aesthetic disaster.” [Architect’s Newspaper]
  • Everything you need to know about chowing down at One World Trade‘s One Dine, One Mix and One Cafe–pretty original names right? [Eater]

Images: The notorious Brooklyn Bridge selfie (L); Steel cage via Bloomberg (R)

Featured Story

Features, History, Madison Square, Nomad

madison square park

Recent reports show that NoMad has taken over the top spot for priciest neighborhood in the city in which to rent, with a one-bedroom unit going for an average of $4,270/month. For most real estate aficionados this isn’t shocking, as the neighborhood has been growing into one of the city’s hottest spots for the past several years, but few know of the area’s fascinating past.

Named for our fourth president, James Madison, the 6.2-acre Madison Square Park was first used as a potter’s field, then an army arsenal, then a military parade ground and finally as the New York House of Refuge children’s shelter, until it was destroyed by a fire in 1839. After the fire, the land between 23rd and 26th Streets from Fifth to Madison Avenues was established as a public park enclosed by a cast-iron fence in 1847. The redesign included pedestrian walkways, lush shrubbery, open lawns, fountains, benches and monuments and is actually similar to the park that exists today.

Find out how our beloved madison square park came to be

Featured Story

Features, Madison Square, real estate trends, Starchitecture

One Madison: A Modern Marvel on Madison Square

By Dana Schulz, Thu, August 28, 2014

One Madison , One Madison Triple Penthouse

When it comes to New York City real estate, many people liken fluctuating prices to the chicken-or-egg phenomenon: does a building transform a neighborhood or does construction follow the most up-and-coming areas?

In the case of One Madison, the super sleek 60-story, high-rise tower that is home to a media mogul, a supermodel, and star quarterback, gentrification had already taken hold in the larger NoMad area when construction began on the building in 2006.

Take a look at the towering building and how it became one of the city’s top-sellers

Neighborhoods

NoMad-North of Madison Square Park

New York’s ever-changing culture is reflected in the surge of new neighborhood names that have sprung up recently — LeDel (below Delancey Street), RAMBO (right around the Manhattan Bridge Overpass), or, one of the most inventive, BoCoCa (the area that is intersected by Boerum Hill, Cobble Hill, and Carroll Gardens). Fortunately or unfortunately, none of these creative monikers have stuck. One that has, though, is NoMad (north of Madison Square Park), bound by 25th Street, 30th Street, Avenue of the Americas, and Lexington Avenue.

NoMad has become a go-to place for culture, food, business, and residential opportunities. During the last five years, the neighborhood has seen price-per-square-foot averages rise by 40 percent; the average price per square foot for a condo is now $1,791 compared with $1,279 in 2010.

How did this transformation in NoMad occur? Find out here.

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