Le Corbusier

Featured Story

Architecture, Features, Historic Homes

Aluminaire House Rear Facade

In a 1932 article in Modern Mechanix magazine, the design of this three-story Long Island “skyscraper house” was touted as the “latest in homes,” with an all-metal frame and glass walls. What the story doesn’t mention is that this little house in the ‘burbs was designed as a case study home by noted architects Albert Frey (who spent his early years in Le Corbusier‘s studio) and A. Lawrence Kocher. Known as the Aluminaire House, this diminutive dwelling is among the earliest examples of European-inspired modern architecture in the eastern U.S.. It was included by Philip Johnson in a MoMA exhibit in 1931 that later became the manifesto for the International Style of architecture–one of only six American buildings in the show to exemplify the style.

With the Coachella music festival in the recent spotlight, visions of Palm Springs-style desert homes have been popping up at every turn, and though this little skyscraper house couldn’t be further away geographically, its co-creator Albert Frey is known for establishing the “desert modernism” style exemplified in those iconic Palm Springs homes. And as with many ideas in the ultra-creative 1930s, the construction of this Modernist gem in 1931 was well ahead of its time.

Find out more about the story and future of Aluminaire House

Weekly Highlights

Weekly Highlights: Top Picks from the 6sqft Staff

By Dana Schulz, Sat, November 22, 2014

Pier 55, Hudson River Park Trust, Barry Diller

This Week’s Features

Images: Rendering of Pier 55 park via Heatherwick Studio (L); Forest Hills Gardens via Joe Shlabotnik via photopin cc (R)

Featured Story

Architecture, Features, History, Stuyvesant Town

Towers in the Park: Le Corbusier’s Influence in NYC

By Dana Schulz, Wed, November 19, 2014

le corbusier nyc

Stuyvesant Town Oval via Marianne O’Leary via photopin cc

Any architecture history student or design nerd knows about Le Corbusier (1887-1965), one of the founders of modern architecture and a truly one-of-a-kind urban planner. For those of you who aren’t as familiar with Charles-Édouard Jeanneret-Gris (his given name; he was French-Swiss), one of his most noteworthy urban ideas was concept of “towers in the park.” Part of his Contemporary City plan (and later Radiant City plan) to house three million inhabitants as a way to deal with overcrowding and slums, towers in the park were skyscrapers set in large, rectangular tracts of lands with open space between the buildings.

Whether they were consciously influenced by Le Corbusier or not, many projects in New York City mimic his vision of towers in the park, and we’ve decided to take a look at the most well known of this architectural crop, as well as some other ways the famous architect left his mark on NYC.

Take a look at NYC’s towers in the park

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