landmarks

Brooklyn, Bushwick, Landmarks Preservation Commission, More Top Stories

Streetview of 25-29 Linden Street © Google 2022

A collection of rowhouses representing a variety of distinct architectural styles in Brooklyn may become the city’s next historic district. The Landmarks Preservation Commission (LPC) on Tuesday voted to calendar the Linden Street Historic District, which consists of a group of 32 intact brick and brownstone row houses in Bushwick. Located on Linden Street between Broadway and Bushwick Avenue, the rowhouses are designed in varying late-19th-century architectural styles that give them a distinct look and strong sense of place, according to the commission.

Find out more

Cool Listings, Tribeca

All photos © Travis Mark

Designed by prominent New York City architect Stephen Decatur Hatch, the six-story building at 451 Washington Street was constructed as a warehouse in 1891 and converted to co-ops in the 1970s. Citing its striking combination of neo-Flemish and Romanesque Revival architectural styles, the city’s Landmarks Preservation Commission designated the Fleming Smith Warehouse as a landmark in 1978. One of the 19th-century building’s six co-op apartments hit the market recently, asking $3,495,000 for a three-bedroom corner loft.

See it here

History, Landmarks Preservation Commission

Photo of the scenic landmark Central Park, courtesy of the Landmarks Preservation Commission

The city’s Landmarks Preservation Commission on Thursday launched the LPC Designation Photo Collection, a digital photo archive with high-resolution images of designated landmarks and historic districts. Now the public can easily search, explore, and download photos of landmarked properties and neighborhoods without requesting them from the commission first. The service will also be helpful for property owners, architects, and contractors who work on historic properties.

Find out more

Brooklyn, Flatbush, Landmarks Preservation Commission, Prospect-Lefferts Gardens

Photo of Parkside Avenue courtesy of LPC

A tree-lined block in Brooklyn with architecturally distinctive homes may become the city’s newest historic district. The Landmarks Preservation Commission (LPC) on Tuesday voted to calendar the Melrose Parkside Historic District, which consists of 38 intact single and two-family row houses built by two of Brooklyn’s most renowned architects, Benjamin Driesler and Axel S. Hedman. Located on Parkside Avenue between Flatbush and Bedford Avenue in Prospect Lefferts Gardens, the collection of homes has a distinct appearance and sense of place in the surrounding neighborhood due to the use of “neo-Classical vocabulary” in their architectural style, according to the commission.

See more here

Architecture, History

TWA Hotel, TWA, JFK Airport

Photo: TWA Hotel/David Mitchell

The state last week awarded ten projects with historic preservation awards, and nominated a dozen other sites to be nominated for the state and national historic places registers. Gov. Andrew Cuomo and the Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation recognized the TWA Hotel at JFK Airport for its preservation of Eero Saarinen’s Trans World Airlines terminal, which serves as the lobby for a new 512-room hotel.

Learn more

Central Park South, Policy

Photos via Public Domain Pictures and Flickr cc

Gov. Andrew Cuomo announced yesterday that New York City’s Central Park-adjacent monument to Christopher Columbus has been listed on the State Register of Historic Places by the New York State Board for Historic Preservation. Cuomo also recommended the 76-foot rostral column statue, erected in 1892 by the city’s Italian-American community, for listing in the National Register of Historic Places. The statue was the subject of controversy earlier this year after violent white supremacist groups in Charlottesville, Virgina protested the city’s plan to remove a statue of Robert E. Lee. Mayor Bill De Blasio announced the statue would remain, following a 90-day review of the city’s monuments by a mayoral advisory commission.

Find out more

gentrification, Policy

The city’s preservation groups have reported that the results of a series of studies, prompted by the 50th anniversary of the city’s Landmarks Law, have put some numbers behind the claim that landmarking doesn’t harm, and may actually improve, the economic balance of neighborhood development and growth. According to Simeon Bankoff, executive director of the Historic Districts Council, “This is the first time which preservationists–who tend to be from the humanities and subsequently math-averse–have put real data behind anecdotes.” The combined reports represent the most comprehensive study to date of the impacts of historic preservation in New York City.

Find out what the numbers say

Design, Products

Pop Chart Lab, Splendid Structures of NYC, The Schematic of Structures

Want to bring a little bit of the city into your home, but tired of the standard black-and-white photos of landmarks or graphic maps that can be found at every craft fair these days? Why not frame this lovely print called Splendid Structures of New York City? Based on Brooklyn-based Pop Chart Lab‘s popular print The Schematic of Structures, this new design takes iconic NYC structures like the Statue of Liberty and One World Trade Center, along with local landmarks such as the Unisphere and Wyckoff House, and presents them in a hand-illustrated, blueprint-like style.

See the full print here

SIGN UP FOR OUR NEWSLETTERS

Thank you, your sign-up request was successful!
This email address is already subscribed, thank you!
Please provide a valid email address.
Please complete the CAPTCHA.
Oops. Something went wrong. Please try again later.