Ken Griffin

Central Park South, Recent Sales

220 Central Park SOuth, Vornado, Robert A.M., Stern

Via Vornado Realty Trust and Robert A.M. Stern Architects

Billionaire Ken Griffin really likes 220 Central Park South. The hedge fund mogul picked up two more apartments at the Robert A.M. Stern-designed skyscraper last month, less than a year after he bought a record-breaking $240 million penthouse there. The New York Post first spotted the sales, which includes apartments 20H for $1.89 million and 20J for $2.06 million, bringing his total investments at the property to roughly $244 million.

And another one

Policy, real estate trends

Via Flickr

Calls for a pied-à-terre tax have increased since billionaire Ken Griffin closed on a penthouse at 220 Central Park South for over $239 million. The sale shattered the existing record of the most expensive home sold in the US by $100 million but Griffin will only be using the residence as “a place to stay when he’s in town.” City Council Members Mark Levine and Margaret Chin recently announced support for a bill that was first drafted by Sen. Brad Hoylman five years ago, which would place a yearly surcharge of 0.5% to 4% on secondary residences worth more than $5 million. In a statement released on Wednesday, State Budget Director Robert Mujica added his support, stating that a pied-à-terre tax could be combined with other revenue solutions to help fund the Metropolitan Transportation Authority’s $40 billion in capital needs.

More info

Central Park South, Policy

220 Central Park SOuth, Vornado, Robert A.M., Stern

220 Central Park South. Image via Vornado Realty Trust and Robert A.M. Stern Architects.

We’ve heard it before, but it’s always a shock to hear about how the city’s tax system undervalues big-ticket apartments in expensive neighborhoods. The Wall Street Journal reports that the effective tax rate on billionaire hedge funder Ken Griffin’s sky mansion at 220 Central Park South comes out to about 0.22 percent–compared with about one percent in the city’s less affluent neighborhoods. The reasoning behind this is tied to a complicated city property tax system that assesses all co-ops and condos as if they were rental properties. Rental income at nearby buildings is assessed in order to estimate a condo’s value.

What’s going on here?

Policy, real estate trends

Pied-à-terre tax backed by NYC Council members

By Devin Gannon, Tue, February 26, 2019

220 Central Park SOuth, Vornado, Robert A.M., Stern

Via Vornado Realty Trust and Robert A.M. Stern Architects

Update 2/26/19: Council Members Mark Levine and Margaret Chin announced on Monday that they plan on introducing a resolution in support of the pied-à-terre tax, as amNY reported. The tax would be modeled after the measure sponsored by State Sen. Brad Hoylman and apply an annual surcharge on non-primary homes worth more than $5 million.

Last month, billionaire Ken Griffin closed on a penthouse at 220 Central Park South for over $239 million, making it the most expensive home ever sold in the United States. Griffin, the founder of the hedge fund Citadel, said he will not use the pricey pad as a primary residence, but instead as “a place to stay when he’s in town.” The staggering sale has renewed support from public officials for a pied-à-terre tax, which would place a yearly surcharge on homes worth $5 million and up, and apply to non-primary residences, as reported by the New York Times.

Learn more

Central Park South, Recent Sales

220 Central Park SOuth, Vornado, Robert A.M., Stern

Via Vornado Realty Trust and Robert A.M. Stern Architects

Update 1/29/19: The penthouse officially closed on January 23, 2019, for $239,958,219, more than was originally reported.

Billionaire Ken Griffin has closed on a penthouse at 220 Central Park South for $238 million, setting the record for the most expensive home ever sold in the United States, as the Wall Street Journal first reported. Griffin, who founded Citadel, first signed the contract to buy a 24,000-square-foot unit at the under-construction tower in 2015. The hedge fund mogul reportedly picked up the pricey digs as “a place to stay when he’s in town,” since his company is looking to expand its footprint in New York City.

More on record-breaking deal

Midtown, New Developments

Rendering of MoMA renovation Via Diller Scofidio + Renfro

Just this week, it came to light that the Metropolitan Museum of Art may lay off as many as 100 employees as part of efforts to cut its $30 million deficit. As the New York Times previously explored, the struggling state of the Met exemplifies a shift in the art world towards modern and contemporary art. And standing as a true testament to this is MoMA’s current financial status.

The midtown museum has already raised $650 million towards its fundraising campaign, far exceeding the $450 million needed for its planned renovation and addition of three new gallery floors. In addition, they’ll also sell $280 million of tax-exempt bonds “to raise money for the project and refinance debt as borrowing costs drop to the lowest on record,” reports Crain’s.

More details ahead

Central Park South, Midtown, Recent Sales

220 central park south, robert am stern, billionaire's row

We first got wind of the potentially record-setting penthouse listing at 220 Central Park South back in March, when it was reported that the unit could sell for between $150 and $175 million. In June, sources said that a Qatari billionaire was looking to combine multiple apartments in the Robert A.M. Stern-designed building to create a $250 million mega-penthouse. Then last month, the Post speculated that another high-profile buyer was Ken Griffin, the billionaire hedge fun tycoon who is currently in the midst of a messy divorce from wife Anne Dias-Griffin (she’s asking for $1 million a month in child support). Now the paper reveals that it’s Griffin who’s looking to snatch up the $200 million+ penthouse in what’s being called the “billionaire’s bunker.”

More details this way

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