John Pawson

Architecture, Design, Hamptons

Montauk House, John Pawson,

This beach house, designed on the shores of Montauk by John Pawson, is anything but flashy. Instead, the goal was to blend the building with its surroundings–“to engage naturally with the flow of the dune,” as Pawson put it. It’s almost reminiscent of the Salk Institute, a complex designed by Louis Kahn in La Jolla, California that powerfully engages with the Pacific Ocean. Here, the home barely peeks above all the beachfront brush surrounding the Atlantic. And from the interior, numerous decks look like they’re extending naturally into the sand. This is the type of getaway that’ll really make you feel one with nature.

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Architecture, condos, Lower East Side, New Developments, Starchitecture

Herzog & de Meuron’s 215 Chrystie Street Reaches Full Height; Only Three Units Remain

By Ondel Hylton and Heather Cooper Vivares, Wed, April 6, 2016

215 Chrystie Street, Hezog & de Meuron, Ian Schrager, NYC Hotels, Condos 2 (1)

Last November, 6sqft reported that Ian Schrager and the Witkoff Group’s upcoming hotel/condominium building 215 Chrystie Street had just made its way past the midway point. Now, the “tough-luxe” Bowery development has reached its full apex, 314 feet to the mechanical bulkhead, dominating the low-slung skyline of the Lower East Side.

The mixed-use development will have a 356-room PUBLIC Hotel from Ian Schrager along its lower levels, topped by 11 limited condominium residences. Pritzker Prize-winning firm Herzog & de Meuron, with Beyer Blinder Belle as architects of record, designed the arthropod-esque, concrete-framed building.

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Architecture, condos, Construction Update, Hotels, Lower East Side, New Developments, Starchitecture

The structure of Ian Schrager/Witkoff Group’s 26-story hotel/condominium combo 215 Chrystie Street is now more than half way up, giving us a clearer view of the “tough-luxe” exterior composed of raw concrete and large clear glass panes.

Designed by Pritzker Prize-winning firm Herzog & de Meuron, with Handel Architects as architects of record, the tower’s lower levels feature a highly-textured facade of inwardly-tilting columns framing expansive clear panes of glass. The tilt creates slightly more interior space, and from ground level, increases the amount of reflection in the glass, thus providing more privacy for guests. According to the firm’s webpage on the project, “The structure of the building is pushed to the exterior and follows the grid of the large floor-to-ceiling window bays. This introduces a depth to the façade on the exterior and liberates the interior from freestanding columns.”

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