jetblue

Long Island City

Photo courtesy of sarahtarno on Flickr

The iconic red Pepsi-Cola sign in Long Island City got a new look on Tuesday. In partnership with the soda company, JetBlue began installing this week an illuminated logo, a blue arrow, and a picture of an airplane on the sign that overlooks the East River, as first reported by the Wall Street Journal. The signage, which will only be up until Oct. 1, advertises the airline’s switch from serving Coca-Cola to PepsiCo products earlier this summer.

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City Living

The founder of #1000BlackGirlBooks 14-year-old Marley Dias (pictured above), has partnered with the initiative as an ambassador; photo courtesy of JetBlue

After runs in cities like Detroit, San Francisco, Oakland, and Washington D.C., JetBlue’s free book vending machine program “Soar with Reading” is coming to New York City. The literacy initiative aims to create more access to age-appropriate books in underserved communities. JetBlue will install six vending machines—one in each borough and two in Queens—and will restock and rotate new titles every two weeks, with options available in both English and Spanish.

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Major Developments, Queens, Transportation

John F. Kennedy International Airport, JFK airport, Governor Andrew Cuomo, Tishman Construction Company

Rendering of JFK Airport via Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s office

JetBlue Airways this week selected RXR Realty and Vantage Airport Group to lead its planned terminal expansion at John F. Kennedy International Airport. The project, estimated to cost between $2 billion and $3 billion, will add larger gates in order to fit wider planes. JetBlue, which currently operates out of JFK’s Terminal 5, will expand across to Terminal 6 and possibly Terminal 7, according to the Wall Street Journal. The proposed expansion comes over a year after Gov. Andrew Cuomo announced a $10 billion overhaul of JFK, aimed at expanding and redeveloping terminals, redesigning on-airport roadways for easier access and adding more dining and retail options. The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, the agency which oversees the airport’s operations, will work with JetBlue about if and when the project can proceed.

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Architecture, Hotels, Queens, Transportation

Eero Saarinen, JFK Airport, MCR development, Mid-century Modern, Neo-Futurist, TWA Terminal

After sitting vacant at JFK Airport for 14 years as a vestige of jet-age architecture, Eero Saarinen‘s iconic 1962 TWA Flight Terminal received a new life in the summer of 2015 when it was announced that the neo-futurist structure would be reborn as a high-end hotel. MCR Development teamed up with JetBlue and the Port Authority to develop a “505-room LEED-certified hotel with restaurants, 40,000 square feet of meeting space and a 10,000-square-foot observation deck,” as 6sqft previously described. Initial reports referred to the project as the “TWA Flight Center Hotel,” but the Times now confirms that it’ll simply be the “TWA Hotel.” And with construction four months in, Curbed noticed that signage for the hotel has gone up, preserving the airline’s logo and font.

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Architecture, Queens, Transportation

Eero Saarinen, JFK Airport, MCR development, Mid-century Modern, Neo-Futurist, TWA Terminal

Image courtesy of Beyer Blinder Belle

No longer will the fate of Eero Saarinen’s architectural masterpiece sit in limbo, Crain’s reports that the iconic structure will indeed be made into a hotel, developed through a partnership between MCR Development and JetBlue. The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey chose the pair amongst a “field of several competitors” bidding for the job, and the decision will be formally announced at the agency’s board meeting next week. As we previously reported, the new destination will be known as the TWA Flight Center Hotel.

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