Jersey City

Architecture, Design, Interiors, New Jersey

wells fargo loft, jeff jordan architects, jersey city lofts

Located in the historic 1890 Wells Fargo building, the Wells Fargo Loft was originally used for the company’s horses and city carts. The loft, located at 299 Pavonia Avenue in Jersey City, was redesigned over the last few decades, but most recently by Jeff Jordan Architects in 2016 (h/t Architizer), who took full advantage of the ceiling heights ranging from 14 to 50 feet and amazing NYC views. To create a better live-work balance, the architects removed and reconfigured walls for a clearer separation between art studio and living spaces by using plywood and ample storage space.

See inside the unique loft

Major Developments, New Developments, New Jersey

99 Hudson Street, Jersey City, NJ tallest building

While Jersey City boasts beautiful views of Manhattan, the NJ water-front community continues to build up its own impressive skyline. In the last twenty years, 15 towers reaching more than 500 feet tall have been built, with seven more in the works. Notably, as CityRealty discovered, the latest tower rising in Jersey City at 99 Hudson Street will be the state’s tallest building, reaching a height of 889 feet. When the condominium’s construction is complete in 2019, the tower will be the 15th tallest in the country, outside of New York and Chicago.

Find out more

Design, Interiors, New Jersey

The New Design Project decked out a young couple’s urban residence with bursts of bold color, texture, and geometry, transforming the rustic Jersey City loft into a vibrant modern oasis. Integrated into the interior decor are several modern pieces, strategically placed among playful accents and ethnic touches–an unexpected yet seamless integration of various styles that’s become synonymous with the work of this edgy design duo.

Take a look

Featured Story

Features, New Jersey, Urban Design

A Google Earth rendering of future Journal Square. Created by CityRealty

The migration of the New York development rush over to Jersey City was no surprise. Located along the waterfront, Jersey City boasts impressive views of the skyline and easy access into Manhattan from the PATH train. But as new development arrived at a rapid pace, it has resulted in rising prices and a lack of developable land. That’s caused developers to look inland in search of other Jersey City neighborhoods ripe for new development. Journal Square, the area surrounding the Journal Square PATH station, has clearly emerged as the new frontier. “We’re betting tens of millions of dollars that in the next 10 years, the neighborhood will be a brand on par with Brooklyn,” says Ken Pasternack, chairman of KABR Group, an active Journal Square developer.

SEE WHAT’S ON THE RISE IN JOURNAL SQUARE…

Architecture, Landscape Architecture, New Jersey, Urban Design

Jersey City, So+So Studio, public infrastructure, elevated park, Green Villain, The Bergen Arches, Erie Cut

Architecture firm So+So Studio has proposed a new vision for New Jersey’s Bergen Arches, an abandoned four-track cut of the Erie Railroad that runs one mile through the Palisides. The site has remained unused, overgrown, and forgotten since the last train ran in 1959. So+So, however, sees a much more lively vision for the tracks, and they’ve teamed up with Green Villain, a Jersey City place-making organization, and local residents to turn the unused space into a locale for artistic and leisure activity.

Dubbed “The Cut,” the project is both architectural and landscape-based, calling for an elevated system of ramps and walkways that will take participants under canopies, through sculpture gardens, and into graffiti-tunnels more than 60 feet below ground. With the public park, So+So hopes to promote contemporary local artists as well as expose decades of preserved graffiti and art that line the forgotten landscape.

see more here

Featured Story

Architecture, Carter Uncut, Features, New Jersey, real estate trends, Urban Design

jersey city skyline

Carter Uncut brings New York City’s latest development news under the critical eye of resident architecture critic Carter B. Horsley. Here, Carter brings us his seventh installment of “Skyline Wars,” a series that examines the explosive and unprecedented supertall phenomenon that is transforming the city’s silhouette. In this post Carter looks at the new New Jersey skyline.

The hulking, 781-foot-high Goldman Sachs tower at 30 Hudson Street in Jersey City is like the Rock of Gilbraltar to Lower Manhattan’s famed skyline: massive and impressive. To some, perhaps, it conjures a Monty Python catapult or a very steep cliff on which to mount the Guns of Navarone for an assault on Lower Manhattan. It dominates the Jersey City skyline, which is a bit Spartan, especially in comparison with Brooklyn’s. Most of the skyscrapers in Brooklyn, however, are not directly on the waterfront and the Goldman tower is very much “in your face” on the water. Furthermore, all of a relative sudden, Jersey City is about to explode with three taller towers, which I can only describe as delirious, dancing, shimmy-shimmy-shake buildings with drop-dead vistas of Manhattan and the Hudson.

read more from carter here

New Jersey, Urban Design

Kevin Shane, Jeff Jordan Architects, Liberty Bridge, pedestrian bridge NYC, Hudson River bridge

Jersey City resident Kevin Shane was sick and tired of the traffic and faulty mass transit that impeded his trip into the city. Like many Jerseyites, he longed for a way to get across the river by foot or bicycle. But unlike everyone else, he stopped complaining and enlisted Jeff Jordan Architects to get the ball rolling. The firm has envisioned a 5,000-foot pedestrian bridge between Jersey City and Battery Park City. The proposal is certainly ambitious, but as Curbed notes, not entirely far-fetched considering the Hudson River is only about a mile wide. Dubbed the Liberty Bridge, it touts High Line-like features such as views from 200+ feet, plantings, ADA-compliant access points, integrated seating, public art, solar panels, free wifi, and cafes and shops.

More details and renderings right this way

Real Estate Wire

Jersey City
  • Taking a look at the cultural rise of Jersey City. [NYT]
  • Why are Brooklyn neighborhoods getting so hard to tell apart? [NYO]
  • Landmarks Preservation Commission denies BKSK Architect’s glass topper proposal for Tammany Hall. [Curbed]
  • Manhattan’s getting 14 million square feet of office space by 2019. [WSJ]

Images: Jersey City via Singing With Light via photopin cc (L); BKSK’s proposal for Tammany Hall (R)

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Archtober2020