Howard Hughes Corporation

Restaurants, South Street Seaport

The Central Market; Renderings courtesy of Roman and Williams Buildings and Interiors

Ahead of next year’s opening of the huge foodie destination from world-renowned Chef Jean-Georges Vongerichten in the South Street Seaport, we’re getting a first look at the 53,000-square-foot space. Several restaurants and bars, fast-casual concepts, and a sprawling central market will open at the Tin Building, a restored early 20th-century waterfront structure that once housed the iconic Fulton Fish Market.

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Landmarks Preservation Commission, Major Developments, Museums, New Developments, South Street Seaport

The approved design. All renderings courtesy of Skidmore, Owings & Merrill / Howard Hughes Corporation

The Landmarks Preservation Commission on Tuesday voted to approve plans for a debated mixed-use project and a new museum in the South Street Seaport. The Howard Hughes Corporation presented a revised proposal for 250 Water Street that includes one 324-foot tower to be built on a parking lot instead of the two 470-foot structures originally proposed in January. The project also involves constructing a new building for the South Street Seaport Museum at 89 South Street.

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Landmarks Preservation Commission, Restaurants, South Street Seaport

Renderings by Mancini Duffy, courtesy of the Landmarks Preservation Commission

While the Howard Hughes Corporation has so far failed to get their South Street Seaport residential project approved, even with a scaled-down design, another plan from the developer in the same neighborhood was given the green light on Tuesday. The Landmarks Preservation Commission voted to approve plans for an open-air restaurant and bar that would sit in front of the Tin Building, which was home to the original Fulton Fish Market and is now being reconstructed. The accepted proposal differs quite significantly from the one first presented last July; it’s in a new location with a design by a different architecture firm.

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Landmarks Preservation Commission, Major Developments, Museums, New Developments, South Street Seaport

All renderings courtesy of Skidmore, Owings & Merrill / Howard Hughes Corporation

Plans to construct two 470-foot towers and expand a museum in the historic South Street Seaport neighborhood were met with mixed feedback during a public Landmarks Preservation Commission hearing on Tuesday. The Howard Hughes Corporation presented a proposal for a $1.4 billion mixed-use project consisting of rentals, condos, and office space at 250 Water Street, as well as a new building for the South Street Seaport Museum at 89 South Street. While those in favor of the project say it will bring much-needed affordable housing to a neighborhood that has almost none and help the museum stay open, opponents claim the project is out of scale with the rest of the district. New renderings of the proposed expanded museum show plans for a copper-clad exterior, flexible gallery space, an outdoor terrace, and a connection to the historic structure.

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affordable housing, Major Developments, New Developments, South Street Seaport

All renderings courtesy of The Howard Hughes Corporation/SOM

The Howard Hughes Corporation on Thursday unveiled its latest effort to redevelop the South Street Seaport neighborhood. The $1.4 billion proposal includes the construction of two 470-foot towers which would contain rentals, condos, and office space on a parking lot at 250 Water Street. Initial plans from the developer called for a single tower that would rise nearly 1,000 feet, but local residents and Community Board 1 opposed it. Designed by Skidmore, Owings & Merrill, the two towers would include 360 units, with at least 100 apartments set aside for families earning 40 percent of the area median income. It would be the first affordable housing built in the community under the city’s Mandatory Inclusionary Housing program.

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Design, Landmarks Preservation Commission, Restaurants, South Street Seaport

View from John Street Rendering courtesy of Woods Bagot/ NYC Parks

An open-air waterfront restaurant and bar could be coming to the South Street Seaport Historic District. The Howard Hughes Corporation and the city’s Parks Department on Tuesday presented a proposal to the Landmarks Preservation Commission for a new concession along the East River Esplanade under the FDR Drive overpass. Designed by Woods Bagot, the “Blockhouse Bar” would be a year-round establishment, with plans to add decking over the pavement, planters, and vinyl coverings during the winter months.

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Landmarks Preservation Commission, South Street Seaport

Rendering by Visualhouse, courtesy of the Rockwell Group and Howard Hughes Corporation

Update 9/19/18: The LPC approved Howard Hughes’ and David Rockwell’s proposal.

It might still be steamy outside, but the colder months are upon us, and this year, NYC will have a brand new ice skating rink. CityRealty uncovered renderings that show how the Howard Hughes Corporation would like to transform the South Street Seaport’s Pier 17–the SHoP Architects-designed food/drink, retail, and entertainment complex–into a rooftop winter village. The proposal by David Rockwell Group calls for an ice rink just slightly smaller than that at Rockefeller Center, a skate shop, and a warming hut. The team is presenting the plan to the Landmarks Preservation Commission (Pier 17 is part of the South Street Seaport Historic District) this afternoon, so check back for updates on the vote.

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Architecture, Design, Landmarks Preservation Commission, New Developments, South Street Seaport

Between the controversial–and eventually nixed–condo tower and the news of ESPN’s new studio plans, it’s hard to keep up with what’s taking shape at Pier 17 in the Seaport district. The latest arrival comes from above: Developers Howard Hughes Corporation announced plans earlier this year for a “crown jewel” for the new pier, a rooftop stage and installation with a see-through canopy that will maintain sightlines of Lower Manhattan. The high-tech topper was designed by German architect Achim Menges, known for ethereal, high-concept structures made with 3-D printers or woven from carbon fibers. Set for a summer 2018 opening, the new performance space will occupy 60,000 square feet according to Downtown Express. The project on Tuesday was approved by the Landmarks Preservation Commission, who said it will “set a standard for all future temporary seasonal structures.”

Renderings of the high-tech sky canopy this way

New Developments, South Street Seaport

Pier 17 glows red in honor of new tenant ESPN. Photo: Taylor Crothers via Howard Hughes Corporation.

Cable giant ESPN will be opening a big new studio–the sports network’s first in NYC–this spring at the South Street Seaport Pier 17 complex in Howard Hughes Corporation’s $731 million East River waterfront redevelopment project. The New York Post reports that the network’s studio partner, NEP group, has signed a multi-year lease for a 19,000-square-foot third floor space with Brooklyn and Manhattan skyline views at the new pier.

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Financial District, New Developments

80 south street tower, city planning commission, air rights

Diagram of 80 South Street proposal, via Oceanwide Holdings

After a long-planned but never executed plan to develop buildings at 80 South Street and 163 Front Street in the South Street Seaport, the site’s owner has officially filed demolition permits at both buildings, Curbed learned. As 6sqft previously covered, the Howard Hughes Corporation sold 80 South Street to China Oceanwide Holdings for $390 million last March. Although the developer hasn’t released construction plans yet, the building is expected to be 113 stories tall, reaching an impressive 1,436 feet (to give you an idea of just how tall this is, 432 Park is 1,396 feet tall, and One World Trade Center is 1,368 feet tall by roof height).

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