Howard Hughes Corporation

Landmarks Preservation Commission, South Street Seaport

Rendering by Visualhouse, courtesy of the Rockwell Group and Howard Hughes Corporation

Update 9/19/18: The LPC approved Howard Hughes’ and David Rockwell’s proposal.

It might still be steamy outside, but the colder months are upon us, and this year, NYC will have a brand new ice skating rink. CityRealty uncovered renderings that show how the Howard Hughes Corporation would like to transform the South Street Seaport’s Pier 17–the SHoP Architects-designed food/drink, retail, and entertainment complex–into a rooftop winter village. The proposal by David Rockwell Group calls for an ice rink just slightly smaller than that at Rockefeller Center, a skate shop, and a warming hut. The team is presenting the plan to the Landmarks Preservation Commission (Pier 17 is part of the South Street Seaport Historic District) this afternoon, so check back for updates on the vote.

Check out all the renderings

Architecture, Design, Landmarks Preservation Commission, New Developments, South Street Seaport

Between the controversial–and eventually nixed–condo tower and the news of ESPN’s new studio plans, it’s hard to keep up with what’s taking shape at Pier 17 in the Seaport district. The latest arrival comes from above: Developers Howard Hughes Corporation announced plans earlier this year for a “crown jewel” for the new pier, a rooftop stage and installation with a see-through canopy that will maintain sightlines of Lower Manhattan. The high-tech topper was designed by German architect Achim Menges, known for ethereal, high-concept structures made with 3-D printers or woven from carbon fibers. Set for a summer 2018 opening, the new performance space will occupy 60,000 square feet according to Downtown Express. The project on Tuesday was approved by the Landmarks Preservation Commission, who said it will “set a standard for all future temporary seasonal structures.”

Renderings of the high-tech sky canopy this way

New Developments, South Street Seaport

Pier 17 glows red in honor of new tenant ESPN. Photo: Taylor Crothers via Howard Hughes Corporation.

Cable giant ESPN will be opening a big new studio–the sports network’s first in NYC–this spring at the South Street Seaport Pier 17 complex in Howard Hughes Corporation’s $731 million East River waterfront redevelopment project. The New York Post reports that the network’s studio partner, NEP group, has signed a multi-year lease for a 19,000-square-foot third floor space with Brooklyn and Manhattan skyline views at the new pier.

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Financial District, New Developments

80 south street tower, city planning commission, air rights

Diagram of 80 South Street proposal, via Oceanwide Holdings

After a long-planned but never executed plan to develop buildings at 80 South Street and 163 Front Street in the South Street Seaport, the site’s owner has officially filed demolition permits at both buildings, Curbed learned. As 6sqft previously covered, the Howard Hughes Corporation sold 80 South Street to China Oceanwide Holdings for $390 million last March. Although the developer hasn’t released construction plans yet, the building is expected to be 113 stories tall, reaching an impressive 1,436 feet (to give you an idea of just how tall this is, 432 Park is 1,396 feet tall, and One World Trade Center is 1,368 feet tall by roof height).

More details ahead

Architecture, Major Developments, South Street Seaport

South Street Seaport, Fulton Market Building, 11 Fulton Street, SHoP Architects, Howard Hughes Corporation

Though they didn’t have much luck with their controversial tower at the Seaport, SHoP Architects and the Howard Hughes Corporation have gotten approvals for their revamp of the historic, 1983 Fulton Market Building. Yimby reports that on Tuesday, the Landmarks Preservation Commission approved the revised design for the building’s exterior, which alters the signage from the original 2014 proposal. To show how the signs will look, SHoP prepared several new renderings of the site.

See them all here

Architecture, Financial District, New Developments

80 south street tower, city planning commission, air rights

The sale of 80 South Street from Howard Hughes Corp. to China Oceanwide Holdings has been finalized, reports The Real Deal. The $390 million deal was first announced in August, but closing was contingent on Howard Hughes transferring an additional 303,113 square feet in air rights to the address after already securing 104,167 square feet. With this, 80 South Street’s development potential has grown to 817,784 square feet and a tower of 1,436 feet (to put this in perspective, 432 Park is 1,396 feet tall, while 1 WTC is 1,368 feet tall by roof height) with 113 floors could soon rise on the site which has sat in redevelopment limbo for over a decade.

more here

Major Developments, South Street Seaport

shop architects south street seaport

Rendering of the proposed 494-foot tower via SHoP Architects

The long-plagued condo tower designed by SHoP Architects for the Fulton Fish Market site at the South Street Seaport has been nixed, according to statements made by the Howard Hughes Corporation at a community board meeting last night. DNAinfo, who first reported on the fate of the 494-foot tower, says that the developer will instead construct a “not tall” commercial building at what’s now known as the New Market Building site.

More details

Major Developments, Restaurants, South Street Seaport

SHoP Architects, tin building, Howard Hughes Corporation, South Street Seaportal

Rendering of the revamped Tin Building via SHoP Architects

Perhaps spearheaded by the Smorgasburg foodie culture, putting multiple local food vendors in one place has become a recipe for success in NYC development projects. There’s the Hudson Eats food hall at office-filled Brookfield Place, the forthcoming food court by Anthony Bourdain at Pier 57, Danny Meyer’s possible giant food hall at Hudson Yards, the 55-vendor Dekalb Market Hall planned for Downtown Brooklyn’s City Point, and the food hall at Sunset Park‘s Industry City, to name just a few. So it comes as no surprise that the South Street Seaport redevelopment will boast not one, but two massive food halls.

The Post reports that none other than three Michelin-starred chef Jean-Georges Vongerichten (ABC Kitchen, the Mercer Kitchen, and JoJo are just a few of his famed restaurants) will be spearheading the foodie revolution at the Howard Hughes Corporation’s $1.5 billion mega-development. According to the paper, “The great chef and his business partner Phil Suarez have signed a lease/partnership contract with NYSE-listed Hughes to launch two major Seaport projects — a 40,000 square-foot, seafood-themed marketplace inside the Tin Building and a 10,000 square-foot restaurant in a rebuilt Pier 17.” Both are expected to open in 2017.

Find out more right here

condos, New Developments, South Street Seaport

80 south street new york

Rendering created by CityRealty based on the reported height

There’s no slowing down the city’s supertall boom. Crain’s reports yet another 1,000-foot plus tall tower could soon be joining the New York City skyline, rising at the combined sites of 80 South Street and 163 Front Street. Chinese investment company China Oceanwide Holdings released a statement saying they would be purchasing the development parcels for $390 million through a U.S. subsidiary from current owner Howard Hughes Corporation. The new tower will sit just south of the South Street Seaport, and amid a grouping of other tall, but not quite as tall, towers.

FInd out more here

Architecture, Major Developments, South Street Seaport, Urban Design

shop architects south street seaport

Rendering of the proposed tower

Less than a week after it was revealed that the Howard Hughes Corporation paid $31 million for more than 300,000 square feet of air rights at the South Street Seaport, it looks like the entire $1.5 billion redevelopment project could be stalled. The overall plan would breathe new life into the downtown historic district by rehabilitating crumbling piers, preserving and finding new use for landmark buildings and constructing a 42-story waterfront condo tower at the foot of Beekman Street. And it’s this last point that has local officials, civic groups, preservationists and some community residents worried or downright angry.

The 494-foot-tall, SHoP Architects-designed tower has already been scaled back from its original 650 feet, but concerned parties still feel that the building would “obscure views of the Brooklyn Bridge and clash with the low-scaled, early-19th-century brick buildings that make up the 11-block seaport district, once the center of the city’s maritime industry,” according to the New York Times.

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