Frank Lloyd Wright

Celebrities, Cool Listings, Historic Homes, Starchitecture

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Did you know that Frank Lloyd Wright was once a resident of The Plaza? Neither did we! The Post reports that the 4,000-square-foot pad the prolific architect briefly called home has just hit the market for $39.5 million. Wright lived in the corner apartment of the storied building from 1954 to 1959 while he was working on the Guggenheim Museum. The location right by Central Park—and a 30-minute walk from the site of his iconic creation—must certainly have bode well for the architect’s creative juices.

Inside Wright’s former digs here

Daily Link Fix

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  • The Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation’s website gets a beautiful overhaul that includes a comprehensive, searchable database of the architect’s works. [Fast Co. Design]
  • Tour a tiny, pattern-filled Chinatown studio. [The Cut]
  • The French bulldog was the most popular dog breed in NYC in 2014. See what breed reigned supreme in your neighborhood. [DNAinfo]
  • Second annual Lower East Side History Month is announced for May. [Bowery Boogie]

Images: Frank Lloyd Wright’s Fallingwater (L); French Bulldogs (R)

Daily Link Fix

  • Because we all need a hug sometimes…here’s a weighted blanket that gives you a warm embrace. [Design Milk]
  • Dinner parties inside a dumpster aim to change the way people see food waste. [Untapped]
  • Watch Frank Lloyd Wright compete on the game show What’s My Line in 1956. [Archinect]
  • Staten Island’s deer population has increased 3,304 percent in just six years. [The Verge]
  • There’s a new face gym at the South Street Seaport. That’s right, a gym to “exercise” the skin on your face. [DNAinfo]

Images: The Weight via Mia Cinelli (L); Frank Lloyd Wright on What’s My Line (R)

Featured Story

Architecture, Features, History, Starchitecture

Frank Lloyd Wright Designs Destined for NYC But Never Built

By Jason Carpenter, Tue, September 2, 2014

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Many wonder why such a prolific and famous architect as Frank Lloyd Wright didn’t have more buildings in New York City. It’s safe to say he wasn’t a huge fan of urban density, but how could one possibly create something as iconic as the Guggenheim’s spirals without getting any other work in the city? As we showed in a previous post, two Wright designs have actually been demolished. Now, we will look at the two buildings Wright intended for the New York area which were never fully realized—at least, not in Manhattan.

See the Frank Lloyd Wright designs here

Starchitecture, Transportation, Upstate

Filling up the ole’ gas tank is not a glamorous job, and usually not a task that leaves one marveling at the surrounding architecture.  But in 1927, Prairie-style extraordinaire Frank Lloyd Wright put together plans for a fuel filling station in Buffalo, New York that would leave even the most seasoned driver awe struck.

Now, almost 90 years later, the Buffalo Transportation Pierce-Arrow Museum has realized Wright’s vision and constructed the station as a one-of-a-kind installation housed in a 40,000-square-foot glass and steel atrium, made possible by a $6.3 million state grant. The arts-and-crafts gas station, the third Wright recreation in Buffalo, makes a nod to Native American design and thoughtfully mixes practicality with visual appeal.

Take a virtual tour of the architectural masterpiece

Featured Story

Architecture, Features, History, Manhattan, Midtown East

A model home at the Usonian Exhibition Pavilion in NYC

Frank Lloyd Wright is one of architecture’s most important figures, and you can see his work in five countries and 37 of 50 states. But when it comes to New York City, there is only one major Wright construction to be found: The Guggenheim. There is also a pre-fab house in Staten Island and one in Blauvelt just north of the city, but what other work did he do in the five boroughs? It turns out that Wright designed two other major projects in NYC, but both have been demolished. Here’s a look at these lost works by the great architect.

See the historic Frank Lloyd Wright works here

Architecture, Cool Listings, Green Design, Interiors

48 Clausland Mountain Road (also known as the Socrates Zaferiou House) designed by Frank Lloyd Wright

Frank Lloyd Wright has put his stamp on some of the world’s most famous and recognizable structures, including New York City’s own Guggenheim Museum.

But did you know the prolific architect was also the forefather of a revolutionary style of residential housing that informed the airy, open floor plans seen in many modern homes today? Wright’s Prairie style took hold in the Midwest during the early 20th-century and quickly spread across the country, profoundly influencing the built landscape we know today. If you’ve ever wanted to live in an iconic Wright home, this could be your chance: One of the few prefab Prairie homes designed by the architect has hit the market, and it’s just a quick half-hour drive from Manhattan.

Take a tour of the retro, mid-century property

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