Frank Gehry

Architecture, Starchitecture, Technology

Google Earth, Frank Gehry, New York by Gehry

As part of its relaunch, Google Earth, a program that allows users to explore the planet virtually, now features guided tours of projects by various architects, like Frank Gehry and the late Zaha Hadid. As ArchDaily learned, the relaunch allows users to orbit the entire globe in 3D, instead of simply exploring isolated cities. It also enhanced the web application’s accessibility, with searches within the app providing snapshots of information about the places. Plus, using the app is free of charge and users do not have to pay or install any software.

Explore the Google Earth relaunch

Chelsea, Starchitecture

IAC Building, Frank Gehry

Frank Gehry’s IAC Building was completed in 2006 for Barry Diller’s media company InterActiveCorp. It was Gehry’s first project in NYC, boasting his signature curving facade and ushering in a wave of starchitect-designed projects along Eleventh Avenue in Chelsea. It also gained notability for its full-height, double-glazed window panes that fade from clear to white, giving the 10-story structure the look of an iceberg. But it’s this feature that’s now resulted in a lawsuit, according to the Post, who reports that “the window sealant has become a dripping, opaque blob.”

Find out more

Celebrities, People, Starchitecture

frank gehry

Outspoken starchitect Frank Gehry is taking the whole “I’m moving if Trump wins” thing quite literally. The Canadian-born, LA-based architect told French paper La Croix just before the election that President Francois Hollande assured him he could go into exile in France if Trump became president. But as ArtNet points out, a possible relocation may have more to do with a personal beef than political leanings. In 2010, Gehry’s 8 Spruce Street surpassed Trump World Tower as the city’s tallest residential building, and we know how feisty the Donald gets when it comes to size…

The rest of the story

Design, Starchitecture

frank gehry yacht

In between designing international museums and giving journalists the finger, Frank Gehry likes to unwind at sea. The lifelong yachtsman just last year designed a 74-foot wooden sailboat alongside naval architect Germán Frers for real estate bigwig Richard Cohen. While the yacht has thus far been reserved for Cohen’s private use, according to Gehry in an interview with Sotheby’s (h/t LLNYC), another wealthy seafarer can now raise its sails for a mere $100,000.

more details here

Featured Story

Architecture, Battery Park City, Carter Uncut, Features, Financial District, History, opinion, Urban Design

Skyline Wars: In Lower Manhattan, A New Downtown Is Emerging

By Carter B. Horsley, Mon, April 18, 2016

carters view downtown manhattan

Carter Uncut brings New York City’s latest development news under the critical eye of resident architecture critic Carter B. Horsley. This week Carter brings us his fourth installment of “Skyline Wars,” a series that examines the explosive and unprecedented supertall phenomenon that is transforming the city’s silhouette. In this post Carter looks at the evolution of the Lower Manhattan skyline.

Lower Manhattan at the start of the Great Depression was the world’s most famous and influential skyline when 70 Pine, 20 Exchange Place, 1 and 40 Wall Street, and the Woolworth and Singer buildings inspired the world with their romantic silhouettes in a relatively balanced reach for the sky centered around the tip of Lower Manhattan.

Midtown was not asleep at the switch and countered with the great Empire State, the spectacular Chrysler and 30 Rockefeller Plaza but they were scattered and could not topple the aggregate visual power and lure of Lower Manhattan and its proverbial “view from the 40th floor” as the hallowed precinct of corporate America until the end of World War II.

The convenience and elegance of Midtown, however, became increasingly irresistible to many.

More on the the history of Lower Manhattan and what’s in store

New Developments, opinion, Polls, Starchitecture, Urban Design

Before 9/11, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum planned a new outpost on the East River in Lower Manhattan, sculpted by none other than starchitect Frank Gehry. But after the tragedy, the project was scratched. Now, the planned South Street Seaport project would replace the area’s main pier with a lower, glass structure that looks like a surburban mall at the base of a new 40-something-story tower on the former site of the Fulton Fish Market. But 6sqft’s Architecture Writer Carter B. Horsley thinks the Howard Hughes Corporation should abandon the current SHoP Architects-designed plan and replace it with a resurrected version of Gehry’s fabulous, titanium ribbon-laced Guggenheim vision. Do you agree?

Images: Guggenheim Bilbao by Frank Gehry via Wiki Commons (L); Current South Street Seaport plan via SHoP Architects (R)

[Related: Unleash Gehry: Give Frank the East River and Churn the Lower Manhattan Pot]

Featured Story

Carter Uncut, Features, New Developments, opinion, Starchitecture, Urban Design

frank gehry bilbao museum

Image: Frank Gehry against his design for the Guggenheim in Bilbao, Spain

The Foundation Louis Vuitton in the Bois de Bologne in Paris recently opened and was another kudo for architect Frank O. Gehry whose Bilbao, Spain, branch of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in 1999 was widely regarded as the most important architecture project since the opening of the Pompidou Center in Paris in 1975. All these projects are Deconstructivist; they don’t fit easily into boxes and are not symmetrical. Their aesthetic tends to be chaotic, disorganized, aggressive, random and definitely unconventional, but also absolutely heroic, proud and defiant.

The Pompidou Center was huge and intimidating, a gargantuan power plant for some unfinished but gaily painted super ocean liner. By comparison, the Guggenheim was a shiny swirl of silvery metal cascading by its riverfront location in a staccato flurry of flamenco stomps. Vuitton is a whole other gesture altogether; an organic amorphous form about to devour a city, formed of glass, wood and concrete in rearing and overlapping fashion, a mad dash about enclosure.

All of these might just amount to a sophisticated bowl of cherries for architecture aficionados, except that this project was a baby of Bernard Arnault, the head of the luxury conglomerate that runs not only Louis Vuitton, the purser, but also bubbler Moët & Chandon, sipper Hennessy, dazzler Bulgari and fashionistas Dior, Fendi and Givenchy—all One-Percent darlings. These, of course, are not the only platinum brands but they’ll certainly do in an all-so-sizzling and svelte pinch.

You may now ask what has all this to do with our city.

Read more here

Architecture, holidays, Starchitecture

architecture holiday cards, frank ghery middle finger

© Juan Martinez Gonzalez

Giving and getting holiday cards is always fun, but every so often you’ll receive one that really gets you giggling. This year, be the person handing off clever cards to your friends and family. ArchDaily has just announced their 2014 Holiday Card Contest winners, and for all of you design-minded folks and architecture nerds, they’ve got plenty of punny—and just downright cool—cards to choose from.

get the cards here

Daily Link Fix, Uncategorized

frank gehry
  • Yes, Frank Gehry literally gave today’s architecture the middle finger, saying that 98% of what’s built today is sh*t. Get more details on Dezeen.
  • Your Life on Earth by BBC on Archinect tells you how the world has changed since the day you were born. You’ll find out factoids like how many times your heart has beaten and how many volcanoes have erupted.
  • The Bronx’s only bookstore is saved! Barnes & Noble extended its lease for two years, according to Gothamist.
  • I Quant NY found the house in Brooklyn that is farthest away from the subway.
  • Impress your guests with this levitating, wireless speaker. Called Om/One, the orb is the creation of Oakland-based Om Audio. Check it out on Dwell.
  • Why do we drive on parkways and park on driveways? Mental Floss has the answer.

Images: Frank Gehry (L); Om/One via Om Audio (R)

Architecture, Starchitecture, Technology

frank gehry

It was big news last week that Frank Gehry’s designed plans for the Performing Arts Center at the World Trade Center were axed by execs of the site. Though he may have felt slightly snubbed, based on quotes he provided to the New York Times, Gehry seemed unaffected overall. His mellow reaction toward the dis is now further substantiated by news that his IT company Gehry Technologies has been acquired by American location technology firm Trimble (the owner of 3D drawing software SketchUp) in order to “transform the construction industry by further connecting the office to on-site construction technologies,” according to Trimble.

More on the starchitect’s new partnership here

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