design competition

Architecture

Flexible Materials Skyscraper, Evolo Competition, NYC skyscraper proposal

Yesterday, 6sqft shared a proposal for an inside-out Midtown tower that received an honorable mention in Evolo’s 2017 Skyscraper Competition. Another that made the list is the Flexible Materials Skyscraper, an idea for a Billionaires’ Row supertall with an exterior made of a new material that can be folded, cut, sewed, and turned over, falling into a pattern. The designers called it “draping,” and hope building skyscrapers with flexible materials will allow architects to explore a new model of building while also cutting down on the construction process.

See renderings of the skyscraper

Architecture

Evolo has announced the winners of its 2017 Skyscraper Competition, and though projects specific to NYC didn’t take the top spots this year, several of the honorable mentions looked at new ways to build high-rise projects in New York. This one, the Human Castell Skyscraper, comes from a New Zealand-based team who wanted to address the question “where does art end and architecture begin?” Inspired by the castells of ancient Catalonia, the designers eliminated exterior walls for the Midtown tower to open its insides out towards the city, tapping into the history of architecture using sculptural expression to speak of its inhabitants’ “myths and tales.”

More on the proposal ahead

Design, Landscape Architecture, Urban Design

LIBERTY MUSEUM NEW YORK: Freedom to the people, Social Justice Media, Statue of Liberty Museum, Jungwoo Ji, Bosuk Hur, Suk Lee, NYC design competition

Though plans were approved in November for the $70 million FXFOWLE-designed Statue of Liberty Museum, Archasm recently launched a speculative design competition for the site. Titled “LIBERTY MUSEUM NEW YORK: Freedom to the people,” the timely contest sought proposals that focused on civil and social justice, and ArchDaily now brings us the winning design from EUS+ Architects‘ Jungwoo Ji, Folio‘s Bosuk Hur, and Iowa State University student Suk Lee. The Korean designers were inspired by candlelight marches against social injustice in their home country and created an architectural landscape of water droplet-shaped modules that respond to global issues in real time. When a tweet about “dire events” is sent to the museum, the modules receive an electronic signal and moves to point toward the geographic location mentioned.

More looks and details on the design ahead

Architecture, Queens

Philip Johnson‘s iconic New York State Pavilion in Flushing Meadows-Corona Park was built for the 1964-65 World’s Fair, but has struggled in recent decades to find its purpose. Because of its architectural and cultural merit, however, preservations have made great strides in the past several years: a restoration task force secured $5.8 million for repairs in 2014; it received a $3 million paint job last fall; and now it’s creating quite the buzz thanks to an ideas competition put on by the the National Trust for Historic Preservation and People for the Pavilion (h/t WSJ).

The competition, which organizers hope could help drum up enough enthusiasm to aid in the $52 million total restoration, has drawn more than 250 submission, including wacky ideas like a cheeseburger museum, a giant time-telling machine, and a UFO landing pad to more practical functions like a brewery, hanging gardens, live-work space for artists, and event venues.

See some of the entries here

Architecture

Imagining 432 Park As a Giant Drone Control Terminal

By Dana Schulz, Fri, March 25, 2016

The Hive, 432 Park Avenue, Evolo Skyscraper Competition, drone control terminal

Yesterday 6sqft brought you the winning design from Evolo’s 2016 Skyscraper Competition, a proposal to dig down below Central Park, exposing the bedrock beneath and thereby freeing up space to build a horizontal skyscraper around its entire perimeter. The second-place entry is more traditional in the sense that it builds up, but it’s more outside-the-box when it comes to function.

Titled The Hive, the project reimagines 432 Park Avenue, the city’s tallest and most expensive residential building, as “a vertical control terminal for advanced flying drones that will provide personal and commercial services to residents of New York City.” By covering its facade in docking and charging stations, the building gets its hive-like appearance with the drones buzzing around like bees.

How does 432 Park get transformed into a giant drone control terminal?

Architecture, Urban Design

New York Horizon skyscraper, evolo competition winner 2016

Evolo has announced the winners of its 2016 Skyscraper Competition, and, somewhat ironically, the number-one spot goes to a proposal that doesn’t build up at all, but rather digs down.

New York Horizon was imagined by Yitan Sun and Jianshi Wu as a means to “reverse the traditional relationship between landscape and architecture, in a way that every occupiable space has direct connection to the nature.” The idea is to dig down, exposing the bedrock beneath Central Park and thereby freeing up space to build a horizontal skyscraper around its entire perimeter. The resulting structure would rise 1,000 feet and create seven square miles of interior space, 80 times that of the Empire State Building.

The rest of the specifics, this way

Architecture, Design

These days, the architecture conversation in NYC is all about the tallest, slenderest, and priciest towers. But while everyone has their eye on what’s going up, no one seems to be talking about what’s coming down to make it happen. That’s why this new design competition from the Storefront for Art and Architecture is so intriguing. “Taking Buildings Down” wants to expand the context of new development to include the entire life cycle of our built environment, and proposals are being accepted for “production of voids; the demolition of buildings, structures, and infrastructures; or the subtraction of objects and/or matter as a creative act.”

Read more

Daily Link Fix

narratively, wnyc, series, my secret new york sanctuary, quiet places in nyc, peace and quiet in nyc, rockaway beach, Quito Ziegler
  • Finding A Quiet Respite In The Loud, Busy City: As part of Narratively and WNYC’s “My Secret New York Sanctuary,” one New Yorker shares her secret place to recharge and think when things in the city get a bit too hectic.
  • Submit Your Birdhouse Design To NEST: Calling all architects and designers! NEST is looking for your most creative bird-friendly home for their upcoming gallery exhibition and auction. If the design sells, the designer can receive up to 50% of the sold price.
  • Baltimore Bus Stop Spells Out “Bus”: If you’ve ever had trouble finding the bus stop in NYC, maybe we should try to get this extremely literal sign that popped up in Baltimore last month. City Lab reports each letter can accommodate up to four people either laying down, sitting or standing.
  • Earbuds That Are Customized To Your Ear: New Yorkers need more from earbuds than a “universal ear.” We need ones that withstand crowded trains, “showtime,” awkward moments when your eyes meet someone else’s and when people come through the car panhandling. Cool Hunting featured Normal, an NYC-based company that provides in-store (or remote) scanning  for 3D-printed, premium sounding earbuds made specially for your “earhole.”

Architecture

architecture for humanity, cameron sinclair, dead prize, design competition

Architects and designers love getting and giving accolades, and rightly so—there are some stellar projects out there transforming the world that deserve recognition. However, Cameron Sinclair, the Executive Director of the Jolie-Pitt Foundation and co-founder of Architecture for Humanity, seems to be fed up with the lack of discourse when it comes bad design, and in response he’s just kicked off a new competition that aims to “honor” works that have inflicted serious harm on our environment. Called “Dead Prize“, Sinclair hopes that this award will recognize the bad, point out the failures, and hopefully inspire individuals to do something to rectify these designs against humanity.

More on the competition here

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