Dattner Architects

affordable housing, Bronx, housing lotteries

Van Cortlandt Green, Dattner Architects, affordable senior housing, NYC affordable housing lotteries, Riverdale real estate

It’s been widely noted that New York has an ever-growing population of low-income elders, and a new affordable housing project in Riverdale seeks to address the issue. Designed by Dattner Architects (who are also behind the Bronx’s huge West Farm Redevelopment Plan), the brand-new building at 6469 Broadway is known as Van Cortlandt Green and overlooks the park. It will offer 77 studios for $832/month for those age 62 and older. They’re available to one person earning between $26,430 and $36,300 annually and two persons earning between $26,430 and $41,460, according to the NYC HDC.

Find out how to apply

adaptive reuse, affordable housing, Harlem, housing lotteries, New Developments, Rentals

Dattner Architects, Residencess at P.S

Earlier this week, Curbed reported that one of the first affordable housing developments financed under Mayor Bill de Blasio’s housing plan will kick off its lottery today. The former school building at 525 West 145th Street in Hamilton Heights has been rehabbed into apartments and a community space and now goes by the name The Residences at PS 186.

The project will bring 78 sure-to-be-sought-after affordable apartments to low- and middle-income households earning between $18,729 and $142,400 per year. In all, there will be 19 studio units, 47 one-bedrooms, and 12 two-bedrooms available for various income ranges and household sizes. The cheapest units will be two studio apartments priced at $508 per month, available for single-person households earning between $18,789 -$24,200. Half of the units will be set aside for local residents and five percent for city employees.

Lots more details and find out if you qualify

Architecture, Chinatown, condos, Construction Update, Lower East Side, New Developments

New York Skyscrapers, Extell Development, NYC Condos, Chinatown apartments

Still in disbelief that a 68-story building (though it’s being marketed as 80 stories) could rise at the edge of Chinatown? Well behold One Manhattan Square‘s construction site, buzzing with activity and flagged by a stalwart kangaroo crane foreshadowing the 850-foot-tall tower to come. Unlike the Chinese investment market, Extell’s skyscraper is heading in one direction — up. And after more than a year of site preparation and foundation work, the first pieces of re-bar have emerged from their mucky surrounds and are peaking above the lot’s blue construction fences.

Get a look

Architecture, Hudson Square, New Developments, Urban Design

Spring Street Salt Shed, Dattner Architects, WXY, Tribeca, Hudson Square, Soho

Rendering of the Spring Street Salt Shed courtesy of Dattner Architects

Summer is coming to a close, and in a few months we’ll be navigating the city’s treacherous streets perfecting our penguin waddles and fine-tuning our black ice magna-vision. This winter season, downtown Manhattan residents may find a sliver of comfort knowing that the rock salt used to mitigate slippery streets will be stored in one of the most grandiose salt sheds on Earth.

Recently unshrouded, the Department of Sanitation’s 67-foot-tall Spring Street Salt Shed flaunts a prismatic concrete facade evoking the intriguing faceted forms of salt crystals. The award-winning design, crafted by the public works masters at Dattner Architects and WXY Architecture + Urban Design, comes with a sizable price tag of $10 million. The structure was crowned the “Taj Mahal of Salt” back in 2010, noting that it cost more than nine recently constructed city salt sheds combined. Nevertheless, even in its unpolished state, we have to admit this riverfront iceberg is pretty captivating. And despite its utilitarian use, its form is well-worthy of its prime Hudson Square locale.

More renderings and info right this way

affordable housing, Downtown Brooklyn, Fort Greene, New Developments, Rentals

Red Apple Group, John Catsimatidis, Brooklyn rentals, Dattner Architects, Goldstein Hill & West, Brooklyn developments

Construction has begun on the final building of the four-tower development on the western edge of Fort Greene. The 32-story tower at 86 Fleet Place will house 440 rental units and will be the culmination of a 15-year redevelopment of a low-slung, Robert Moses-era retail strip along Myrtle Avenue.

The developer of 86 Fleet, and three other sibling buildings to the east, is Red Apple Group’s CEO and owner John Catsimatidis, who we might better remember as the billionaire Republican candidate in the last mayoral election and the owner of the oft-maligned Gristedes grocery store chain. According to the Wall Street Journal, Red Apple picked up the 2.5-acre, four-block site for $500,000 from Long Island University in 1982. The site spans 900 feet along the southern frontage of Myrtle Avenue, between Flatbush Avenue Extension and Ashland Place, and shares its blocks with the Toren condominium to the west and the Fred Trump-built University Towers complex to the south.

More details on the development

Architecture, Lower East Side, Major Developments, New Developments

First Four Essex Crossing Buildings Revealed

By Dana Schulz, Thu, January 15, 2015

Essex Crossing, SHoP Architects

Rendering via SHoP Architects

After 45 years of sitting vacant on the Lower East Side, the failed SPURA (Seward Park Urban Renewal Area) project site is being transformed to a $1.1 billion, 1.65 million-square-foot, mixed-use mega-development anchored by 1,000 residential units and a mix of cultural, community, and retail facilities. We’ve gotten snippets here and there on what the Essex Crossing project will look like–such as the Andy Warhol Museum and a 14-screen movie theater–but now Curbed has revealed renderings of the development’s first four buildings.

Construction on phase one of the project, which will occupy sites one, two, five and six (there are nine sites in total), is expected to commence this spring, and the notable architects who will spearhead the charge are SHoP, Handel Architects, Beyer Blinder Belle and Dattner Architects.

See what these architects have planned for Essex Crossing

Architecture, Downtown Brooklyn, New Developments, Rentals, Urban Design

388 Schermerhorn Street, Dattner Architects, Brooklyn, skyscraper, Downtown Brooklyn

L to R: Williamsburg Savings Bank (One Hanson), The Brooklyner, 388 Bridge Street, Avalon Willoughby West, The Hub

Construction filings from the Department of Buildings have revealed that Douglas Steiner’s mixed use tower at 333 Schermerhorn Street, dubbed the Hub, will soar 30 feet higher than previously reported; making it the top contender for Brooklyn’s tallest building at 607-feet.

For more than 80 years, the title of Brooklyn’s tallest belonged to the 512-foot Williamsburg Savings Bank tower at 1 Hanson Place. With its beloved 4-sided clock tower and its majestic banking hall, the tower has stood in relative isolation since its construction in 1929. Bruce Ratner’s Atlantic Yards centerpiece building nicknamed “Miss Brooklyn,” was the first to challenge the tower’s dominance and was slated to soar more than 100-feet above the bank building’s dome. The proposal incited uproar from Brooklynites, leading to its eventual downsizing in 2006 to 511-feet, just one foot shorter than the neighboring bank building.

More about The Hub and Brooklyn’s tallest this way


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