Brooklyn

Cool Listings, Crown Heights, Interiors

925 Pacific Street, master bedroom, hello madison, hello living, crown heights

Hello Madison is a boutique condo building that was constructed at 925 Pacific Street, in Prospect Heights, by the Brooklyn developer Hello Living. Many of the developments feature glassy, bright and lofty apartments, and this one now on the market is no exception. It’s a one bedroom that’s maximizing space with a loft built upstairs. While both the loft and the apartment downstairs are compact, double heights windows and a terrace manage to lend a feeling of spaciousness.

See more of the loft

Brooklyn, Cool Listings, Interiors, Park Slope

127 Park Place, living room, park slope

As the listing says, this upper duplex apartment overlooks “the leafy treetops of Park Slope.” Located at 127 Park Place, a lovely brownstone and treelined block of the neighborhood, you do get a good view of Brooklyn from the windows. The interior isn’t too bad either, with high and detailed ceilings, fireplaces, the original wood floors, and plenty of other original details. There’s no outdoor space, but there is potential to build out a roof deck up top.

So how much does it cost to buy up half a historic townhouse? For three bedrooms and two-and-a-half bathrooms, the price tag comes in at $2.19 million. It’s high, but not too far off given that full townhouses in the neighborhood can go for $4 million.

Take the tour

Brooklyn, Clinton Hill, Cool Listings, Interiors

85 Hall Street, brooklyn, clinton hill, living room

This Clinton Hill townhouse is looking to stand out— it even has its very own website. Although it’s got a modest, albeit historic, three-story facade, a renovation has left its imprint on seemingly every room of the house. The floorplan has been opened up, the staircase rebuilt, and the fixtures replaced by materials imported from Italy. Pretty much everything has a modern touch while the exterior remains well preserved. If you’re a townhouse purist it may not be your cup of tea, but you’ll have to admit it’s unique. It’s currently on the market with a price tag of $1.795 million.

See more of it here

Bed Stuy, Cool Listings

44 Macon Street, Brownstone, Townhouse, Cool Listing, Brooklyn, Brooklyn townhouse for sale

For anyone looking to bet on Bed-Stuynot a bad idea, we hear–this classic three-family townhouse at 44 Macon Street could be a fine opportunity. While the $1.75 million ask for this 2,720 square-foot, 13-room home might have been unheard-of even five years ago, anything this charming under $2 million in brownstone Brooklyn is going to get some attention these days.

The multi-family layout gives you lots of options–while still getting the 1-3 family tax break. Currently set up as an upper duplex with two floor-through apartments below, there is one catch: There’s a tenant in place in the garden apartment, which won’t be delivered vacant; this should certainly be considered, but that leaves three floors, all tastefully renovated with a laid-back, loft-like aesthetic, to do as you please.

Check out this classic Bed-Stuy bet, this way

Celebrities, Cool Listings, Interiors

148 baltic street

Back in 2013, news that Michael Diamond—a.k.a. Beastie Boy Mike D—and his wife, Tamra Davis, had acquired a townhouse on a beautiful tree-lined Cobble Hill block and given it a creative and modern—yet totally livable—redesign led to a spate of articles showcasing the cool and quirky pad, including a New York Times house tour aptly titled “Licensed to Grill.” All the attention likely led to Diamond’s recent side project helping his architect friends design a new-construction townhouse in nearby Boerum Hill that recently sold for just under $5 million. Now the original Cobble Hill Beastie house at 148 Baltic Street is on the market for $5.65 million, funky custom toile wallpaper and all.

Tour the delightfully decorated townhouse, this way…

Cobble Hill, Cool Listings, Interiors

21 Warren Place, Warren Place Mews, Cobble Hill

The Warren Place Mews is one of the most charming blocks of Cobble Hill, if not all of Brooklyn. It’s a gated street with 34 modest brick cottages that face a private courtyard. The mews dates back to the 1870s, when it was built by wealthy merchant and philanthropist Alfred Tredway White. White advocated for housing for the working class and built affordable housing all around Brooklyn. These homes in particular were used as workman’s cottages. But the mews has come a long way since then. This home, at 21 Warren Place, is now on the market for $1.495 million.

See the interior here

Architecture, Landscape Architecture

barclays green roof

The 135,000-square-foot green roof planned for the SHoP Architects-designed Barclays Center is shaping up in readiness for its job of reducing noise from the arena, catching rainwater and looking good from below, though it won’t be publicly accessible. But here’s your chance to get on top and see all the work that’s being done in order to bring this project to life.

Watch the roof getting green, this way

Celebrities, Historic Homes

Eat Pray Love, Elizabeth Gilbert, Julia Roberts, Brooklyn, Historic Home, Cobble Hill,

The 19th century Cobble Hill carriage house featured in the Julia Roberts movie version of Elizabeth Gilbert’s “Eat Pray Love” has just sold for $6.25 million, according to the Observer. We’re reminded of the boho-fabulous Park Slope townhouse featured in Noah Baumbach’s “The Squid and the Whale,” which changed hands for its ask of $3.45 million back in 2012, so this may be a testament to how much the market has shifted since then–or one could compare indie film cred with Julia Roberts-grade mainstream appeal.

Either way, this charming 1840s former firehouse at 172 Pacific Street on a pretty, shade-dappled Cobble Hill block has cinematic qualities on its own. The home, which had been on the market for nearly a year, is unique even on this block of quaint 19th century houses.

Take a look inside here

Featured Story

Brooklyn, Features, History

Brooklyn, Biggie Smalls, Notorious B.I.G., Brooklyn, Fort Greene, Cafe Habana, Real Estate

The story behind cheese-aging facility Crown Finish Caves in Crown Heights tells of an enormous amount of risk and dedication to making something on a small scale; to doing one thing well. It also once again stirs the hive of buzz around today’s Brooklyn. Article after article raises the idea that Brooklyn’s moment as the new hot spot for excellence in food, culture and authentic, hand-crafted goods, is in some quarters regarded as trite and trendy hype with little substance to it.

For some, the underground cheese caves are just one more example: Cheese caves. How Brooklyn. Thirty feet below street level, in the lagering tunnels of a former brewery beneath the Monti Building in Crown Heights, Benton Brown and Susan Boyle spent several years renovating and creating “Brooklyn’s premier cheese-aging facility” complete with state-of-the-art humidity control and cooling systems. The couple created the 70-foot space with advice from the world’s top cheese experts; Crown Finish Caves opened in 2014. On an article in Cheese Notes, a commenter raves: “If I were a mouse, I would move to Crown Heights.”

More excellence and authenticity this way

Featured Story

City Living, Features, Goldilocks Blocks, Williamsburg

Goldilocks Blocks: Hope Street in Williamsburg

By Michelle Cohen, Wed, October 22, 2014

Hope Street, Williamsburg, Brooklyn

Between hyper-developed hotspots, main drags in up-and-comers, and those genuinely avoidable areas, there can often be found a city’s “just-right” zones. They aren’t commonly known, but these micro-neighborhoods often hide within them real estate gems coupled with perfectly offbeat vibes. Continuing our Goldilocks Blocks series, this week we look at Hope Street in Williamsburg, Brooklyn.

It’s hard to imagine any corner of Williamsburg that doesn’t embody some form of the neighborhood’s upscale hipster paradise. With the opening of The Gorbals restaurant–to excellent reviews–atop the 6th Street Urban Outfitters on the North Side and the South Side sprouting condos and charter schools, the term “prime Williamsburg” has become meaningless. But in every district there are places that retain that charming, slightly unruly je ne sais quoi. The four blocks that comprise Hope Street fit this description.

What makes Hope Street so ‘just right?’