bjarke ingels

Architecture, Polls

626 First Avenue, JDS Development, SHoP Architects, American Copper Buildings

When the SHoP Architects-designed American Copper Buildings were first revealed, it wasn’t as much their twisting silhouettes that made headlines as it was their diagonal, amenity-filled skybridge. The three-story bridge, boasting a lap pool and lounge and topped with private terraces, is located 300 feet above the street, the highest such structure in the city and a new concept in enticing residents to the luxury market. And just this week, Bjarke Ingels unveiled new views of his High Line towers, which will feature two skybridges. Though they’re much closer to the ground, they’re also planned as amenity spaces, which makes us wonder–is this architectural feature set to become a new trend in NYC?

Share your opinion here

condos, Meatpacking District, New Developments, Starchitecture

NYC starchitecture, 76 Eleventh Avenue, Bjarke Ingels, BIG Architecture, HFZ Capital, High Line towers

It was all the way back in November 2015 that 6sqft got a first look at Bjarke Ingels‘ pair of asymmetric, twisting towers along the High Line at 76 Eleventh Avenue. At the beginning of this year, the design changed to a simpler silhouette with more space in between the 28- and 38-story buildings, and now NY Yimby has revealed yet another group of renderings that reveal even more revisions.

The fresh images reveal the glass crowns at the 300- and 400-foot tops, the retail podium and plaza fronting the High Line, and two amenity-filled podium bridges that will connect the towers (an idea perhaps borrowed from SHoP’s American Cooper Buildings).

See all the renderings here

Apartment Deals, Friday 5, Starchitecture

Every Friday 6sqft is rounding up five of the best rental deals showcased on CityRealty.com’s newly launched no-fee rentals page, a space where house hunters can find the best concessions being offered by landlords across the city.

No longer are New York’s most distinguished and architecturally avant-garde residential buildings limited to condos and co-ops. With more design-attuned renters on the market, developers are tapping the world’s best architects to make their rental properties stand out. A spate of renowned designers have hit the city’s architectural scene as of late, including of-the-moment starchitect Bjarke Ingels, long-time favorite Robert A.M. Stern, and Pritzker Prize winner Christian de Portzamparc.

While rental prices in these properties are usually higher than average, these buildings provide condo-level finishes, gracious and unique layouts, and all the amenities a renter could wish for. The slowing rental market and the influx of hundreds of new apartments have compelled landlords to offer some short-lived deals and incentives to attract lease-signers. See our list below of the five most stunning new rental buildings that are now offering rental concessions.

See all the deals here

Midtown West, New Developments, Starchitecture

The lucky residents of Bjarke Ingels’ Via 57 West tetrahedron will not only get starchitecture bragging rights and access to the 22,000-square-foot courtyard and amenities such as a swimming pool and gold simulator, but they’ll also have a state-of-the-art, eight-screen movie theater right in the building.

According to the Wall Street Journal, the Durst Organization has teamed up with Landmark Theatres, owned by billionaire entrepreneurs Todd Wagner and Mark Cuban of “Shark Tank” fame. The 30,000-square-foot theater will take up residency within the 45,000 square feet of ground-floor retail space in Via, which will also welcome the American Kennel Club’s dog-care center and a location from Livanos Restaurant Group.

Find out more

Policy, Technology, Urban Design

“Not only is New York City going to build the cheapest, ugliest version of the big dumb wall, there’s a very good possibility that it won’t even be big enough.”

According to a recent Rolling Stone article titled “Can New York Be Saved in the Era of Global Warming?” the level of storm protection put in place to protect the city from future superstorms may fall short of the elegant solution that was originally promised. According to the story, the city funded a proposal–Danish firm Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG)’s winning submission in the Department of Housing and Urban Development’s Rebuild by Design contest–that involved a 10-mile barrier system that would protect Lower Manhattan from the ruinous effects of storm surges and sea-level rise. Called the Big U, the $540 million infrastructure project would be designed to contain parks and public spaces. But because of cost issues, the project may not materialize as planned.

Find out how the proposal may have changed

Major Developments, Midtown West, Polls

While Governor Cuomo is busy trying to make his plans for $3 billion in renovations at Penn Station a reality, developers are hot to come up with a new design for 2 Penn Plaza, the tower directly above the station and Madison Square Garden. Vornado Realty Trust, who owns roughly nine million square feet around Penn Station including 2 Penn Plaza, released renderings in March for a glassy, wave-like tower by starchitect of the moment Bjarke Ingels. The concept is quite a departure from the current, stale state of the site, but yesterday an even more futuristic idea came to the table. Brooklyn Capital Partners tapped AE Superlab to create a plan for the world’s tallest free-fall tower ride above the station. “Halo,” as it would be called, would rise 1,200 feet from the roof, have 11 cars, and move as quickly as 100 miles per hour, giving it a top-to-base free fall of about six seconds.

BIG’s design wouldn’t change much in the way of 2 Penn Plaza’s current configuration, but it would create more retail space at the base. Halo, though it would cost $637 million to build, claims it would bring in up to $38 million a year for the state. Since Brooklyn Capital is contending with Vornado Realty Trust and Related Companies to upgrade the space, we want to know which of these ideas you think is a better fit.

Vote for your choice!

Design, Furniture, Starchitecture

via 57 lounge chair by bjarke ingels

For those of us who love the unusual shape and dramatic angles of Bjarke Ingels‘ famed VIA 57 WEST tetrahedron, but aren’t in the market to pay $3,800 a month for a one-bedroom (or didn’t qualify for the building’s affordable housing lottery), there’s now a way to bring a piece of the starchitecture into our own homes.

Dezeen reveals the VIA57 chair, designed by Ingels for furniture brand Fritz Hansen along with KiBiSi to mark the completion of the pyramid-shaped building. “The rotated corners allow a variety of social configurations while also evoking the tetrahedronical geometry of its parent architecture,” he explains.

More this way

Featured Story

Architecture, Battery Park City, Carter Uncut, Features, Financial District, History, opinion, Urban Design

Skyline Wars: In Lower Manhattan, A New Downtown Is Emerging

By Carter B. Horsley, Mon, April 18, 2016

carters view downtown manhattan

Carter Uncut brings New York City’s latest development news under the critical eye of resident architecture critic Carter B. Horsley. This week Carter brings us his fourth installment of “Skyline Wars,” a series that examines the explosive and unprecedented supertall phenomenon that is transforming the city’s silhouette. In this post Carter looks at the evolution of the Lower Manhattan skyline.

Lower Manhattan at the start of the Great Depression was the world’s most famous and influential skyline when 70 Pine, 20 Exchange Place, 1 and 40 Wall Street, and the Woolworth and Singer buildings inspired the world with their romantic silhouettes in a relatively balanced reach for the sky centered around the tip of Lower Manhattan.

Midtown was not asleep at the switch and countered with the great Empire State, the spectacular Chrysler and 30 Rockefeller Plaza but they were scattered and could not topple the aggregate visual power and lure of Lower Manhattan and its proverbial “view from the 40th floor” as the hallowed precinct of corporate America until the end of World War II.

The convenience and elegance of Midtown, however, became increasingly irresistible to many.

More on the the history of Lower Manhattan and what’s in store

Architecture, Midtown West, Starchitecture

og:image, Bjarke Ingels' Penn Plaza design

Another day, another reveal from Danish wunderkind Bjarke Ingels. This time the starchitect has taken on a project at much-loathed Penn Station, transforming 2 Penn Plaza (the tower directly above the station and Madison Square Garden) from a nondescript, monolithic slab to a shiny, playful tower. The renderings, first spotted by NY Yimby, show a somewhat typical glass mass, but the fun begins above the ground levels, where a wave-like canopy of glass panels ushers people in to a new retail base.

More details on the proposal

Hell's Kitchen, Midtown West, New Developments, Rentals, Starchitecture

VIA West 57, 625 West 57th Street, Bjarke Ingels, Durst Organization, the pyramid building, NYC starchitecture

Bjarke Ingels’ ever-captivating tetrahedron, officially known as Via 57 West and located at 625 West 57th Street, is set to hit the rental market on March 1st, and ahead of the launch, the Durst Organization has released pricing information, reports Curbed. In total, the flashy building will have 709 apartments, 142 of which are affordable and start at just $565/month. The market-rate units, however, will be considerably pricier, with an average asking price of $2,770/month for studios, $3,880 for one-bedrooms, $6,500 for two-bedrooms, $11,000 for three-bedrooms, and a whopping $16,500 for four-bedrooms. Eight listings have already gone live, and they’re offering two months free on a 14-month lease or three months free on a 27-month lease.

More details ahead

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